The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy
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The Development of High-Resolution Imaging in Radio Astronomy. Jim Moran Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. 7th IRAM Interferometry School, Grenoble, October 4 – 7, 2010.

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The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

The Development of High-Resolution Imaging in Radio Astronomy

Jim Moran

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

7th IRAM Interferometry School, Grenoble, October 4–7, 2010

It is an honor to give this lecture in the city where Joseph Fourier did the work that is so fundamental to our craft.


Outline of talk

Outline of Talk

I. Origins of Interferometry

II. Fundamental Theorem of Interferometry

(Van Cittert-Zernike Theorem)

III. Limits to Resolution (uv plane coverage)

IV. Quest for High Resolution in the 1950s

V. Key Ideas in Image Calibration and Restoration

VI. Back to Basics – Imaging Sgr A* in 2010 and beyond


I origins of interferometry

Thomas Young (1773–1829)

Albert Michelson (1852–1931)

Martin Ryle (1918–1984)

John Bolton (1922–1993)

Martin Ryle (1918–1984)

I. Origins of Interferometry

A. Young’s Two-Slit Experiment

B. Michelson’s Stellar Interferometer

C. Basic Radio Implementation

D. Ryle’s Correlator

E. Sea Cliff Interferometer

F. Earth Rotation Synthesis


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

quasi-monochromatic

light source

Source plane

Aperture plane

(screen with 2 small holes)

Pupil or Image plane

X

I = (E1 + E2)2

= E12 + E22 + 2(E1E2)

I

Bright

Fringes

Dark

X

interference term

bandwidth effect

t  1

Imax– Imin

Imax+ Imin

V =

Imax

Imin

Young’s Two-Slit Experiment (1805)

1. Move source  shift pattern (phase)

2. Change aperture hole spacing  change period of fringes

3. Enlarge source plane hole  reduce visibility


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Michelson-Pease Stellar Interferometer (1890-1920)

Two outrigger mirrors on the Mount Wilson 100 inch telescope

Paths for on axis ray and slightly offset ray

Image plane fringe pattern.

Solid line: unresolved star

Dotted line: resolved star


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

s

d

R = I cos

 = d s = cos

2

2d

2d

2d

dsin

d

dt

2d sin

“fringes”

 = 2 = 

= e sin

R

d

d

= sin

projected baseline

d sin

 =

Simple Radio Interferometer


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Simple Adding Interferometer (Ryle, 1952)

R = (a + b)2 = a2 +b2 +2ab

Cassiopeia A

Cygnus A


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Phase Switching Interferometer (Ryle, 1952)

R = (a + b)2 – (a–b)2 = 4ab


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Sea Cliff Interferometer (Bolton and Stanley, 1948)

Time in hours

Response to Cygnus A at 100 MHz (Nature, 161, 313, 1948)


Ii fundamental theorem

II. Fundamental Theorem

A. Van Cittert-Zernike Theorem

B. Projection Slice Theorem

C. Some Fourier Transforms


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

2

2

2

E1= ei r

source distribution I(,)

y′

1

( = y′/z)

r1

E2= ei r

Huygen’s principle

Sky Plane

2

z

r2

x′

2

r1 r2

r2

r1

( = x′/z)

E1E2 = ei (r – r )

*

1

2

E1

E2

 2 = I(,) r1r2  z2

Ground Plane

Integrate over source

y

=v

x

V(u,v) = I(,) ei2(u +v) d d

=u

  • Assumptions

  • Incoherent source

  • Far field z>d2/ ; d =104 km,  =1 mm, z>3 pc !

  • Small field of view

  • Narrow bandwidth  field =

( )

dmax



max

Van Cittert–Zernike Theorem (1934)


F u v f x y e i 2 ux vy dx dy f u 0 f x y dy e i 2 ux dx f u 0 f s x

“strip” integral

F (u,v) = f(x,y) e–i2(ux + vy) dx dyF(u,0) = [f(x,y)dy ] e–i2ux dxF(u,0)  fs(x)

Projection-Slice Theorem (Bracewell, 1956)

Works for any arbitrary angle

Strip integrals, also called back projections,

are the common link between radio interferometry

and medical tomography.


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Visibility (Fringe) Amplitude Functions for Various Source Models

Moran, PhD thesis, 1968


Iii limits to resolution uv plane coverage

III. Limits to Resolution (uv plane coverage)

A. Lunar Occultation

B. uv Plane Coverage of a Single Aperture


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Moon as a

knife edge

Im() = I()  H()

Im(u) = I(u) H(u) where H(u) = 1/u

H

u



F.T.

H

Lunar Occultation

Geometric optics  one-dimension integration

of source intensity

MacMahon (1909)


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

H

H

u

2R

F =

  (wiggles) (R = earth-moon distance)

1

F = 5 mas @ 0.5 wavelength

F = 2´ @ 10 m wavelength

´

Criticized by Eddington (1909)

Same amplitude as response in geometric optics,

but scrambled phase

2

H = e –iF usign(u)


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Occultation of Beta Capricorni with

Mt. Wilson 100 Inch Telescope and

Fast Photoelectric Detector

Whitford, Ap.J., 89, 472, 1939


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Radio Occultation Curves (Hazard et al., 1963)

3C273


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

D

F.T.

