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Reading German Script Part I. Reading German Script Part I. Systematic learning and support. Systematic learning and support. Author Norbert Willmann www.nw-service.at. Translated by Iris Luschin Fuchs. Reading German Script.

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Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Part I

Reading German Script

Part I

Systematic learning and support

Systematic learning and support

Author Norbert Willmann www.nw-service.at

TranslatedbyIris Luschin Fuchs


Lesen

Reading German Script

Under http://matricula-online.eu/the following register can be found.

St. Georgen am Walde, Trauungsbuch 1649-1692, Februar 1653 page 00008.jpg

It is not necessary to learn one of the old scripts beforehand, such as Kurrent, Süterlin, etc.

This script has similarities with many scripts, some Latin, some letters are from the old German script, and some were invented by the scribe.

Lesen


Lesen1

Reading German Script

Under http://matricula-online.eu/the following register can be found.

St. Georgen am Walde, Trauungsbuch 1649-1692, Februar 1653 page 00008.jpg

Some pages later another scribe may have done his work, at this point it is then necessary to start over with deciphering this new script.

This presentation will show how this can be done.

Lesen


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Under http://matricula-online.eu/the following register can be found.

St. Georgen am Walde, Trauungsbuch 1649-1692, Februar 1653 page 00008.jpg

This page illustrates the process of learning 300-year-old script.


Lesen2

Reading German Script

Under http://matricula-online.eu/the following register can be found.

St. Georgen am Walde, Trauungsbuch 1649-1692, Februar 1653 page 00008.jpg

This page illustrates the process of learning 300-year-old script.

Lesen

First of all, the recording system of these entries must be identified.

According to the entries in the register these are marriage records.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

In former times, registers were kept simply in chronological order.


Lesen3

Reading German Script

In former times, registers were kept simply in chronological order.

In the left example you can see the date. The first legible entry is 18 February.

Lesen


Lesen4

Reading German Script

In former times, registers were kept simply in chronological order.

In the left example you can see the date. The first legible entry is 18 February.

The obvious 4 entries are framed.

Lesen


Lesen5

Reading German Script

In former times, registers were kept simply in chronological order.

In the left example you can see the date. The first legible entry is 18 Februar.

The obvious 4 entries are framed.

Lesen

Idem, Eodem, Eadem in registers derives from the Latin ‘idem’, meaning ‘the same’ or ‘same’. In this example ‘the same date’, thus 18 Feb.

This is the fifth legible entry on this page, however with little data.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now the structure of the entry will be examined more closely. We cannot assume that all entries will have been kept in the same manner, as we will see later on.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now the structure of the entry will be examined more closely. We cannot assume that all entries will have been kept in the same manner, as we will see later on.

18 February Copulti (bride and groom) sunt (that are)


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now the structure of the entry will be examined more closely. We cannot assume that all entries will have been kept in the same manner, as we will see later on.

18 February Copulti(bride and groom) sunt(that are) JoannesMagenpaursoluty(abbreviation for solutus = unmarried man) et (and)


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now the structure of the entry will be examined more closely. We cannot assume that all entries will have been kept in the same manner, as we will see later on.

18 February Copulti(bride and groom) sunt(that are) JoannesMagenpaursoluty(abbreviation for solutus = unmarried man) et (and) Catharina Moserinsoluta(single woman),


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now the structure of the entry will be examined more closely. We cannot assume that all entries will have been kept in the same manner, as we will see later on.

18 February Copulti(bride and groom) sunt(that are) JoannesMagenpaursoluty(abbreviation for solutus = unmarried man) et (and) Catharina Moserinsoluta(single woman), testes (witnesses):


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now the structure of the entry will be examined more closely. We cannot assume that all entries will have been kept in the same manner, as we will see later on.

18 February Copulti(bride and groom) sunt(that are) JoannesMagenpaursoluty(abbreviation for solutus = unmarried man) et (and) Catharina Moserinsoluta(single woman), testes (witnesses): Georg Staindl


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now the structure of the entry will be examined more closely. We cannot assume that all entries will have been kept in the same manner, as we will see later on.

