The Modern Period: 1900-1950
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The Modern Period: 1900-1950

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The American Dream. Three basic principles:America is a new Eden, a promised land\" of beauty, unlimited resources, and endless opportunities.The American birthright is one of ever-expanding opportunity. Progress is a good thing, and we can optimistically expect life to keep getting better and be
The Modern Period: 1900-1950

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1. The Modern Period: 1900-1950 ?Make it new!? - Ezra Pound 1860: 1 in 6 people lived in a city; 1890: 1 in 3.1860: 1 in 6 people lived in a city; 1890: 1 in 3.

2. The American Dream Three basic principles: America is a new Eden, a ?promised land? of beauty, unlimited resources, and endless opportunities. The American birthright is one of ever-expanding opportunity. Progress is a good thing, and we can optimistically expect life to keep getting better and better. The independent, self-reliant individual will triumph. Everything is possible for the person who places trust in his or her own powers and potential. What do I mean by a ?new Eden?? Where do I get that reference from? (Answer: the Purtains, ?We will be as a city on a hill??) What do I mean by a ?new Eden?? Where do I get that reference from? (Answer: the Purtains, ?We will be as a city on a hill??)

4. Characteristics of Modernism Sense of disappointment and loss of faith in the American dream Rejection of traditional themes and subjects Rejection of the idea of a hero as perfect in favor of a hero who is flawed and disillusioned but shows ?grace under pressure? What do you think brings about these changes? Think to your history classes about what is going on during this period.What do you think brings about these changes? Think to your history classes about what is going on during this period.

5. Characteristics of Modernism, cont. Interest in the inner workings of the human mind. Sometimes expressed through new narrative techniques such as stream of consciousness Emphasis on bold experimentation in style and form Examples:

7. Rejection of Traditional Forms: What is art? In 1917, Marcel Duchamp submitted the piece to the left (under the name ?R. Mutt?) to an exhibition of art which proclaimed it would exhibit all artwork submitted. However, after a lengthy debate among the board members about whether or not the piece was ?art,? they decided not to show the piece.

8. Rejection of Traditional Forms: What is art? Controversy arose from this decision. One publication wrote, ?Whether Mr Mutt made the fountain with his own hands or not has no importance. He CHOSE it. He took an article of life, placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title and point of view ? created a new thought for that object? (The Blind Man). How is the definition of what is ?art? changing?How is the definition of what is ?art? changing?

9. Part One: World War I & The Jazz Age ?I had a world, and it slipped away from me. The War blew up more than the bodies of men?It blew ideas away?? - Sherwood Anderson

10. Part One: World War I (1914-1918) Video: Write five USEFUL facts about WWI in your notes.Video: Write five USEFUL facts about WWI in your notes.

11. Part One: World War I (1914-1918)

12. Part One: World War I (1914-1918) America emerges as a world power. However, there was an increasing sense of disillusionment creeping into American fiction. This generation is called ?The Lost Generation? Power shift away from the European countries as they recover from the effects of the war. Power shift away from the European countries as they recover from the effects of the war.

13. Part One: The Lost Generation ?You are all a lost generation.? ? Gertrude Stein?You are all a lost generation.? ? Gertrude Stein

14. Part One: The Jazz Age (The High Points) It had? Jazz! Prohibition! Women?s suffrage! Short dresses! Short hair (on women!) Drinking! (So much for Prohibition!) Organized crime! In short, people just trying to have a good time. ?The Flapper awoke from her lethargy of sub-deb-ism, bobbed her hair, put on her choicest pair of earrings and a great deal of audacity and rouge and went into the battle. She flirted because it was fun to flirt and wore a one-piece bathing suit because she had a good figure?... she was conscious that the things she did were the things she had always wanted to do. Mothers disapproved of their sons taking the Flapper to dances, to teas, to swim and most of all to heart.? ? Milford 1970, p. 91.?The Flapper awoke from her lethargy of sub-deb-ism, bobbed her hair, put on her choicest pair of earrings and a great deal of audacity and rouge and went into the battle. She flirted because it was fun to flirt and wore a one-piece bathing suit because she had a good figure?... she was conscious that the things she did were the things she had always wanted to do. Mothers disapproved of their sons taking the Flapper to dances, to teas, to swim and most of all to heart.? ? Milford 1970, p. 91.