D

D

v

u

Single Aperture

Single Pixel

Airy Pattern

Restore high

spatial frequencies

up to u = D/

 no super resolution

= 1.2 /D

Chinese Hat Function


Iv quest for high resolution in the 1950s

IV. Quest for High Resolution in the 1950s

A. Hanbury Brown’s Three Ideas

B. The Cygnus A Story


Hanbury brown s three ideas for high angular resolution

Hanbury Brown’s Three Ideasfor High Angular Resolution

1. Let the Earth Move (250 km/s, but beware the radiometer formula!)

2. Reflection off Moon (resolution too high)

3. Intensity Interferometer (inspired the field of quantum optics)

In about 1950, when sources were called “radio stars,” Hanbury Brown had several ideas of how to dramatically increase angular resolution to resolve them.


Intensity interferometry

v1

v2

Normal Interferometer

 = v1v2  V

Intensity Interferometer

 = v12v22

Intensity Interferometry

Fourth-order moment theorem for Gaussian processes

v1v2v3v4 = v1v2 v3v4 + v1v3 v2v4 + v1v4 v2v3

 = v12v22 = v12v22 + v1v2 2

 = P1P2 + V2

constant

square of visibility


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Observations of Cygnus A with Jodrell Bank Intensity Interferometer

Square of Visibility

at 125 MHz

Jennison and Das Gupta, 1952, see Sullivan 2010


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Cygnus A with Cambridge 1-mile Telescope at 1.4 GHz

3 telescopes

20 arcsec resolution

Ryle, Elsmore, and Neville, Nature, 205, 1259, 1965


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Cygnus A with Cambridge 5 km Interferometer at 5 GHz

16 element E-W Array, 3 arcsec resolution

Hargrave and Ryle, MNRAS, 166, 305, 1974


V key ideas in image calibration and restoration

V. Key Ideas in Image Calibration and Restoration

A. CLEAN

B. Phase and Amplitude Closure

C. Self Calibration

D. Mosaicking

E. The Cygnus A Story Continued

Jan Högbom (1930–)

Roger Jennison (1922–2006)

Alan Rogers (1942–)

several

Ron Eker (~1944–)

Arnold Rots (1946–)


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

First Illustration of Clean Algorithm on 3C224.1

at 2.7 GHz with Green Bank Interferometer

Zero, 1, 2 and 6

iterations

J. Högbom, Astron. Astrophys. Suppl., 15, 417, 1974


Closure phase necessity is the mother of invention

to source

3

2

3

1

2

d12

0

d12 + d23 + d31 = 0

2



12 = d12 s + 1– 2

2



C = 12 + 23 + 31 = [d12 + d23 + d31] s

noise

1

2

m= v+ (i – j) + ij

N(N– 1)

2

ij

ij

C = m + m + m = v + v + v + noise

12

23

31

12

23

31

2

N

N stations  baselines, (N – 1)(N – 2) closure conditions

fraction of phases

N = 27, f 0.9

f = 1 –

“cloud” with phase shift 1 = 2 t

Observe a Point Source

Closure Phase

“Necessity is the Mother of Invention”

Arbitrary Source Distribution

R. Jennison, 1952 (thesis): MNRAS, 118, 276, 1956; A. Rogers et al., Ap.J., 193, 293, 1974


Closure amplitude n 4

Unknown voltage gain factors for each antenna gi (i = 1–4)

Closure Amplitude

N ≥ 4


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

A Half Century of Improvements

in Imaging of Cygnus A

Kellermann and Moran, Ann. Rev. Astron., 39, 457, 2001


Vi back to basics

VI. Back to Basics

Imaging Sgr A* in 2010 and beyond


230 ghz observations of sgra

908 km

4030 km

4630 km

230 GHz Observations of SgrA*

VLBI program led by large consortium led by Shep Doeleman, MIT/Haystack


The development of high resolution imaging in radio astronomy

Visibility Amplitude on SgrA* at 230 GHz, March 2010

Days 96 and 97 (2010)

Model fits: (solid) Gaussian, 37 uas FWHM; (dotted) Annular ring, 105/48 as diameter – both with 25 as of interstellar scattering

Doeleman et al., private communication


New sub mm vlbi sites

New (sub)mm VLBI Sites

Phase 1: 7 Telescopes (+ IRAM, PdB, LMT, Chile)

Phase 2: 10 Telescopes (+ Spole, SEST, Haystack)

Phase 3: 13 Telescopes (+ NZ, Africa)


Progression to an image

GR Model

7 Stations

13 Stations

Progression to an Image

Doeleman et al., “The Event Horizon Telescope,” Astro2010: The Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey, Science White Papers, no. 68


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