Building administrator support across implementation stages
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Building Administrator Support across Implementation Stages. Using Implementation Science to Support Administrators at PBIS Schools. Exceptional Children Division Behavior Support and Special Programs Positive Behavior Intervention and Support Initiative. Presenters. Marcie Beard

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Building Administrator Support across Implementation Stages

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Building Administrator Support across Implementation Stages

Using Implementation Science to Support Administrators at PBIS Schools.


Exceptional Children Division

Behavior Support and Special Programs

Positive Behavior Intervention and Support Initiative


Presenters

  • Marcie Beard

    • Principal, Pitts Road Elementary School, Concord, NC

    • [email protected]

  • Trisha Scardina

    • Assistant Principal, Beverly Hills Elementary School, Concord, NC

    • [email protected]

  • Beth Kolb

    • PBIS/RtICoordinator, Cabarrus County Schools, NC

    • [email protected]

  • Laura Winter

    • Region 6 PBIS Coordinator, NC DPI

    • [email protected]


Introduction

Implementation Science and PBIS in North Carolina


Introduction

Survey of NC School Administrators

  • Administrator strategies for actively supporting PBIS (65%)

  • Intensive supports (53%)

  • Problem solving with discipline data (44%)

  • Supplemental supports (40%)

  • Integrating PBIS and other initiatives (38%)

  • Supporting a transition away from punitive approaches to discipline (33%)

  • Effective integration of PBIS into the school improvement plan (28%)

  • Disciplinary referral practices and procedures (27%)


Introduction

Key Roles/Factors for Administrator Involvement

  • Participation

  • Supporting Team Implementation

  • Fostering Communication

  • Creating a Climate

  • Facilitating Leadership

  • Establishing a Vision

  • Considering Policies and Procedures

(Kincaid, Childs, Wallace & Blasé, 2007)


Implementation Science

What is Implementation Science?

  • Interventions

  • Stages

  • Drivers

  • Teams

  • Cycles

    http://sisep.fpg.unc.edu/learning-zone/who


Implementation Science

Stages

  • Exploration

  • Installation

  • Initial Implementation

  • Full Implementation


Implementation Science

Drivers

  • Competency

    • Staff selection

    • Training

    • Coaching

    • Performance assessments

  • Organization

    • Decision support data system

    • Facilitative administration

    • Systems interventions

  • Leadership

    • Adaptive leadership

    • Technical leadership


Implementation Science

Cycles

  • Ongoing Problem-Solving =TIPS

  • Policy-Practice-Feedback Loop

    http://sisep.fpg.unc.edu/learning-zone/science-of-implementation/implementation-frameworks/cycles


Implementation Science

PBIS

  • Administrator focus is impacted by the phase of implementation.

  • The effectiveness of efforts is increased.

  • Stages are cyclical, not necessarily linear. Activities during each stage should facilitate progress with the focus of implementation at that time.


Implementation Science


Exploration

Administrator Focus: Exploration Stage


Exploration

Participation

  • Public Support (Colvin & Sprick, 99)

  • Enthusiasm about implementation (Bohannon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)


Exploration

Supporting Team Implementation

  • Select effective team members. (Kaster, 2005)

  • Ensure team is representative of the staff. (Bohannon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)

  • Know who would be capable team members. (Bohanon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)


Exploration

Fostering Communication

  • Communicate the importance of implementation with all stakeholders. (Colvin & Sprick, 1999)

  • Regularly communicate implementation actions with staff members. (Colvin & Sprick, 1999)


Exploration

Creating the Climate

Use surveys to establish buy-in. (Kaster, 2005; George & Martinez, 2007)

  • Ask for perceptions from staff, students and families.

  • Share discipline/behavior data through gallery walks or PLCs to gather feedback.

  • Use walk-through tools to capture current practices.


Installation

Administrator Focus: Installation Stage


Installation

Participation

  • Attend training with school team. (Bohanon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)

  • Regularly attend meetings. (Colvin & Sprick, 1999)

  • Model behavior expected of staff and students.

  • Reinforce staff efforts to meet expectations.


Installation

Supporting Team Implementation

  • Support team members with time and resources. (Colvin & Sprick, 1999)

  • Regularly attend team meetings. (Kaster, 2005; Bohannon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)


Installation

Facilitating Leadership

  • Support teacher leaders on the PBIS team.

  • Provide PBIS team with tools.


Installation

Establishing the Vision

Determine how PBIS implementation will address:

  • Needs identified through data analysis and problem-solving process

  • Goals outlined in the School Improvement Plan

  • Academic performance


The School Improvement Plan is written every summer using Baldridge School Improvement Model. Training is facilitated through the district’s Accountability department, with coaching from Curriculum and Instruction personnel. PBIS Schools use data from the Accountability department and the SET Feedback Report from the spring, which is provided by the district coordinator.


