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K w a n z a a. K w a n z a a. Today you are going to learn: The purpose of Kwanzaa The colors of Kwanzaa What “Kwanzaa” means in Swahili At least 5 countries of Africa The 7 basic symbols of Kwanzaa The 7 principles of Kwanzaa. K w a n z a a. Kwanzaa means “the first fruit” in Swahili.

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K w a n z a a

Kwanzaa


K w a n z a a1
Kwanzaa

Today you are going to learn:

  • The purpose of Kwanzaa

  • The colors of Kwanzaa

  • What “Kwanzaa” means in Swahili

  • At least 5 countries of Africa

  • The 7 basic symbols of Kwanzaa

  • The 7 principles of Kwanzaa


K w a n z a a2
Kwanzaa

  • Kwanzaa means “the first fruit” in Swahili.

  • Swahili is a language spoken in Africa.

  • Remember, Africa is a continent.

    • Can you name the countries of Africa?




Countries of Africa


K w a n z a a3
Kwanzaa

  • Unlike many other cultural celebrations around the world in the month of December, Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday.


Symbols of k w a n z a a
Symbols ofKwanzaa

Mkeka

A traditional straw or woven textile mat, called a mkeka, is one of the seven symbols of Kwanzaa. Those who celebrate Kwanzaa view the mkeka as the base for the other six symbols of Kwanzaa, representing the idea that nothing can be built without having a foundation upon which to rest.

From: http://www.education.com/activity/article/weave-kwanzaa-mat/

Mkeka - the mat

Kinara - the candleholder

Mishumaa Saba - the seven candles

Kikombe cha Umoja - the unity cup

Mazao - the crops

Muhindi - corn

Zawadi - gifts


K w a n z a a4
Kwanzaa

Mishumaa Saba

(seven candles)

During Kwanzaa, families light candles in a candleholder called a kinara. Each day of Kwanzaa has a special meaning or principle. At the end of the seven days, children receive African or handmade gifts. Families and friends enjoy a feast, sing songs, play music and share stories of their family history.


K w a n z a a5
Kwanzaa

7 principles of Kwanzaa

1. Umoja (Oo-moe-jah) – unity

Success starts with Unity. Unity of family, community, nation and race.


K w a n z a a6
Kwanzaa

7 principles of Kwanzaa

1. Umoja (Oo-moe-jah) – unity

Success starts with Unity. Unity of family, community, nation and race.

2. Kujich agulia (Koo-gee-cha-goo-lee-ah) – self determination

To be responsible for ourselves. To create your own destiny.


K w a n z a a7
Kwanzaa

7 principles of Kwanzaa

1. Umoja (Oo-moe-jah) – unity

Success starts with Unity. Unity of family, community, nation and race.

2. Kujich agulia (Koo-gee-cha-goo-lee-ah) – self determination

To be responsible for ourselves. To create your own destiny.

3. Ujima (Oo-gee-mah) – collective work and responsibility

To build and maintain your community together. To work together to help one another within your community.


K w a n z a a8
Kwanzaa

7 principles of Kwanzaa

1. Umoja (Oo-moe-jah) – unity

Success starts with Unity. Unity of family, community, nation and race.

2. Kujich agulia (Koo-gee-cha-goo-lee-ah) – self determination

To be responsible for ourselves. To create your own destiny.

3. Ujima (Oo-gee-mah) – collective work and responsibility

To build and maintain your community together. To work together to help one another within your community.

4. Ujamaa (Oo-jah-mah) – cooperative economics

To build, maintain, and support our own stores, establishments, and businesses.


K w a n z a a9
Kwanzaa

7 principles of Kwanzaa

1. Umoja (Oo-moe-jah) – unity

Success starts with Unity. Unity of family, community, nation and race.

2. Kujich agulia (Koo-gee-cha-goo-lee-ah) – self determination

To be responsible for ourselves. To create your own destiny.

3. Ujima (Oo-gee-mah) – collective work and responsibility

To build and maintain your community together. To work together to help one another within your community.

4. Ujamaa (Oo-jah-mah) – cooperative economics

To build, maintain, and support our own stores, establishments, and businesses.

