Story elements
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Story Elements. Characters. A dynamic character is one who goes through a personality change due to the events in the story. A static character is one whose personality does not change throughout the story. Round Characters.

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Story Elements

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Story elements

Story Elements


Characters

Characters

A dynamic character is one who goes through a personality change due to the events in the story.

A static character is one whose personality does not change throughout the story.


Round characters

Round Characters

A round character is one whose personality, background, motives, and other features are fully described or explained by the author. In general, main characters are round because many insights are given.


Flat characters

Flat Characters

A flat character is one who is not fully described but is useful in carrying out some narrative purpose of the author. They tend to be minor characters.


Dynamic and round

Dynamic and Round

In most books the main character is both dynamic and round.


Round and static

Round and Static

Characters can be round and static. For example, think about the character James Bond. We know a great deal about this character’s personality (round), yet he does not go through an inner personality change from the beginning to the end of the story (static). Often the side-kick in a story is round and static.


Dynamic and flat

Dynamic and Flat

Characters cannot be dynamic and flat, because in a flat character we do not know enough about them to recognize a change.


Dynamic or static round or flat

Dynamic or StaticRound or Flat

Ebenezer Scrooge

from Charles Dickens's

A Christmas Carol


Story elements

Dynamic and Round


Dynamic or static round or flat1

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat

Billy Coleman

from Wilson RawlsWhere the Red Fern Grows


Story elements

Dynamic and Round


Dynamic or static round or flat2

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat

Will Coleman (Billy’s dad)

from Wilson Rawls’Where the Red Fern Grows


Story elements

Static and Flat  


Dynamic or static round or flat3

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat

Mayor Cole

from Jeanne DuPrau’s  The City of Ember


Story elements

Static and Flat


Dynamic or static round or flat4

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat

Lina Mayfleet

from Jeanne DuPrau’s  The City of Ember


Story elements

Dynamic and Round


Dynamic or static round or flat5

Dynamic or Static Round or Flat

Robin from Batman


Story elements

Static and Round


Assignment

Assignment

Think about thesecharacters in The Cay.

  • Phillip Enright

  • Timothy

  • Mrs. Enright (Grace)

  • Mr. Enright (Phillip)

  • Henrik van Boven

    Are they dynamic or static & round or flat.


Assignment answer key

Assignment - Answer Key

Phillip Enrightdynamic round

Timothystatic round

Mrs. Enright (Grace) static flat

Mr. Enright (Phillip) static flat

Henrik van Bovenstatic flat


First person point of view

First-Person Point of View

In the first-person point of view one character tells the story. This character reveals only personal thoughts and feelings of what s/he sees. The writer uses pronouns such as "I“, "me“, “mine”, or "my".

Example:I woke up this morning feeling terrific. I hopped out of bed excited to start the new day. Iknew that today was the day my big surprise would come.


Second person point of view

Second-Person Point of View

With the second-person point of view the narrator tells the story using the pronoun "you".  The character is someone similar to you.

Example:You wake up feeling really terrific. Then you hop out of bed excited to start the new day. You know that today is the day that your big surprise will come.

This is rarely used in literature. It can be seen in Choose Your Own Adventure books.


Third person point of view

Third-Person Point of View

The third-person point of view is the most commonly used in fiction. When writing in the third-person you will use pronouns such as "he", "she", or "it".

Example:Brian woke up feeling terrific. He hopped out of bed excited to start the new day. He knew that today was the day that his big surprise would come.


Group practice

Group Practice

Using your index cards, determine if each of the following excerpts are written in first, second, or third-point of view.


1 st 2 nd or 3 rd point of view

1st, 2nd, or 3rd Point of View

Excerpt from Woodsong by Gary PaulsenI go up to the front of the team in the darkness and drag them around, realizing we are lost. My clothes have been ripped on tree limbs and my face is bleeding from cuts, and when I look back down the side of the mountain we have just climbed I see twenty-seven head lamps bobbing up the trail. Twenty-seven teams have taken our smell as the valid trail and are following us. Twenty-seven teams must be met head on in the narrow brush and passed and told to turn around.


Story elements

Excerpt from Woodsong

by Gary Paulsen

First-Person Point of View


1 st 2 nd or 3 rd point of view1

1st, 2nd, or 3rd Point of View

Excerpted from Soldier's Heart by Gary PaulsenThere would be a shooting war. There were rebels who had violated the law and fired on Fort Sumter and the only thing they'd respect was steel, it was said, and he knew they were right, and the Union was right, and one other thing they said as well--if a man didn't hurry he'd miss it. The only shooting war to come in a man's life and if a man didn't step right along he'd miss the whole thing.Charley didn't figure to miss it. The only problem was that Charley wasn't rightly a man yet, at least not to the army. He was fifteen and while he worked as a man worked, in the fields all of a day and into night, and looked like a man standing tall and just a bit thin with hands so big they covered a stove lid, he didn't make a beard yet and his voice had only just dropped enough so he could talk with men.