15. Wait a minute, Mr. Lowman. Some of you may be asking, ?Didn?t you tell us the Modern Period is depressing?? It is, although you may be fooled by the veneer of happy prosperity during the 1920s. People were engaging in this frivolity in order to ignore the problems in society. Now, on with the PowerPoint.

16. The Flapper Flappers were quite scandalous. They: smoked cigarettes; went to Jazz clubs (at night!); bobbed their hair; rode bicycles; drove cars; drank. In other words, they didn?t know their place as women. (according to society) ?The Flapper awoke from her lethargy of sub-deb-ism, bobbed her hair, put on her choicest pair of earrings and a great deal of audacity and rouge and went into the battle. She flirted because it was fun to flirt and wore a one-piece bathing suit because she had a good figure?... she was conscious that the things she did were the things she had always wanted to do. Mothers disapproved of their sons taking the Flapper to dances, to teas, to swim and most of all to heart.? ? Milford 1970, p. 91. ?The Flapper awoke from her lethargy of sub-deb-ism, bobbed her hair, put on her choicest pair of earrings and a great deal of audacity and rouge and went into the battle. She flirted because it was fun to flirt and wore a one-piece bathing suit because she had a good figure?... she was conscious that the things she did were the things she had always wanted to do. Mothers disapproved of their sons taking the Flapper to dances, to teas, to swim and most of all to heart.? ? Milford 1970, p. 91.

17. The Flapper, cont.

18. F. Scott Fitzgerald B. 1896 Full name: Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald Left Princeton to enlist in the US Army during World War I; however, the war ended shortly after his enlistment. Married Zelda Sayre in 1920. Fitzgerald was named after his famous relative Francis Scott Key, but was referred to as "Scott." His first literary effort, a detective story, was published in a school newspaper when he was 13 A poor student, Fitzgerald left Princeton to enlist in the US Army during World War I; however, the war ended shortly after Fitzgerald's enlistment. While at Camp Sheridan, Fitzgerald met Zelda Sayre (1900?1948), the "golden girl", in Fitzgerald's words, of Montgomery, Alabama youth society. She was the daughter of an Alabama Supreme Court Judge. The two were engaged in 1919, and Fitzgerald moved into an apartment at 1395 Lexington Avenue in New York City to try to lay a foundation for his life with Zelda. Working at an advertising firm and writing short stories, he was unable to convince Zelda that he would be able to support her, leading her to break off the engagement.Fitzgerald was named after his famous relative Francis Scott Key, but was referred to as "Scott." His first literary effort, a detective story, was published in a school newspaper when he was 13 A poor student, Fitzgerald left Princeton to enlist in the US Army during World War I; however, the war ended shortly after Fitzgerald's enlistment. While at Camp Sheridan, Fitzgerald met Zelda Sayre (1900?1948), the "golden girl", in Fitzgerald's words, of Montgomery, Alabama youth society. She was the daughter of an Alabama Supreme Court Judge. The two were engaged in 1919, and Fitzgerald moved into an apartment at 1395 Lexington Avenue in New York City to try to lay a foundation for his life with Zelda. Working at an advertising firm and writing short stories, he was unable to convince Zelda that he would be able to support her, leading her to break off the engagement.

19. F. Scott Fitzgerald, cont. Published four novels in his lifetime: This Side of Paradise (1920) The Beautiful and Damned (1922) The Great Gatsby (1925) Tender Is the Night (1934) The Last Tycoon (published posthumously, 1942)

20. F. Scott Fitzgerald, cont. Fitzgerald is viewed as being the voice of his age. His works are evocative of the emotional turmoil and struggle of the post-WWI period. D. 1940

21. Part Two: The Great Depression & World War II

22. The Great Depression

23. World War II

24. Works Consulted http://www.firstworldwar.com/features/casualties.htm


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