18 February Copulti(bride and groom) sunt(that are) JoannesMagenpaursoluty(abbreviation for solutus = unmarried man) et (and) Catharina Moserinsoluta(single woman), testes (witnesses): Georg Staindljudge at Neukirch et (and) GeorgiusMagenpaur


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here are the details of the spelling of the given name ‘Georg’. The first letter seems

More like a ‘B’ than a ‘G’.

Below an excerpt of a script sampler showing all ‘Gs’ of the 17th and 18th cent., many of them resemble a ‘B’ much more than a ‘G’.

So concerning the initial letter let it be said that there is no ‘Beorg’ but only a ‘Georg’. For more details see the next slide.

Script sampler download: http://www.nw-service.at/zip/41-Alte-schriften.pdf


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here are the details of the spelling of the given name ‘Georg’. The first letter seems

More like a ‘B’ than a ‘G’.

With this name it is easier to start with the spelling at the end. The ‘g’ at the end can be clearly read, as well as the ‘r’ preceding it. An ‘rg’ at the end of a name only applies to ‘Georg’ (or is variation ‘Georgius’).

Another detail: in this script we can actually read ‘Geörg’. This peculiarity of Umlauts is also found with ‘a’, resp. ‘ä’, in the geographic area north of the Danube. The ‘a’ in the word ‘hard’ is pronounced with an open ‘a’ in dialect. The ‘a’ in ‘talk’ is pronounced with the mouth closed a bit more, thus the ‘ä’ in ‘Härtl’ indicates an open ‘a’.


Lesen6

Reading German Script

When learning to read script, it is easier to start with the given name and to pay

special attention tothe initial letter and any double letters.

From the aforementioned structure the given name is easily detected.

Lesen


Lesen7

Reading German Script

When learning to read script, it is easier to start with the given name and to pay

special attention tothe initial letter and any double letters.

From the aforementioned structure the given name is easily detected.

Lesen

All first or given names are now framed. Everyone can now attempt to read the names.

Some are more easily read, while others are quite difficult to identify.


Lesen8

Reading German Script

When learning to read script, it is easier to start with the given name and to pay

special attention tothe initial letter and any double letters.

Matthias, Johannes, Catharina, Georg, Georgius, Paulus, Catharina,

Zacharias, Martha, Philip, Martin,

Urban, Maria,

Georg, Jacob, Thomas,

Fridrich, Magdalena, Ulrich, Carl

Lesen


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

When learning to read script, it is easier to start with the given name and to pay

special attention tothe initial letter and any double letters.

The names Matthias, Martha and Martin, Maria Magdalena all help us recognize how the scribe of the register wrote the ‘M’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

When learning to read script, it is easier to start with the given name and to pay

special attention tothe initial letter and any double letters.

The names Matthias, Martha and Martin, Maria Magdalena all help us recognize how the scribe of the register wrote the ‘M’.

Using Catharina (2x)

and Carl, the ‘C’ can be identified.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

First of all, the recording system of these entries must be identified. According to the entries in the register these are marriage records.

So when the bride and groom went to register their marriage, they were asked their names. Whatever the priest audibly understood, he wrote down. For this reason spelling of family names can differ from one entry to the next.

In the entry framed here, the priest only noted the names of the bride and groom -- no location, no witnesses.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now some distinctive features of this script. Let’s look at the ‘h’, often used in

connection with ‘t’ as in ‘th’, or with ‘c’ as in ‘ch’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now some distinctive features of this script. Let’s look at the ‘h’, often used in

connection with ‘t’ as in ‘th’, or with ‘c’ as in ‘ch’.

In this slide we see the ‘u’ with a curved line above it framed in blue.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now some distinctive features of this script. Let’s look at the ‘h’, often used in

connection with ‘t’ as in ‘th’, or with ‘c’ as in ‘ch’.

