Lhe 3252 teaching the language of poetry
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LHE 3252 Teaching the Language of Poetry. Week 2 Matthew Arnold (1822-1888). Matthew Arnold. English poet and cultural critic Graduated from Oxford in 1848 Published 1 st book of poetry in 1849 Published 2 nd volume of poems in 1850 Become a school inspector form 1851 to 1886

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LHE 3252 Teaching the Language of Poetry

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Lhe 3252 teaching the language of poetry

LHE 3252 Teaching the Language of Poetry

Week 2

Matthew Arnold (1822-1888)


Matthew arnold

Matthew Arnold

  • English poet and cultural critic

  • Graduated from Oxford in 1848

  • Published 1st book of poetry in 1849

  • Published 2nd volume of poems in 1850

  • Become a school inspector form 1851 to 1886

  • Arnold toured the USA in 1883 and 1884 delivering lectures on education, democracy and Ralph Waldo Emerson.


Lhe 3252 teaching the language of poetry

  • Literary career begins in 1849 with the publication of The Strayed Revelle and other poems


Arnold s philosophy

Arnold’s Philosophy

True happiness comes from within, and that people should seek within themselves for good, while being resigned in acceptance of outward things and avoiding the pointless turmoil of the world.

He argues that we should not live in the believe that we shall one day inherit eternal bliss. If we are not happy on earth, we should moderate out desires rather than live in dreams of something that may never be attained


Dover beach 1867

Dover Beach (1867)

The sea is calm to-night.The tide is full, the moon lies fairUpon the straits;--on the French coast the lightGleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!Only, from the long line of sprayWhere the sea meets the moon-blanch'd land,Listen! you hear the grating roarOf pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,At their return, up the high strand,Begin, and cease, and then again begin,With tremulous cadence slow, and bringThe eternal note of sadness in.Ah, love, let us be trueTo one another! for the world, which seemsTo lie before us like a land of dreams,So various, so beautiful, so new,Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;And we are here as on a darkling plainSwept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,Where ignorant armies clash by night.


Lhe 3252 teaching the language of poetry

Sophocles long agoHeard it on the Aegean, and it broughtInto his mind the turbid ebb and flowOf human misery; weFind also in the sound a thought,Hearing it by this distant northern sea.

The Sea of FaithWas once, too, at the full, and round earth's shoreLay like the folds of a bright girdle furl'd.But now I only hearIts melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,Retreating, to the breathOf the night-wind, down the vast edges drearAnd naked shingles of the world.


Lhe 3252 teaching the language of poetry

Ah, love, let us be trueTo one another! for the world, which seemsTo lie before us like a land of dreams,So various, so beautiful, so new,Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;And we are here as on a darkling plainSwept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,Where ignorant armies clash by night.


Discussion

Discussion

  • Stanza 1 describes the night scene of the beach at Dover

  • Stanza 2 the reader hears the sound of the waves and the eternal note of sadness in it

  • Stanza 3 reflects on the good old days and its contrasting Now.

  • Stanza 4 appeals to love as the world is described as a darkling plain that ignites confusion and resulting in ignorant armies clashing with one another.


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