Fidelity time frame is set up yearly by PBIS Coaches and LEA Coordinator.


Installation

Fostering Communication

  • Build communication avenues with staff about implementation. (Colvin & Sprick, 1999)

  • Communicate team discussions/decisions regularly with all staff members. (Kaster, 2005; Bohannon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)

  • Provide feedback and reinforcement to staff regarding implementation efforts. (Kaster, 2005).


Installation

Creating the Climate

  • Use surveys to establish and maintain buy-in. (Kaster, 2005; George & Martinez, 2007)

  • Identify teacher leaders and motivators.

  • Build relationships.

  • Provide faculty reinforcements and incentives.

  • Develop leadership skills.


Installation

Creating the Climate (cont.)

  • Identify barriers. (Kaster, 2005; Kincaid, Childs, Wallace & Blasé, 2007)

  • Understand staff perceptions. (Kaster, 2005; Feuerborn, 2011)


Creating the Climate (cont.)

Strategies for Building Staff Buy In (Feuerborn, 2011)

Build a case for change

Provide evidence

Build administrative supports

Build knowledge

Build on existing capacity

Nature vs. nurture

Build a shared vision

Build opportunities for dialogue

Build ownership

Installation


Initial Implementation

Administrator Focus:Initial Implementation Stage


Initial Implementation

Supporting Team Implementation

  • Establish systems to monitor and collect data regarding implementation and outcomes. (Colvin & Sprick, 1999)

  • Identify funding sources to support implementation. (McKevitt & Braaksma, 2007)


Initial Implementation

Establishing the Vision

Anticipate the resource needs of the team, long-term and short-term. (Kaster, 2005; Bohanon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)

  • Use Self-Assessment Survey, Implementation Inventory and SET to drive action plan.

  • Plan for next year during current year.

  • Long-term goals should be driven by data.


Initial Implementation

Fostering Communication

  • Build avenues to communicate with staff about implementation. (Colvin & Sprick, 1999)

  • Provide leadership by communicating team discussions/decisions regularly with all staff members. (Kaster, 2005; Bohannon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)

  • Provide feedback and reinforcement to staff regarding implementation efforts. (Kaster, 2005).


Initial Implementation

Supporting the Climate

  • Use surveys to maintain buy-in. (Kaster, 2005; George & Martinez, 2007)

  • Share data regularly to demonstrate progress towards goals or need to change strategy.


Full Implementation

Administrator Focus: Full Implementation Stage


Full Implementation

Supporting Team Implementation

  • Principal ensures decision-making is data driven. (Bohannon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)

  • Provide professional development opportunities for staff and PBIS team members. (McKevitt & Braaksma, 2007; Kincaid, Childs, Wallace & Blasé, 2007)


Full Implementation

Facilitating Leadership

  • Guide rather than dictate. (Colvin, & Sprick, 1999)

  • Shared leadership results in stronger teacher working relationships and higher student achievement.

  • Leaders impact student achievement primarily through their influence on teachers’ motivation and working conditions. (Lewis, Leithwood, Wahlstrom, & Anderson, 2010)


Full Implementation

Maintaining the Vision

Coach team to using evaluations to action plan, rather than as a “score.”

Clearly define majors/minors across the LEA and train staff members on consistent reporting.

Start conversation about moving from punitive systems of consequences to pyramids of interventions.


Full Implementation

Sustaining Communication

  • Provide leadership by communicating team discussions/decisions regularly with all staff members. (Kaster, 2005; Bohannon-Edmonson, Flannery, Eber & Sugai, 2005)

  • Provide feedback and reinforcement to staff regarding implementation efforts. (Kaster, 2005)


Full Implementation

Sustaining Communication with Stakeholders

http://www.cabarrus.k12.nc.us/domain/1679


Full Implementation

Creating the Climate

  • Use surveys to sustain buy-in. (Kaster, 2005; George & Martinez, 2007)

  • Systematically share data with stakeholders.

  • Reinforce staff for higher level implementation efforts.


Use Surveys to Sustain Buy-In


Use Surveys to Sustain Buy-In


Use Surveys to Sustain Buy-In


Full Implementation

Systematically Share Data with Stakeholders


Full Implementation

Reinforce Staff for Higher Level Implementation Efforts

  • Teacher Tokens

  • Every staff member will get paper “tokens” that they will carry in their clear nametag holder.

  • When you see another staff member correcting a students behavior in a positive way, you will give them a token.