In this slide we see the ‘u’ with a curved line above it framed in blue. However in the word ‘Paulus’ (red) the line above the ‘u’ is missing, as this name is written in ‘pure’ Latin script. In Latin the ‘u’ has no curved line or check above it.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now some distinctive features of this script. Let’s look at the ‘h’, often used in

connection with ‘t’ as in ‘th’, or with ‘c’ as in ‘ch’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now some distinctive features of this script. Let’s look at the ‘h’, often used in

connection with ‘t’ as in ‘th’, or with ‘c’ as in ‘ch’.

We can distinguish between two ‘h’s: the small ‘h’ as in ‘Catharina’, ‘Zacharias’, and ‘Martha’, and the long ‘h’ as in ‘Philip’, ‘Holzmül’, ‘Neuhauser’, ‘Thomas’, ‘Pichler’, ‘Richter’ and ‘allhir’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now some distinctive features of this script. Let’s look at the ‘h’, often used in

connection with ‘t’ as in ‘th’, or with ‘c’ as in ‘ch’.

We can distinguish between two ‘h’s: the small ‘h’ as in ‘Catharina’, ‘Zacharias’, and ‘Martha’, and the long ‘h’ as in ‘Philip’, ‘Holzmül’, ‘Neuhauser’, ‘Thomas’, ‘Pichler’, ‘Richter’ and ‘allhir’.

As we can see in the word ‘Aschauerin’ (red), in the ‘sch’ the long ‘h’ is used as well.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

In another example we try to read a given name with an ‘h’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

In another example we will try to read a given name with an ‘h’.

In the blue frame we can clearly see the ‘h’ as the second letter.

Again we will try to spell out the name starting with the last letter and going backward. We have not yet touched on the ‘s’, but the last letter is a round ‘s’. Before that there is an ‘o’ or an ‘a’, then a very legible ‘m’, then a very clear ‘o’ and before that an ’h’. All that sums up to ‘homos’ or ‘homas’ – the only thing that makes sense is ‘Thomas’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

In another example we will try to read a given name with an ‘h’.

In the blue frame we can clearly see the ‘h’ as the second letter.

Even though the initial letter can be made out from the rest of the letters, a look to the script sampler confirms the written ‘T’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is another example of a name with an ‘h’ and two ‘u’ each with a curve above it.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is another example of a name with an ‘h’ and two ‘u’ each with a curve above it.

The name occurs twice, this provides a good comparison.

We start with the already known ‘h’. Then there is an ‘a’ and a ‘u’, thus a ‘au’. Then we see a long ‘s’ and the last letter is an ‘r’. The letter before the last is an ‘e’, pulled down by the long ‘s’.

This results in

‘-hauser’ as the second part of the name.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is another example of a name with an ‘h’ and two ‘u’ each with a curve above it.

The name occurs twice, this provides a good comparison.

Before the ‘h’ is an ‘u’ with a curve and before that an ‘e’, which makes an’eu’. We recognize the initial letter as an ‘N’, which results in the Name ‘Neuhauser’.

The current telephone directory still lists people of that name in St. Georgen am Walde.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is another example of a name with an ‘h’ and two ‘u’ each with a curve above it.

The name occurs twice, this provides a good comparison.

Before the ‘h’ is an ‘u’ with a curve and before that an ‘e’, which makes an’eu’. We recognize the initial letter as an ‘N’, which results in the Name ‘Neuhauser’.

The current telephone directory still lists people of that name in St. Georgen am Walde.

From the script sampler all ’s’, ‘ss’ and ‘ß’. The ‘s’ in ‘hauser’ is similar to the ‘s’ framed in red, only a bit shorter at the top.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is another example of a name with an ‘h’ and two ‘u’ each with a curve above it.

The name occurs twice, this provides a good comparison.

Before the ‘h’ is an ‘u’ with a curve and before that an ‘e’, which makes an’eu’. We recognize the initial letter as an ‘N’, which results in the Name ‘Neuhauser’.

The current telephone directory still lists people of that name in St. Georgen am Walde.

c

From the script sampler all ’s’, ‘ss’ and ‘ß’. The ‘s’ in ‘hauser’ is similar to the ‘s’ framed in red, only a bit shorter at the top. The ‘s’ framed in green are round ‘s’ at the end of a word, as in ‘Thomas’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

A hard-to-read name as a final example.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

A hard-to-read name as a final example. In the last entry, the name of the first

witness is hard to read. As a second or third letter we can recognize an ‘l’.