5. Nia (Nee-ah) – purpose

To restore African American people to their traditional

greatness. To be responsible to Those Who Came

Before (our ancestors) and to Those Who Will Follow

(our descendants).


K w a n z a a10
Kwanzaa

7 principles of Kwanzaa

1. Umoja (Oo-moe-jah) – unity

Success starts with Unity. Unity of family, community, nation and race.

2. Kujich agulia (Koo-gee-cha-goo-lee-ah) – self determination

To be responsible for ourselves. To create your own destiny.

3. Ujima (Oo-gee-mah) – collective work and responsibility

To build and maintain your community together. To work together to help one another within your community.

4. Ujamaa (Oo-jah-mah) – cooperative economics

To build, maintain, and support our own stores, establishments, and businesses.

5. Nia (Nee-ah) – purpose

To restore African American people to their traditional

greatness. To be responsible to Those Who Came

Before (our ancestors) and to Those Who Will Follow

(our descendants).

6. Kuumba (Koom-bah) – creativity

Using creativity and imagination to make your

communities better than what you inherited.


K w a n z a a11
Kwanzaa

7 principles of Kwanzaa

1. Umoja (Oo-moe-jah) – unity

Success starts with Unity. Unity of family, community, nation and race.

2. Kujich agulia (Koo-gee-cha-goo-lee-ah) – self determination

To be responsible for ourselves. To create your own destiny.

3. Ujima (Oo-gee-mah) – collective work and responsibility

To build and maintain your community together. To work together to help one another within your community.

4. Ujamaa (Oo-jah-mah) – cooperative economics

To build, maintain, and support our own stores, establishments, and businesses.

5. Nia (Nee-ah) – purpose

To restore African American people to their traditional

greatness. To be responsible to Those Who Came

Before (our ancestors) and to Those Who Will Follow

(our descendants).

6. Kuumba (Koom-bah) – creativity

Using creativity and imagination to make your

communities better than what you inherited.

7. Imani (Ee-mahn-e) – faith

Believing in our people, our families, our educators, our leaders

and the righteousness of the African American struggle.


And now…let’s learn a little more about Kwanzaa from the History Channel.

Click here:

http://www.history.com/topics/kwanzaa-history/videos#history-of-kwanzaa



Your k w a n z a a mission
Your Kwanzaa Mission:

  • Now it’s time for you to work independently and take charge of your learning about Kwanzaa.

  • You will receive an activity packet to accompany your worksheet.

  • First: Read through your packet.

  • Second: Finish your worksheet.

  • Third: Have fun working on the puzzles and map in your packet.



Our k w a n z a a karamu
Our Kwanzaa Karamu

This afternoon we are going to honor the sixth day of Kwanzaa –

Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah): creativity

We are going to create our own Mkeka!

(Wait, what’s that again?)


Mkeka

A traditional straw or woven textile mat, called a mkeka, is one of the seven symbols of Kwanzaa. Those who celebrate Kwanzaa view the mkeka as the base for the other six symbols of Kwanzaa, representing the idea that nothing can be built without having a foundation upon which to rest.

From: http://www.education.com/activity/article/weave-kwanzaa-mat/


Traditionally, at the end of the Kwanzaa Karamu celebration (on December 31st), everyone stands as the elder reads (EVERYBODY STAND!)

Strive for discipline, dedication, and achievement in all you do. Dare struggle and sacrifice and gain the strength that comes from this. Build where you are and dare leave a legacy that will last as long as the sun shines and the water flows. Practice daily Umoja, Kujichagulia, Ujima, Ujamaa, Nia, Kuumba, and Imani. And may the wisdom of the ancestors always walk with us. May the year's end meet us laughing, and stronger. May our children honor us by following our example in love and struggle. And at the end of next year, may we sit together again, in larger numbers, with greater achievement and closer to liberation and a higher level of life.

  • Then the elder leads the guests in the Harambee (ha-RAM-bee) salute. Each person raises their right fist about as high as their shoulder, then pulls down forcefully until the elbow is next to next to their torso, saying "Harambee!" This is done seven times in unison.

  • This concludes the Karamu celebration.

    NICE JOB!


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