Work-Life Means Business

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Agenda. Alliance for Work-Life Progress @ WorldatWorkWork-Life Effectiveness: The PortfolioMyths, Realities and Cultural ChallengesThe Payback of Effective WorkplacesA Closer Look at Workplace FlexibilityCase Studies. Alliance for Work-Life Progress. MissionTo provide premier professional educ

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Work-Life Means Business

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1. Work-Life Means Business WorldatWork (www.worldatwork.org) is an international association of human resources professionals focused on attracting, motivating and retaining employees. Founded in 1955, WorldatWork provides practitioners with knowledge leadership to effectively implement total rewards – compensation, benefits, work-life, performance and recognition, development and career opportunities – by connecting employee engagement to business performance. WorldatWork supports its 30,000 members and customers in 30 countries with thought leadership, education, publications, research and certification. WorldatWork (www.worldatwork.org) is an international association of human resources professionals focused on attracting, motivating and retaining employees. Founded in 1955, WorldatWork provides practitioners with knowledge leadership to effectively implement total rewards – compensation, benefits, work-life, performance and recognition, development and career opportunities – by connecting employee engagement to business performance. WorldatWork supports its 30,000 members and customers in 30 countries with thought leadership, education, publications, research and certification.

2. Agenda Alliance for Work-Life Progress @ WorldatWork Work-Life Effectiveness: The Portfolio Myths, Realities and Cultural Challenges The Payback of Effective Workplaces A Closer Look at Workplace Flexibility Case Studies

3. Alliance for Work-Life Progress Mission To provide premier professional education, knowledge and community to individuals and organizations that are focused on creating healthy, productive and engaged work environments by supporting the dual agenda of everyone who works.

4. AWLP Key Milestones and Initiatives Founded in 1996 Defining work-life best practice, research and emerging talent Work-Life Innovative Excellence Award Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Life Research Work-Life Rising Star Recognition Award

5. Key Initiatives and Milestones Part of WorldatWork since 2003 Work-Life Certification WLCP -- A new designation of WorldatWork Society of Certified Professionals National Work and Family Month Congressional Resolutions in 2003 & 2008

6. Total Rewards

8. Work-Life Effectiveness Work-life effectiveness is first and foremost a business strategy that recognizes the benefits to the bottom line of taking a holistic view of the workforce. By that I mean respecting people as whole, integrated beings, who bring much more to the workplace every day than their job description would indicate. If You’ve Raised Kids, You Can Manage Anything, Ann Critteneden, Award-winning journalist and Pulitzer Prize nominee Integrating connections and relationships that are mutually beneficial; supporting the intersections between the individual and his/her family (core unit of society), the community (from which companies draw their labor force as well as their customers and general reputation), and the workplace. Work-life effectiveness is first and foremost a business strategy that recognizes the benefits to the bottom line of taking a holistic view of the workforce. By that I mean respecting people as whole, integrated beings, who bring much more to the workplace every day than their job description would indicate. If You’ve Raised Kids, You Can Manage Anything, Ann Critteneden, Award-winning journalist and Pulitzer Prize nominee Integrating connections and relationships that are mutually beneficial; supporting the intersections between the individual and his/her family (core unit of society), the community (from which companies draw their labor force as well as their customers and general reputation), and the workplace.

9. Basic Work-Life Premise Respecting people for who they are – not just for what they do or produce – pays off for all stakeholders: employers, employees, customers, shareholders, families, and communities. The organizational outcomes of doing so are measurable, using a blend of quantitative and qualitative metrics

11. Persistence of Resistance

12. Myths and Misconceptions It’s too expensive It’s only for big companies Only slackers use work-life solutions It’s “soft”; impact can’t be measured It’s unnecessary; peripheral to business success Let’s ditch it now that we’re in trouble What else have you heard? Unfortunately, the short history of work-life harmony has been plagued by more than its share of myths and misconceptions. Here is a short list of the most common objections. The last point arises in part because work-life has not been the source of compliance activity. This is changing. Family Responsibility Discrimination. Unfortunately, the short history of work-life harmony has been plagued by more than its share of myths and misconceptions. Here is a short list of the most common objections. The last point arises in part because work-life has not been the source of compliance activity. This is changing. Family Responsibility Discrimination.