  • Write your name on the token and be entered for a drawing each month!

  • Prizes can be duty free recess, order your lunch out, have an administrator do an interactive read-aloud in your class, etc.

  • WHAT IS THE LANGUAGE TO USE WHEN YOU ARE CORRECTING A STUDENT?

  • WHAT WERE YOU DOING?WHAT ARE YOU SUPPOSED TO BE DOING?

  • SHOW ME.

PBIS TOKEN

PBIS TOKEN


Full Implementation

Considering Policies and Procedures (Kaster, 2005)

  • Braid with other initiatives under school improvement.

  • Sustain successful strategies by writing into policy.

  • Re-work hiring policies (staff who support PBIS). (McKevitt & Braaksma, 2007)

  • Distribute PBIS handbook. (McKevitt & Braaksma, 2007)

  • Adapt and modify implementation to facilitate new implementation strategies.

  • Use data to monitor and evaluate strategies.


Braiding PBIS and RtI


Full Implementation

Braiding PBIS and RtI

  • During the 2012-2013 school year, a problem-solving team was created at every school in Cabarrus County.

  • These problem solving teams attended Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) training over the course of the year.

  • Teams used the TIPS model and meeting foundations to design academic and behavioral interventions for individual students.

  • A coaching and support model was created, as well as process checks and fidelity checks for the teams.


Reading and Math Workshops

Universal Screening with AIMSweb

Benchmarking with Discovery Education

F & P Running Record

Teaching & Re-teaching of Expectations & Rules

Acknowledgement System: Individual & Class

Consistent Minor & Major Definitions and Procedures for Problem Behavior

Next Step: Function Based Interventions for Problem Behavior


Full Implementation

Sustain Successful Strategies by Writing into Policy

District Discipline Data System

  • Collaborated with administrators, LEA Accountability and Administrative Services Departments for consistency.

  • Created and began implementing communication plan for August through December.

  • Goal is consistent data entry across district by January 2014.


Q and A


Conclusion

Moving Forward

  • Complete Implementation Stage Self-Assessment.

    http://sisep.fpg.unc.edu/resources/stages-implementation-analysis-where-are-we

    • Complete Driver Analysis. http://sisep.fpg.unc.edu/learning-zone/science-of-implementation/implementation-frameworks/drivers

  • Document 3 action items to support PBIS Implementation in your school or LEA.


References

  • Bohanon-Edmonson, H., Flannery, K.B., Eber, L., & Sugai, G. (Ed.). (2005). Positive Behavior Support in high schools: Monograph from the 2004 Illinois High School Forum of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, Revised 2005. Retrieved from: http://www.pbis.org/common/pbisresources/publications/PBSMonographComplete.pdf

  • Colvin, G., & Sprick, R. (1999). Providing administrative leadership for effective behavior support: Ten strategies for principals. Effective School Practices, 17, 65-71.

  • Feuerborn, L. (2011). School-wide Positive Behavior Supports: Facilitating staff buy-in. Presented at the NW PBIS Conference, Eugene, Oregon. Retrieved from: http://www.pbisnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Facilitating-Staff-Buy-In-Handouts-Feuerborn-2.6.pdf

  • George, H, and Martinez, S. (2007). How to get PBIS in your school. PBIS Newsletter, 4(1). Retrieved from: http://www.pbis.org/pbis_newsletter/volume_4/issue1.aspx


References (cont.)

  • Kaster, B. (2005). Administrative support and roles for implementation of Positive Behavior Support in high school. In H. Bohanon-Edmonson, K. B. Flannery, L. Eber, and G. Sugai (Eds.), Positive Behavior Support in High Schools: Monograph from the 2004 Illinois High School Forum of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, Revised 2005 (pp 25-34). Retrieved from: http://www.pbis.org/common/pbisresources/publications/PBSMonographComplete.pdf

  • Kincaid, D., Childs, K., Wallace, F., & Blase, F. (2007). Identifying barriers and facilitators in implementing School-wide Positive Behavior Support. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 9(3), 174-184.

  • Louis, K. S., Leithwood, K., Wahlstrom, K. L., & Anderson, S. E. (2010). Investigating the links to improved student learning: Final report of research findings to the Wallace Foundation. Retrieved from University of Minnesota Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement: http://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/school-leadership/key-research/Documents/Investigating-the-Links-to-Improved-Student-Learning.pdf

  • McKevitt, B., & Braaksma, A. (2007). Best practices in developing a Positive Behavior Support system at the school level. In A. Thomas & J. Grimes (Eds.), Best practices in school psychology (5th Ed.). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists, 737-747.


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