After that a relatively good ‘r’ and then an ‘i’ , whose dot is hidden in the lower loop of the ‘h’ from ‘alhir’ on the upper line. The result is ‘...lri..’.

In the Genealogie-lexikon(dictionary of Genealogy) among the 20000 terms contained there are only 10 entries which match the search, among them is Ulrich and similar spellings.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

A hard-to-read name as a final example. In the last entry, the name of the first

witness is hard to read. As a second or third letter we can recognize an ‘l’.

After that a relatively good ‘r’ and then an ‘i’ , whose dot is hidden in the lower loop of the ‘h’ from ‘alhir’ on the upper line. The result is ‘...lri..’.

In the Genealogie-lexikon(dictionary of Genealogy) among the 20000 terms contained there are only 10 entries which match the search, among them is Ulrich and similar spellings.

So, the last two letters are a ‘ch’. In the script sampler we find no match for the ‘h’ written very elaborately at the end.

Also for the fancy initial ‘U’ there is no explanation, especially since we can find a ‘U’ in the entry above

and can clearly read it.

Just very creative HANDWRITING!!!


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now to decipher another letter, the ‘p’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now to decipher another letter, the ‘p’. The surname ‘Paur’ is a common name, also

appearing often in compound surnames. Shown here ‘Magenpaur’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now to decipher another letter, the ‘p’. The surname ‘Paur’ is a common name, also

appearing often in compound surnames. Shown here ‘Magenpaur’.

In ‘Philip’ we can also see a ‘p’ as final letter.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now to decipher another letter, the ‘p’. The surname ‘Paur’ is a common name, also

appearing often in compound surnames. Shown here ‘Magenpaur’.

In ‘Philip’ we can also see a ‘p’ as final letter.

The capital ‘P’ ……..


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Now to decipher another letter, the ‘p’. The surname ‘Paur’ is a common name, also

appearing often in compound surnames. Shown here ‘Magenpaur’.

In ‘Philip’ we can also see a ‘p’ as final letter.

The capital ‘P’s are found in ‘Philip’, Pleimbl’,

‘Plindtenhofferin’, ‘Payrederin’, ‘Payrer’ and ‘Pöckh’.

The ‘chk’ combination should be mentioned here. It occurs in ‘Pöckh’ as well in the names ‘Planckh’ and ‘Peckhenbaur’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is the almost complete text:

18 febsCopulatisunt Johannes Magenpaur, soluty et

CahtharinaMoserinsoluta, Testes Georg Staindl

Richter zu Neukirch? et Georgi Magenpaur

---- Idem Paulus Schlager & Catharina …….….

Testes

19. Cop. sunt Zacharias Brazenlecher & Martha Aschauerin

an der Loibn. Testes Philip Pleimbl und Martin

Steiner an der Holzmühl

20.Urban Neuhauser und Maria Plindtenhofferin

JS M (ST): Georg. Testes Jacob Neuhauser und

Thomas Pichler

23.Fridrich Röltinger ?, Richter alhier und Magdalena

Payrederin; Testes Ulrich Payrer und Carl

Röltinger?Pöckh(= Bäcker) alhir

The names with the dots have to be deciphered after comparing them with further

pages of the same scribe, also those with ‘?’. ‘Röltinger’ could also be ‘Nöltinger’.

‘R’ as in ‘Richter’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva, Leopold


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva, Leopold, Wolf


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva, Leopold, Wolf, Gregor


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva, Leopold, Wolf, Gregor, Magdalena


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva, Leopold, Wolf, Gregor, Magdalena, Paulus


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva, Leopold, Wolf, Gregor, Magdalena, Paulus, Anna


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva, Leopold, Wolf, Gregor, Magdalena, Paulus, Anna, Adam.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

A

1. given names: Maria, Georg,

Elisabetha, Paul,

Eva, Leopold, Wolf, Gregor, Magdalena, Paulus, Anna, Adam.