13. Core Beliefs About the Nature of People Are a Challenge Dissectible, interchangeable, at rest unless externally controlled People who care are worth less in the labor market than others 3 cultural norms (with resulting penalties) Motherhood Ideal worker Individualism / Government has no business supporting those who carePeople who care are worth less in the labor market than others 3 cultural norms (with resulting penalties) Motherhood Ideal worker Individualism / Government has no business supporting those who care

14. Facts and Realities Myth: Supporting Work-Life Is Too Expensive Fact: The Complete Portfolio Runs Between 2-5% of HR budget Why? -- Few direct costs associated with workplace flexibility There is a very high cost of doing nothing

15. Facts and Realities …cont’d Myth: Size (of Employer) Matters Fact: Small enterprises have a distinct advantage Two national initiatives focus on small firms DOL FlexOptions Project FWI /Alfred P. Sloan Foundation When Work Works initiative

16. Facts and Realities …cont’d Myth: Only Slackers Are Interested Fact: Top performers value flexibility and are among the most avid users of work-life support Majority of today’s workforce doesn’t have a choice “Dual-focus” workers predominate 3:1

17. The 21st Century Workforce … Diverse and Complex Dual-focus workers with no “invisible” partner at home Most (53%) have children or elders in their care Career interruptions and episodes of less than full-time work 53% of ees are actively caring for children and/or elders while they work. Most adults work full time Care responsibilities are quite demanding…1 in 5 elder adults has Alzheimers or dementia. Median household income is $42K (2000), so most cannot ‘contract out’ the care responsibilities…nor can they do it outside of work hours. Mothers of children under 18 are now employed at the same rate as men 53% of ees are actively caring for children and/or elders while they work. Most adults work full time Care responsibilities are quite demanding…1 in 5 elder adults has Alzheimers or dementia. Median household income is $42K (2000), so most cannot ‘contract out’ the care responsibilities…nor can they do it outside of work hours. Mothers of children under 18 are now employed at the same rate as men

18. Facts and Realities Myth: Work-Life Is A Trivial Pursuit Fact: Quantification of work-life impact abounds The business case is established Foundational to being an “employer of choice” Myth #1: It’s too expensive There are at least two responses to this objection. First of all, according to my calculations (which I invite you to investigate), even at the biggest, richest multinational organizations, support for work-life harmony averages between 2-5% of the total HR budget. Given the positive impact on ROI that accrues from any one of the seven categories of support for work-life initiatives, the cost is relatively insignificant and should be considered a (long-term) investment in human capital. The alternative is not to take action in support of work-life harmony. This approach has been demonstrated time and again to backfire in the medium to long-run, often causing the application of more expensive remedies than a steady course of support would have cost in the first place. One potential cost is the [erosion] loss of valuable (perhaps irreplaceable) talent, since top performers are more sensitive to the lack of family and employee-friendly policies and practices than mediocre employees and are the most likely to leave unsupportive employers. Another cost can be a lessening of morale and motivation over time as employees feel their basic needs aren’t being met or they are not being challenged on the job to use all of their personal and professional competencies. Myth #4: It’s soft; can’t be measured The Metrics Manual: 10 Ways to Measure the Impact of Work-Life Initiatives Burud and Tomolo’s book containing findings of 550 studies from around the globe Myth #1: It’s too expensive There are at least two responses to this objection. First of all, according to my calculations (which I invite you to investigate), even at the biggest, richest multinational organizations, support for work-life harmony averages between 2-5% of the total HR budget. Given the positive impact on ROI that accrues from any one of the seven categories of support for work-life initiatives, the cost is relatively insignificant and should be considered a (long-term) investment in human capital. The alternative is not to take action in support of work-life harmony. This approach has been demonstrated time and again to backfire in the medium to long-run, often causing the application of more expensive remedies than a steady course of support would have cost in the first place. One potential cost is the [erosion] loss of valuable (perhaps irreplaceable) talent, since top performers are more sensitive to the lack of family and employee-friendly policies and practices than mediocre employees and are the most likely to leave unsupportive employers. Another cost can be a lessening of morale and motivation over time as employees feel their basic needs aren’t being met or they are not being challenged on the job to use all of their personal and professional competencies. Myth #4: It’s soft; can’t be measured The Metrics Manual: 10 Ways to Measure the Impact of Work-Life Initiatives Burud and Tomolo’s book containing findings of 550 studies from around the globe

