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ECE 476 POWER SYSTEM ANALYSIS. Lecture 16 Economic Dispatch Professor Tom Overbye Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Announcements. Homework 7 is due now. Be reading Chapter 11, concentrating on sections 11.4 and 11.5 Homework 8 is 11.19, 11.21, 11.26, 11.27

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Ece 476 power system analysis

ECE 476POWER SYSTEM ANALYSIS

Lecture 16Economic Dispatch

Professor Tom Overbye

Department of Electrical andComputer Engineering


Announcements
Announcements

  • Homework 7 is due now.

  • Be reading Chapter 11, concentrating on sections 11.4 and 11.5

  • Homework 8 is 11.19, 11.21, 11.26, 11.27

  • Design Project 2 from the book (page 345 to 348) was due on Nov 15, but I have given you an extension to Nov 29. The Nov 29 date is firm!


Power system economic operation
Power System Economic Operation

  • Power system loads are cyclical. Therefore the installed generation capacity is usually much greater than the current load. This allows options on how to meet the current load

  • Generation costs can vary widely, with different technologies balancing

    • the capital costs necessary to build the generator

    • the costs to actually produce electric power

    • for example, nuclear and some hydro have high capital costs and low operating costs. Natural gas generators have low capital costs, and higher operating costs


Us illinois gen mix energy 2005
US & Illinois Gen Mix (Energy) 2005

  • Gen Type US % Illinois % California%

  • Coal 49.6 47.5 1.1

  • Nuclear 19.3 48.0 18.1

  • Hydro 6.7 0.1 19.8

  • Gas 18.7 3.7 46.7

  • Petroleum 3.0 0.2 1.3

  • Renewable 2.5 0.4 11.8 (14.4 in 1990)

Indiana is 94% coal, while Oregon is 63% hydro(Oregon was 82% hydro in 1990)

Source: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/electricity/st_profiles/toc.html2005 data


Thermal versus hydro generation
Thermal versus Hydro Generation

  • The two main types of generating units are thermal and hydro

  • For hydro the fuel (water) is free but there may be many constraints on operation

    • fixed amounts of water available

    • reservoir levels must be managed and coordinated

    • downstream flow rates for fish and navigation

  • Hydro optimization is typically longer term (many months or years)

  • In 476 we will concentrate on thermal units, looking at short-term optimization


Generator types
Generator types

  • Traditionally utilities have had three broad groups of generators

    • baseload units: large coal/nuclear; always on at max.

    • midload units: smaller coal that cycle on/off daily

    • peaker units: combustion turbines used only for several hours during periods of high demand


Block diagram of thermal unit
Block Diagram of Thermal Unit

To optimize generation costs we need to develop

cost relationships between net power out and operating

costs. Between 2-6% of power is used within the

generating plant; this is known as the auxiliary power


Generator cost curves
Generator Cost Curves

  • Generator costs are typically represented by up to four different curves

    • input/output (I/O) curve

    • fuel-cost curve

    • heat-rate curve

    • incremental cost curve

  • For reference

    • 1 Btu (British thermal unit) = 1054 J

    • 1 MBtu = 1x106 Btu

    • 1 MBtu = 0.29 MWh


I o curve
I/O Curve

  • The IO curve plots fuel input (in MBtu/hr) versus net MW output.


Fuel cost curve
Fuel-cost Curve

  • The fuel-cost curve is the I/O curve scaled by fuel cost. A typical cost for coal is $ 1.70/Mbtu.


Heat rate curve
Heat-rate Curve

  • Plots the average number of MBtu/hr of fuel input needed per MW of output.

  • Heat-rate curve is the I/O curve scaled by MW

Best for most efficient units are

around 9.0


Incremental marginal cost curve
Incremental (Marginal) cost Curve

  • Plots the incremental $/MWh as a function of MW.

  • Found by differentiating the cost curve


Mathematical formulation of costs
Mathematical Formulation of Costs

  • Generator cost curves are usually not smooth. However the curves can usually be adequately approximated using piece-wise smooth, functions.

  • Two representations predominate

    • quadratic or cubic functions

    • piecewise linear functions

  • In 476 we'll assume a quadratic presentation


Coal usage example
Coal Usage Example

  • A 500 MW (net) generator is 35% efficient. It is being supplied with Western grade coal, which costs $1.70 per MBtu and has 9000 Btu per pound. What is the coal usage in lbs/hr? What is the cost?


Wasting coal example
Wasting Coal Example

  • Assume a 100W lamp is left on by mistake for 8 hours, and that the electricity is supplied by the previous coal plant and that transmission/distribution losses are 20%. How much irreplaceable coal has he/she wasted?




Economic dispatch formulation
Economic Dispatch: Formulation

  • The goal of economic dispatch is to determine the generation dispatch that minimizes the instantaneous operating cost, subject to the constraint that total generation = total load + losses

Initially we'll

ignore generator

limits and the

losses


Unconstrained minimization
Unconstrained Minimization

  • This is a minimization problem with a single inequality constraint

  • For an unconstrained minimization a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for a minimum is the gradient of the function must be zero,

  • The gradient generalizes the first derivative for multi-variable problems:


Minimization with equality constraint
Minimization with Equality Constraint

  • When the minimization is constrained with an equality constraint we can solve the problem using the method of Lagrange Multipliers

  • Key idea is to modify a constrained minimization problem to be an unconstrained problem





Minimization with equality constraint1
Minimization with Equality Constraint

  • When the minimization is constrained with an equality constraint we can solve the problem using the method of Lagrange Multipliers

  • Key idea is to modify a constrained minimization problem to be an unconstrained problem





Lambda iteration solution method
Lambda-Iteration Solution Method

  • The direct solution only works well if the incremental cost curves are linear and no generators are at their limits

  • A more general method is known as the lambda-iteration

    • the method requires that there be a unique mapping between a value of lambda and each generator’s MW output

    • the method then starts with values of lambda below and above the optimal value, and then iteratively brackets the optimal value



Lambda iteration graphical view
Lambda-Iteration: Graphical View

In the graph shown below for each value of lambda

there is a unique PGi for each generator. This

relationship is the PGi() function.






Lambda iteration solution method1
Lambda-Iteration Solution Method

  • The direct solution only works well if the incremental cost curves are linear and no generators are at their limits

  • A more general method is known as the lambda-iteration

    • the method requires that there be a unique mapping between a value of lambda and each generator’s MW output

    • the method then starts with values of lambda below and above the optimal value, and then iteratively brackets the optimal value


Generator mw limits
Generator MW Limits

  • Generators have limits on the minimum and maximum amount of power they can produce

  • Often times the minimum limit is not zero. This represents a limit on the generator’s operation with the desired fuel type

  • Because of varying system economics usually many generators in a system are operated at their maximum MW limits.





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