All given names are framed.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month)

The dot on the digit ‘1’ was customary 200 years ago.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized)

the ‘st’ of ‘ist’ is a distinctive type of writing which can also appear at the beginning of words.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized)

the ‘st’ of ‘ist’ is a distinctive type of writing which can also appear at the beginning of words. In ‘worden’ the ‘d’ in the middle is typical and very similar to the ‘d’ in ‘Edlprinz’ (3rd word in the second line), also in ‘des’ and ‘Jaudling’.

The end of ‘worden’ has fallen victim to the scribe’s creativity.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria,

In ‘Maria’ we notice the ‘a’ and the end, as well as the preceding dot on the ‘i’. We can also recognize the ‘r’ in the middle, once we have focused on the name. Later on in this presentation we will look into more detail about identifying names by looking at the script face.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather)

200-300 years ago spelling rules were not really applied, so there were ‘customary’ spellings, which differed by region. ‘Vatter’ with a double t

is still found in ‘Gevatter’ today.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather) Georg Koller

The name ‘Koller’ can be read from the end forward, the inital ‘K’ could also be an ‘R’. In the current telephone directory of Vitis ‘Koller’ ist still a commonly used name.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather) Georg Koller v. (von = from) Edlprinz

When starting research it is best to find out all communities which belonged to a certain parish. For locations in Austria, the program Orte-Austria (German) offers this possibility, and one can generate lists of dependent communities.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather) Georg Koller v. (von = from) EdlprinzUx(Uxor):

In the register this looks like a ‘Vg’ or ‘Vp’ or ‘Vs’, however the second letter is an ’x’. The initial letter appears to be a ‘V’, but actually is an ’U’ (which has nothing to do with ‘Telling someone that an X is a U, which is an old German saying meaning: to pull the wool over someone’s eyes). More on this in slide 73.

However the crucial point here is the meaning of the abbreviation, namely ‘uxor’, which means ‘Wife’ or sometimes ‘married’. This makes sense in front of the name of the wife (see Genealogie-Lexikon (German) a Genealogy Reference Program).


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather) Georg Koller v. (von = from) EdlprinzUx(Uxor):

Elisabetha,


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather) Georg Koller v. (von = from) EdlprinzUx(Uxor):

Elisabetha, des g(e)fatter(father)

For spelling see slide 65.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather) Georg Koller v. (von = from) EdlprinzUx(Uxor):

Elisabetha, des g(e)fatter(father) Paul Digl

The given name ‘Paul’ is easily identified. In ‘Digl’ the single letters are very legible. Whether this name still exists today can be determined with help of a telephone directory; here we have to apply the method of looking for ‘Tigl’, ‘Thigl’ ‘Digl’ and all of these also with ‘ie’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather) Georg Koller v. (von = from) EdlprinzUx(Uxor):

Elisabetha, des g(e)fatter(father) Paul Digl Richter (lawyer) zu Jaudling


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

1. Entry :

Dem 1. dieß(referring to the month) istgetauftworden(is baptized) Maria, vom Vater (fromfather) Georg Koller v. (von = from) EdlprinzUx(Uxor):

Elisabetha, des g(e)fatter(father) Paul Digl Richter (lawyer) zu JaudlingUx: Eva.

‘u ’ and ‘v’ and ‘U ’ and ‘V’ were formerly often written as if there were no differences. We see this in ‘Eva’, where there is a curved line above the ‘v’, which otherwise is only above the ‘u’ (as in ‘getauft’ and ‘Paul’). See (Genealogie-Lexikon a Genealogy Reference Program.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

3. Entry :

Here is a good opportunity to attempt at transcribing the register entry.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Another example from a page of a Birth Register from Vitis, Lower Austria,

November 1710. First, we need to be aware of the structure of the entry.