19. Fortune “100 Best” vs. Stock Market 1998-2007

20. Key Links Between Total Rewards, Work-Life and Shareholder Value And here you can see how the dimensions stack up. Specific HR practices that have a positive impact on shareholder value creation. This relationship is so clear that a significant improvement in these 43 practices is associated with a 47% increase in market value. The key dimensions are: Total Rewards & Accountability Collegial/Flexible Workplace Recruiting and Retention Excellence Communications Integrity Focused HR Services Technology, and Same as webcast #1, page 19 And here you can see how the dimensions stack up. Specific HR practices that have a positive impact on shareholder value creation. This relationship is so clear that a significant improvement in these 43 practices is associated with a 47% increase in market value. The key dimensions are: Total Rewards & Accountability Collegial/Flexible Workplace Recruiting and Retention Excellence Communications Integrity Focused HR Services Technology, and Same as webcast #1, page 19

22. Empirical Definition of an Effective Workplace Job autonomy Involvement in management decision-making Challenging work and continuous learning Supervisors support employees’ success on the job Co-worker support Workplace flexibility Minimization of status distinctions Source: Families and Work Institute, Watson Wyatt Flexibility is linked to engagement, retention, job satisfaction, and employee well-being. To assess the impact of having an effective workplace on employee engagement and commitment, job satisfaction, retention, and mental health, FWI created an average rating for the six criteria of an effective workplace Flexibility is linked to engagement, retention, job satisfaction, and employee well-being. To assess the impact of having an effective workplace on employee engagement and commitment, job satisfaction, retention, and mental health, FWI created an average rating for the six criteria of an effective workplace

23. Employees in an Effective Workplace … Are more likely to be engaged in and committed to their jobs Exhibit higher levels of job satisfaction Want to remain with their employers Have better health

24. Engagement Levels At a Low Ebb

25. Reduced Aspirations Fewer employees today want to move into positions of greater responsibility. 67% of young men (under 29) wanted to move into jobs with more responsibility in 2008 vs. 80% in 1992 66% of young women wanted to move into jobs with more responsibility in 2008 vs. 72% in 1992

26. A Shift in Focus … (FWAs) Evolving the new employment contract Delivering on the (virtual) promise that technology offers for mass customization of how, when and where work gets done Managing flexibly for the 21st century workforce Men are more involved in the care of children, according to their wives 1992 vs. 2002 24% vs. 30% Husband takes greater or equal responsibility for the care of children Gen-X fathers are leading this trend. They spend significantly more time doing things and caring for their children than Boomer fathers with children of the same ages – an average of 3.4 hours per workday vs. an average of 2.2 hours for Boomer fathers (Rewards) Increased collaboration and integration Breaking down the silos within people functions Moving beyond fiefdoms to designing compelling work environments that deliver on both personal and organizational goals (FWAs) Evolving the new employment contract Delivering on the (virtual) promise that technology offers for mass customization of how, when and where work gets done Managing flexibly for the 21st century workforce Men are more involved in the care of children, according to their wives 1992 vs. 2002 24% vs. 30% Husband takes greater or equal responsibility for the care of children Gen-X fathers are leading this trend. They spend significantly more time doing things and caring for their children than Boomer fathers with children of the same ages – an average of 3.4 hours per workday vs. an average of 2.2 hours for Boomer fathers (Rewards) Increased collaboration and integration Breaking down the silos within people functions Moving beyond fiefdoms to designing compelling work environments that deliver on both personal and organizational goals