Story elements

Excerpted from Soldier's Heart

by Gary Paulsen

Third-Person Point of View


1 st 2 nd or 3 rd point of view2

1st, 2nd, or 3rd Point of View

"You saw", "You think". to understand the second person perspective, imagine you are giving a speech to your classmates about how to bake a cake, instructions are usually given in the second person point of view because it tells the reader what to think, feel, or do. The second person can also be used when a writer is addressing a familiar audience.


1 st 2 nd or 3 rd point of view3

1st, 2nd, or 3rd Point of View

Excerpted from Nightjohn by Gary Paulsen        

A        "Tonight we just do A." He sat back on his heels and pointed. "There it be."        I looked at it, wondered how it stood. "Where's the bottom to it?"        "There it stands on two feet, just like you."        "What does it mean?"        "It means A--just like I said. It's the first letter in the alphabet. And when you see it you make a sound like this: ayyy, or ahhhh."        "That's reading? To make that sound?"        He nodded. "When you see that letter on paper or a sack or in the dirt you make one of those sounds. That's reading."


Story elements

Excerpted from Nightjohnby Gary Paulsen

Third-Person Point of View


1 st 2 nd or 3 rd point of view4

1st, 2nd, or 3rd Point of View

Excerpted from Caught by the Sea by Gary Paulsen I drove to California that very day, straight to the coast, then north, away from people, to a small town named Guadalupe, near Santa Maria. There I bought some cans of beans and bread and Spam and fruit cocktail and a cheap sleeping bag and then walked out through the sand dunes, where I could hear the surf crashing. I walked until I could see the water coming in, rolling in from the vastness, and I sat down and let the sea heal me.


Story elements

Excerpted from Caught by the Seaby Gary Paulsen

First-Person Point of View


1 st 2 nd or 3 rd point of view5

1st, 2nd, or 3rd Point of View

Excerpted from Guts by Gary Paulsen I have spent an inordinate amount of time in wilderness woods, much of it in northern Minnesota, some in Canada and some in the Alaskan wilds. I have hunted and trapped and fished and have been exposed to almost all kinds of wilderness animals; I’ve had bear come at me, been stalked by a mountain lion, been bitten by snakes and punctured by porcupines and torn by foxes and once pecked by an attacking raven, but I have never seen anything rivaling the madness that seems to infect a large portion of the moose family.


Story elements

Excerpted from Guts

by Gary Paulsen

First-Person Point of View


1 st 2 nd or 3 rd point of view6

1st, 2nd, or 3rd Point of View

Excerpted from Winterkill by Gary Paulsen

And I would like to stop the story of Duda here and tell how he got his divorce and married Bonnie and they adopted me and we bought a farm . . . . That's how it would end in a movie, with Rock Hudson playing Duda and Doris Day playing Bonnie, and that's how it should end, and that's how I dream of it ending almost every night, until I wake up sweating and remember that it isn't a movie and it doesn't end that way.


Story elements

Excerpted from Winterkill

by Gary Paulsen

First-Person Point of View


Third person point of view1

Third-Person Point of View

Third-person point of view may be written using several variations.

In the third-person objective the story is told without describing any character's thoughts, opinions, or feelings. Think of this as seeing what a camera can see. A camera can not see what is going on inside someone’s mind.


Third person objective

Third-Person Objective

Third-person objective is rarely used except in easy picture books.

Example

The alarm clock sounded. Brian cut off the clock and jumped out of bed. He had a smile on his face.


Third person point of view2

Third-Person Point of View

In the third-person omniscient, the reader knows exactly what is going on inside various characters’ heads in regards to their thoughts and feelings.

Rob is surprised.

Tim is sneaky.

Joe is sad.

Pete is in love.


Third person omniscient

Third-Person Omniscient

Example from Woods Runner by Gary Paulsen

Although Samuel's parents lived in the wilderness, they were not a part of it. They had been raised in towns and had been educated in schools where they'd been taught to read and write and play musical instruments. They moved west when Samuel was a baby, so that they could devote themselves to a quiet life of hard physical work and contemplation. They loved the woods, but they did not understand them. Not like Samuel.  

(Here the reader knows both the parents’ and Samuel’s feelings.)


Third person point of view3

Third-Person Point of View

In third-person limited, the reader knows only one character's mind, either throughout the entire work or in a specific section. The narration is limited to what can be known, seen, thought, or judged from a single character's perspective.

Sally wondered what the boys were thinking.


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