3. Entry :

And here the solution:

The 18. getauftworden(was christened) Paul, dessen(whose) Vatters(father) Paul Mayr Maurer und Inwohner(mason and inhabitant) zu( to) RuprechtsUx: Anna des gefatter(of the father) Adam Waisshausbesitzig(house owner), Ux: Anna


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

As already mentioned in referring to spelling, there are not set rules. The same applies to the spelling of names. Furthermore, only a few could write and read, and there were no personal identification documents for the common people. When a father came to report the birth of a child to the priest, he was asked his name. Whatever the priest understood he wrote down, and thus it is quite possible that the children of the same family could have surnames with different spelling.

In my own genealogy there was a familie ‘Aleitinger’. This same name is still common in that town today. The spelling of this name for the 10 children includes the following: Aleidinger, Alaidinger, Aleydinger, Aloitinger, Oleitinger, Aleitinger and Oalaitinger. It is as if we can almost hear the dialect pronunciation!

Likewise the spelling of ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ consonants can vary within the same Surname. For example the phonems would pair as: ‘D’ - ‘T’ (Digl – Tikl), ‘B’ – ‘P’ (Binder – Pinter), ‘G’ – ‘K’ (Grug – Kruk), as well as ‘Ö’ – ‘E’ (Eschenau – Öschenau, or Zeller – Zöller).

ThreefurtherexamplesA complicatedexample


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Finally to conclude this part of script identification a note on the script face of names.

Maria Anna

Adam Philip

Eva Barbara

Magdalena Susanna

Georg Gregor

By the ascenders and the descenders in the lettering common names can be identified quite well. This is particular importance when the script is ‘overwritten’ by upper or lower lines, or shines through (mirror-inverted) from a back page.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

For assistance in reading old script:

Schriftenspiegel(script sampler) to recognise letters by comparison

Orte-Austria - Program to search for towns when the name is only partially spelled out as well as a list of dependent communities in a parish and governmental hiarchy.

Genealogielexikon(Genealogical Reference Program) to help clarify identification of persons and Latin terms in the registers, as well as identification of names when the name is only partially legible.

Telefonbuch(Telephone directory) to recognise a surname by comparing it to present-day surnames in a certain location

Anfragen(Queries) Submitting register pages per email with existent transcription attempts

Bildschirmübertragung(Screen sharing) per CrossLoop-Program for joint transcription with simultaneous telephone connection.

Norbert Willmann www.nw-service.at


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

End of Part I

End of Part I

Author: Norbert Willmann [email protected] IIPart IIIBegin

TranslatedbyIris Luschin Fuchs


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

How does the online-support work?

You can obtain additional explanations via telephone or skype. Thus answers or explanations can be transmitted as soon as a question appears.

(1) Send me an email or telephone me at +43 664 53 53 979.

(2) We can make an appointment for an online meeting and at the same time we can settle the technical details.

(3) You download "CrossLoop" (Alternatively "TeamView") to your computer and install it.

With these programs you can see my screen at home and we can look at the presentation synchronously and at the same time have contact via telephone or Skype.

(4) After working together, our screens will again be separated.

Begin presentation

Norbert Willmann [email protected] II, Part III


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

October

Den 1ist getauft wordty(has been baptized ) Barbara desß Vatters (of the father)Adam Ableidinger(Aleitinger) Uxor Maria,von Eilbenbach(Eulenbach), des gefatter(referring to Father) Görg (Georg) PaurUxor Maria von (of ) Eilbenbach(I-dot, Eulenbach)

Den 1 ist getauft wordten(has been baptized ) Catharina, desß Vatters (of the father)adam Pair von Marckhl(Edlprinz) Uxor Juliana, des gefatter(referring to Father) Michael HöfflerUxor Rosina von (of) windigsteig


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Den 4 dito (month as before, October) ist getauft word(has been baptized) Maria desß(of) Vatters (father),Maximilian Pem(Böhm),von (of)Öllbrinz(Edlprinz) Uxor Eva, des (of)gefatter(referring to Father) Hans Kaidz(Kaintz) von (of)Stoeß(I-dot, Stojes) Uxor Maria

back


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

One complicating factor is the entry shining through from the back of the page, which is clearly distinguishable by the direction of the writing.

Usually the writing is tilted toward the right at the top ///////, the writing from the back of the page is tilted toward the left \\\\\\\ and a bit paler. Yet it can still cause some confusion in reading it.