27. Work-Life Effectiveness in Action Case Studies The best way to demonstrate how work-life effectiveness operates to produce positive business results is to demonstrate with real examples. I’m going to begin by taking two of the categories of work-life support to illustrate how two highly successful global enterprises have integrated these into their business strategy. Then I will share four “stories of transformation” (Sandy Burud’s phrase)with you from organizations of differing sizes and disparate industries. By the time we have explored these six companies, you will have a better idea why they included work-life effectiveness into their overall business strategy, a few details about how they went about it and what they achieved as a result. Before I embark on this section of my presentation, I would like to emphasize the fact that there are many, many stories I could have chosen – far too many to elaborate here. So I had to be highly selective. My point is, the business case for work-life effectiveness is supported by such an abundance of evidence today that it is virtually unassailable. That leaves us with only the “soft” objections: core beliefs and myths. So let’s get on with exploring how the organizational world really works. The best way to demonstrate how work-life effectiveness operates to produce positive business results is to demonstrate with real examples. I’m going to begin by taking two of the categories of work-life support to illustrate how two highly successful global enterprises have integrated these into their business strategy. Then I will share four “stories of transformation” (Sandy Burud’s phrase)with you from organizations of differing sizes and disparate industries. By the time we have explored these six companies, you will have a better idea why they included work-life effectiveness into their overall business strategy, a few details about how they went about it and what they achieved as a result. Before I embark on this section of my presentation, I would like to emphasize the fact that there are many, many stories I could have chosen – far too many to elaborate here. So I had to be highly selective. My point is, the business case for work-life effectiveness is supported by such an abundance of evidence today that it is virtually unassailable. That leaves us with only the “soft” objections: core beliefs and myths. So let’s get on with exploring how the organizational world really works.

28. GlaxoSmithKline: The Work-Life Portfolio: Dependent Care Principle: 1 size fits 1 Practice: Adult or Elder Caregiving Manager support Time and place flexibility Co-workers’ empathy Results: Loyalty Lower turnover Employer of choice According to the National Study of the Changing Workforce, 17% of the US workforce has significant eldercaregiving responsibilities and another 35% have had similar responsibilities within the past year. Another 21% care for a disabled adult. Over the past 10 years, more GSK employees are experiencing adult and elder care responsibilities. It is increasing by about 1% every year with 11% currently stating they care for an elder and another 13% care for a disabled adult, >18 years old. Our caregivers state that they provide approximately 22 hours per week of care and have done so for the past 6 years and most perceive that the caregiving needs will intensify Most say they are somewhat stressed and many have passed up the opportunity to relocate, be promoted, engage in training or a new assignment. 9% have taken leave. In spite of a myriad of elder care benefits, including onsite case manager consultation, in-home or in-facility assessment and monitoring and subsidized respite and back-up care, caregivers tell us that their most valued work-life benefits include: An understanding manager, especially one that supports making and taking frequent calls at work Understanding coworkers who support their schedules and will “pick up the slack” when needed Reduced hours and flexibility in when and where work is done Employees who have used flexibility for elder or adult care responsibilities do not perceive that using flexibility has hurt their careers and that if they have temporarily slowed the pace of work or workload, that they can get back on their career track anytime One Story: “When I’m not working, I’m commuting the 130-mile distance to visit my elderly parents. I have the flexibility to do this without totally exhausting myself because of the way I’m able to flex my schedule and work a compressed work week. And we can always count on other company-sponsored programs like the eldercare back-up care program if we need someone to be with my parents if I or my brother or sister can’t.” According to the National Study of the Changing Workforce, 17% of the US workforce has significant eldercaregiving responsibilities and another 35% have had similar responsibilities within the past year. Another 21% care for a disabled adult. Over the past 10 years, more GSK employees are experiencing adult and elder care responsibilities. It is increasing by about 1% every year with 11% currently stating they care for an elder and another 13% care for a disabled adult, >18 years old. Our caregivers state that they provide approximately 22 hours per week of care and have done so for the past 6 years and most perceive that the caregiving needs will intensify Most say they are somewhat stressed and many have passed up the opportunity to relocate, be promoted, engage in training or a new assignment. 9% have taken leave. In spite of a myriad of elder care benefits, including onsite case manager consultation, in-home or in-facility assessment and monitoring and subsidized respite and back-up care, caregivers tell us that their most valued work-life benefits include: An understanding manager, especially one that supports making and taking frequent calls at work Understanding coworkers who support their schedules and will “pick up the slack” when needed Reduced hours and flexibility in when and where work is done Employees who have used flexibility for elder or adult care responsibilities do not perceive that using flexibility has hurt their careers and that if they have temporarily slowed the pace of work or workload, that they can get back on their career track anytime One Story: “When I’m not working, I’m commuting the 130-mile distance to visit my elderly parents. I have the flexibility to do this without totally exhausting myself because of the way I’m able to flex my schedule and work a compressed work week. And we can always count on other company-sponsored programs like the eldercare back-up care program if we need someone to be with my parents if I or my brother or sister can’t.”

