Simple Commitment  but Long Term Challenge: PT and SoTL

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Simple Commitment but Long Term Challenge: PT and SoTL

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1. Simple Commitment but Long Term Challenge: P&T and SoTL Saturday, November 11, 2006 10:15-11:30 David Sill, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs

2. TENURE POLICY AND GUIDELINES, SIUE, OCTOBER 4, 1994, WC#5-91/92  X. Criteria for Evaluating Tenure-Track Faculty To receive a positive recommendation for tenure, a candidate must have demonstrated at least satisfactory potential for continuing contributions to the unit, school or college, and University and at least meritorious performance in teaching, and at least meritorious performance in either scholarship or service and satisfactory performance in the other. 

3. TENURE POLICY AND GUIDELINES, SIUE, OCTOBER 4, 1994, WC#5-91/92  X. Criteria for Evaluating Tenure-Track Faculty To receive a positive recommendation for tenure, a candidate must have demonstrated at least satisfactory potential for continuing contributions to the unit, school or college, and University and at least meritorious performance in teaching, and at least meritorious performance in either scholarship or service and satisfactory performance in the other. 

4. PROMOTION POLICY AND GUIDELINES II. Procedures for Developing School and Unit Promotion Policies A candidate for promotion shall demonstrate, at the level commensurate with rank, at least meritorious performance in teaching, and at least meritorious performance in either scholarship or service and satisfactory performance in the other.

5. PROMOTION POLICY AND GUIDELINES II. Procedures for Developing School and Unit Promotion Policies A candidate for promotion shall demonstrate, at the level commensurate with rank, at least meritorious performance in teaching, and at least meritorious performance in either scholarship or service and satisfactory performance in the other.

6. Once we made the commitment: How would we define meritorious teaching? How could we document it? How could we evaluate it? How could we help faculty to become meritorious teachers?

7. Question? Write a definition for satisfactory teaching (assuming that satisfactory teaching is good teaching).

8. Pair up, share your definitions and then discuss the following questions: How will you know good teaching if you see it? What evidence would you be looking at that would persuade you that someone is a good teacher?

9. Meritorious Teaching What is the difference between satisfactory teaching and meritorious teaching? If we cannot define it, how can we: Document it? Evaluate it?

10. Meritorious Teaching-- so how do we get “more explicit”? How do we define better than good teaching? What evidence should we look at?

11. SOTL History at SIUE Faculty Roles and Responsibilities White Paper and Plan--1995 First Symposium, November 1995 “Peer Review of Teaching” FRR Sponsored Workshops: Steve Dunbar, Course Portfolios Pat Hutchings, Course Portfolios, Peer Review Peter Shedd, Student Interviews (GIFTS) Dan Bernstein, Course Portfolios, Peer review Susan Saltrick, Technology in the Classroom Carol Geary Schneider, Greater Expectations Mary Huber, Balancing Faculty Roles Craig Nelson, Redefining Rigor Campus Conversations

12. Standards of Scholarly Work From Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate, Glassick, Huber and Maeroff. (1997) Clear Goals Adequate Preparation Appropriate methods Significant Results Effective Presentation Reflective Critique

13. Meritorious Teaching How do we define better than good teaching? What evidence should we look at?

14. So how do we make it happen? Discourse communities coalesce around texts—Lee S. Shulman, Course Portfolios What might those texts look like?

15. Library=>Course Reserves=>Course--P&T: PROMOTION AND TENURE Kathleen Bueno--Foreign Language and Literature Catherine Daus—Psychology Seran Doganacy-Aktuna, English Language and Literature Gail Galasko--Dental Medicine Dennis Hostetler--Public Administration and Policy Analysis Majid Molki, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering George Pelekanos, Mathematics and Statistics Andy Pomerantz—Psychology Cynthia Schmidt, Nursing Ivy Schroeder--Art and Design Michael Shaw, Chemistry Mickey Stanley, Nursing Laura Strand--Art and Design Kathleen Tunney, Social Work Robert Ware--Philosophical Studies Jerry Weinberg--Computer Science Bin Zhou--Geography

16. So how do we make it happen? “Developing Discourse Communities Around the Scholarship of Teaching” Mary Taylor Huber “The scholarship of teaching can flourish only with the development of communities of scholars who share, critique, and build upon each other’s work.”

17. John Swayles, Genre Analysis: English in Academic and Research Settings (Quoted in Huber) A discourse community has: A broadly agreed upon set of common public goals, Mechanisms of intercommunication among its members, Participatory mechanisms to provide information and feedback, One or more genres in the communicative furtherance of its aims, Acquired some specific lexis, and A threshold level of members with suitable expertise.

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