In order to transcribe properly you need to know the structure of the entry:

Date - ‘has been baptized’ - name of the Täuflings (candidate for baptism) - ‘the’ - father of the Täuflings - (occupation of the mother) - mother of the Täufling - ‘of’ - father of the mother - ‘from’ - place – mother of the mother -‘uxor ’


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

First you have to identify:

Februaryas month, apparently added at a later date


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

First you have to identify:

Februaryas month, apparently added at a later date

19 as the date of the day


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

First you have to identify:

Februaryas month, apparently added at a later date

19 as the date of the day

Mariatwice


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

the first line can be recognized:

February

Den 19 dito ist getauft worden Maria, deß

(The 19 Ditto has been baptized Maria, of)


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

The second line starts with the first name of the father. Only the second half of the name is legible --‘laus. The most common given names are ‘Nikolaus’ and “Wenz(es)laus’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

The second line starts with the first name of the father. Only the second half of the name is legible --‘laus. The most common given names are ‘Nikolaus’ and “Wenz(es)laus’.

Knowing this we recognise the first letter as a ‘W’. However we don’t see a ‘z’ with its descender in the middle of the word. So what we can read is ‘Weceslaus’, which is an unusual spelling.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

What follows is the surname of the father. Clearly we can see the ‘P’ at the beginning and the ‘l’ at the end. The name ‘Peichl’ often appears in the town of Heinrichs.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

What follows is the surname of the father. Clearly we can see the ‘P’ at the beginning and the ‘l’ at the end. The name ‘Peichel’ often appears in the town of Heinrichs.

Thus the town ‘Heinrichs’ can be identified. A very creative ‘H’ at the beginning and a ‘chs’ at the end of the word. The town name, Heinreichs, is preceded by ‘Mayr’ (administratorof an estate) ‘in‘.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

At the end of the second line we see the first name of the mother with only the middle part of the word is legible --‘isti’. This occurs only in Christine. So now we can identify the ‘C’ at the beginning, and the rest follows from this, although is not clearly legible.

2nd line: WencelslausPeichel , Mayr ’ in Heinreichs, Christina


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

The 3rd line starts with ‘Uxor, des gefatters’. The ‘des’ is known from the 1st line.

From the first name of the we can read ‘M…hias’, a part of ‘Mathias’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

The 3rd line starts with ‘Uxor, des gefatters’. The ‘des’ is known from the 1st line.

We can read ‘M…hias’ when reading the first name - a part of ‘Mathias’. From the surname which follows we can read ‘…ästinger’ und a capital letter with descender at the beginning of the name. ‘Gastinger’ is a common name in the town, therefore we can identify the ‘G’ at the beginning of the surname.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

At the end of the 3rd line we can identify ‘von’ as a location of the parents.

3rd line: Uxor, des gefatters Mathias Gästinger (Gastinger) von


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

At the beginning of the 4th line ‘Edlbrünz’ (Edlprinz) appears as the location of the parents. Only the end of the word is legible, ‘brünz’, from the knowledge of the places in this area results in ‘Edlprinz’.


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

From the structure

Date – ‘ist getauft worden’(has been baptized) – name of the baptised person – ‘des’(of) – father of the baptised person - occupation of the father – mother of the baptised person – ‘uxor’- father of the mother– ‘von’(from) – place – mother of the mother – ‘uxor’

At the beginning of the 4th line ‘Edlbrünz’ (Edlprinz) appears as the location of the parents. Only the end of the word is legible, ‘brünz’, from the knowledge of the places in this area results in ‘Edlprinz’. Next follows ‘Maria uxor’.

4th row: Edlbrünz, (Edlprinz) Maria uxor


Reading german script part i

Reading German Script

Here is an example of a barely legible from Vitis, Lower Austria

Finishedtranscription:

February

Den 19 dito ist getauft worden Maria, deß

WencelslausPeichel , Mayr in Heinreichs, Christina

Uxor, des gefatters Mathias Gästingervon

Edlbrünz , Maria uxor

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