29. GlaxoSmithKline: The Work-Life Portfolio: Flexibility Principle: Agile business model Practice: Part-time salesforce 25 hours/week Full benefits (prorated) Retired or stay-at-home moms with experience in pharma sales Results: Decreased cost Extreme flexibility and creativity Lower turnover/job satisfaction Better or equal sales For 15 years, we’ve had a small (200) consumer-products, professional salesforce composed primarily of working mothers and retired pharmaceutical professionals. A few of these reps work full-time because their territory has a higher concentration of physicians. 85% are women between the ages of 28-40 and almost all of them had previous experience in pharmaceutical sales. They take their children to school, call on several MDs during the day, and are home when their children arrive home from school, are home sick or have a special school function. They work 25 hours/wk and call on physicians…they schedule the 25 hours to meet their family’s and customer’s needs. They receive full medical, dental and drug coverage for them selves and their family. They receive prorated life insurance, pension, and 401(k). They have a company car and laptop. Because they have sales experience, their training is less arduous. Recruiting costs are less because there is usually an experienced person waiting in line for a vacancy. Because of less turnover, they know their customers well and have trusting relationships with them, and their sales are better or definitely the same as that of the full-time salesforce. Because of their experience, this salesforce turns on a dime: Their adaptability and creativity allows them to be calling on physicians and pharmacists during one hour, launching a new product the next, or providing community service on smoking cessation or helping a product move from a professional drug to an over-the-counter. They change as the demands change. Their professional measurement and compensation is based on performance, goal attainment, adopting company practices and company profit. 1 woman’s story: “We organize this job, so it works for us, rather than working for it. As working mothers, we are expert time managers, organizers, multi-taskers, and diplomats. Most of us have been in our territory long enough to know all the people we call on and have built relationships with them. It’s a lot easier to conduct business that way, regardless of the product we go in with.” Another: “All of us had successful and profitable careers prior to working part time. It is a win-win for both GSK and us. The company has the advantage of our years of experience and business acumen, and in return we are able to continue to grow our skills and have the opportunity to be involved in our children’s lives in a more personal way.”For 15 years, we’ve had a small (200) consumer-products, professional salesforce composed primarily of working mothers and retired pharmaceutical professionals. A few of these reps work full-time because their territory has a higher concentration of physicians. 85% are women between the ages of 28-40 and almost all of them had previous experience in pharmaceutical sales. They take their children to school, call on several MDs during the day, and are home when their children arrive home from school, are home sick or have a special school function. They work 25 hours/wk and call on physicians…they schedule the 25 hours to meet their family’s and customer’s needs. They receive full medical, dental and drug coverage for them selves and their family. They receive prorated life insurance, pension, and 401(k). They have a company car and laptop. Because they have sales experience, their training is less arduous. Recruiting costs are less because there is usually an experienced person waiting in line for a vacancy. Because of less turnover, they know their customers well and have trusting relationships with them, and their sales are better or definitely the same as that of the full-time salesforce. Because of their experience, this salesforce turns on a dime: Their adaptability and creativity allows them to be calling on physicians and pharmacists during one hour, launching a new product the next, or providing community service on smoking cessation or helping a product move from a professional drug to an over-the-counter. They change as the demands change. Their professional measurement and compensation is based on performance, goal attainment, adopting company practices and company profit. 1 woman’s story: “We organize this job, so it works for us, rather than working for it. As working mothers, we are expert time managers, organizers, multi-taskers, and diplomats. Most of us have been in our territory long enough to know all the people we call on and have built relationships with them. It’s a lot easier to conduct business that way, regardless of the product we go in with.” Another: “All of us had successful and profitable careers prior to working part time. It is a win-win for both GSK and us. The company has the advantage of our years of experience and business acumen, and in return we are able to continue to grow our skills and have the opportunity to be involved in our children’s lives in a more personal way.”

30. GlaxoSmithKline: The Work-Life Portfolio: Culture Change Principle: Managing Human Energy Practice: Energy and Resilience Training Individual Organizational Results: 80% decrease in workplace pressures 25% drop in work-life conflict 21% increase in satisfaction with GSK as an employer Five years ago, GSK survey data from multiple sources indicated that our people were perceiving work demands as excessive We had a 78% full engagement gap – Only 22% of the GSK population was highly engaged, resilient and energised One of our Leadership Surveys indicated that our leaders were consistently scoring low on “Leading Self and Others” As alarming was data that indicated that while our key leaders were highly engaged at work, they were compromised in terms work-life balance and energy Some of these same executives were sedentary and had an unhealthy weight From our HRA, we knew that 18.5% of participants were “stressed”, 23% receive < 7 hrs. sleep, 13% are sedentary, 30% unhealthy weight (17% obese). In our business, we did and still don’t perceive that work demands will get less…we anticipate they will become more intense, especially in today’s economy, but what could we do to impact how employees dealt with the workload, their attitude toward the work and their health. In 2003, we launched our Energy and Resilience Initiative. This is a series of interactive and demonstrative workshops, most no longer than 4 hours, that teach both individual and organizational resilience. And we attempt to create a sustainable environments that supports the skills employees learn in the workshops. We want employees to learn how to take care of their: Physical energy…This is your energy tank…Is it full or empty or in between (quantity). This is activity, nutrition, hydration, rest/renewal Emotional energy…This is the quality of your energy…is it positive or negative Mental energy…This is your focus…is it laser or scattered all over Spiritual energy…This is your sense of commitment. Your passion or core values. For teams and their managers, we want to begin a dialog that gives employees permission to clarify objectives and timelines, to experiment with new and better ways of working and to push-back when work and home life are colliding or the hours in the day don’t match with the hours needed to do the work. You see some of our results here. In addition, employees are experiencing less tiredness, anxiety and anger and they are more relaxed, have a more positive attitude and are better able to manage themselves and their lives. 12 months out, 31 % of the participants in our longer energy course for executives say they have sustained all four dimensions of their energy. Our challenge is to help employees better sustain their short-term results in this economy. Story: “When I attended the workshop I was struck by the similarities among the people with whom I attended, even though they came from different divisions of the organization. We had similar problems in our work life, and similar problems in our personal life,” says this mom of two children, and the caregiver for an aging mother who lives nearby. I learned how to change my eating and my activity level. I saw a lot of results – and people noticed. I have more control over my work life because I have more energy, more focus, and I’m able to prioritize better. I have a calmer perspective and I can devote more quality time my work and what’s important to me.” Five years ago, GSK survey data from multiple sources indicated that our people were perceiving work demands as excessive We had a 78% full engagement gap – Only 22% of the GSK population was highly engaged, resilient and energised One of our Leadership Surveys indicated that our leaders were consistently scoring low on “Leading Self and Others” As alarming was data that indicated that while our key leaders were highly engaged at work, they were compromised in terms work-life balance and energy Some of these same executives were sedentary and had an unhealthy weight From our HRA, we knew that 18.5% of participants were “stressed”, 23% receive < 7 hrs. sleep, 13% are sedentary, 30% unhealthy weight (17% obese). In our business, we did and still don’t perceive that work demands will get less…we anticipate they will become more intense, especially in today’s economy, but what could we do to impact how employees dealt with the workload, their attitude toward the work and their health. In 2003, we launched our Energy and Resilience Initiative. This is a series of interactive and demonstrative workshops, most no longer than 4 hours, that teach both individual and organizational resilience. And we attempt to create a sustainable environments that supports the skills employees learn in the workshops. We want employees to learn how to take care of their: Physical energy…This is your energy tank…Is it full or empty or in between (quantity). This is activity, nutrition, hydration, rest/renewal Emotional energy…This is the quality of your energy…is it positive or negative Mental energy…This is your focus…is it laser or scattered all over Spiritual energy…This is your sense of commitment. Your passion or core values. For teams and their managers, we want to begin a dialog that gives employees permission to clarify objectives and timelines, to experiment with new and better ways of working and to push-back when work and home life are colliding or the hours in the day don’t match with the hours needed to do the work. You see some of our results here. In addition, employees are experiencing less tiredness, anxiety and anger and they are more relaxed, have a more positive attitude and are better able to manage themselves and their lives. 12 months out, 31 % of the participants in our longer energy course for executives say they have sustained all four dimensions of their energy. Our challenge is to help employees better sustain their short-term results in this economy. Story: “When I attended the workshop I was struck by the similarities among the people with whom I attended, even though they came from different divisions of the organization. We had similar problems in our work life, and similar problems in our personal life,” says this mom of two children, and the caregiver for an aging mother who lives nearby. I learned how to change my eating and my activity level. I saw a lot of results – and people noticed. I have more control over my work life because I have more energy, more focus, and I’m able to prioritize better. I have a calmer perspective and I can devote more quality time my work and what’s important to me.”

31. Encourage employees to… Go to bed early and wake up early Start the day with a healthy breakfast Eat a balanced, healthy diet Drink 48 – 64 ounces of water daily Take breaks every ninety minutes during work (movement promotes energy) Get some physical activity daily GlaxoSmithKline: Physical Energy Management Strategies You may be saying, “In this economy, we can’t launch a new initiative like this.” I’d challenge that there are simple things that can ease making today’s “do more with less”. You may be saying, “In this economy, we can’t launch a new initiative like this.” I’d challenge that there are simple things that can ease making today’s “do more with less”.

32. Encourage managers to… Take care of themselves and be transparent about their commitment to health Promote walk & talks Give the “Power of Permission” to teams to work out, take a walk, take a lunch break away from the work station Design meetings and agendas that promote energy by allowing for: Designated Energy Breaks every 60 – 90 minutes Healthy meals if catered in; healthy snacks, Plenty of water, eliminate sodas & cookies Allow 1 hour for lunch and indicate first 20 minutes is to allow time for a walk before lunch If the meeting is longer than one day, allow down time between meeting’s end and any evening plans GlaxoSmithKline: Physical Energy Management Strategies cont’d.

33. First Horizon National Corp. Principle: Employees drive customer results Methodology: Culture change Practices: Stock for all employees, including part-time workers “Benefits” – family care; 90% of employees work flexibly Employee-driven work redesign at all levels Results: Double-digit earnings growth 97% customer retention Formerly First Tennessee National Corporation, a Regional Bank Giving employees what they need will increase shareholder value. Formerly First Tennessee National Corporation, a Regional Bank Giving employees what they need will increase shareholder value.

34. SAS Institute Principle: Quality of life is worth more than money Methodology: Focus on the work environment; create a great place to work Practices: 35-hour work weeks; free / inexpensive on-site childcare; on-site health care center; roller blading trails Results: Employee turnover under 5 percent High levels of customer retention Health care costs significantly below industry average Medium-sized Software Firm Medium-sized Software Firm

35. Baxter Healthcare Principle: Business success is built on a foundation of Shared Values – Respect, Responsiveness and Results Methodology: Work and Life Pyramid of Needs as a framework (Koblenz, 2000) Practices: Two-way employment commitment Results: Eight-fold increase in market capitalization over nine years Surpassed most industry and financial benchmarks even during stock market downturn

36. Questions and Comments

37. Thank You! Please visit us! www.worldatwork.org and www.awlp.org

38. References

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