Cats not dogs a different metaphor for achieving critical thinking
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Cats, Not Dogs: A Different Metaphor for Achieving Critical Thinking. Alan Kalish & Kathryn M. Plank Faculty & TA Development The Ohio State University. “You have learned enough to see that cats are much like you and me.” -T.S. Eliot. I. The Metaphor.

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Cats, Not Dogs: A Different Metaphor for Achieving Critical Thinking

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Cats not dogs a different metaphor for achieving critical thinking

Cats, Not Dogs:A Different Metaphor for Achieving Critical Thinking

Alan Kalish & Kathryn M. Plank

Faculty & TA Development

The Ohio State University


You have learned enough to see that cats are much like you and me t s eliot

You have learned enough to see that cats are much like you and me.

-T.S. Eliot

I. The Metaphor


You have learned enough to see that cats are much like you and me t s eliot1

You have learned enough to see that cats are much like you and me.

-T.S. Eliot


Students are more like cats than like dogs

Students are more like cats than like dogs.


1 their response to reward may be predictable

1. Their response to reward may be predictable,


But is often eccentric

but is often eccentric.


2 they have an idiosyncratic interest in topics and activities

2. They have an idiosyncratic interest in topics and activities.


2 they have an idiosyncratic interest in topics and activities1

2. They have an idiosyncratic interest in topics and activities.


2 they have an idiosyncratic interest in topics and activities2

2. They have an idiosyncratic interest in topics and activities.


2 they have an idiosyncratic interest in topics and activities3

2. They have an idiosyncratic interest in topics and activities.


3 they are only occasionally fond of pack activities

3. They are only occasionally fond of pack activities.


3 they are only occasionally fond of pack activities1

3. They are only occasionally fond of pack activities.


3 they are only occasionally fond of pack activities2

3. They are only occasionally fond of pack activities.


4 many have an optimistic sense of their own abilities

4. Many have an optimistic sense of their own abilities.


5 they are comfortable with the status quo

5. They are comfortable with the status quo


5 they are comfortable with the status quo1

5. They are comfortable with the status quo


5 they are comfortable with the status quo2

5. They are comfortable with the status quo


And thus resist change

and thus resist change


6 the desire to please you is usually not sufficient motivation

6. The desire to please you is usually not sufficient motivation.


6 the desire to please you is usually not sufficient motivation1

6. The desire to please you is usually not sufficient motivation.


6 the desire to please you is usually not sufficient motivation2

6. The desire to please you is usually not sufficient motivation.

Feline Haiku #1

Your mouth is moving

Up and down, emitting noise.

Ive lost interest


7 they re more motivated for self generated topics

7. Theyre more motivated for self-generated topics.


7 they re more motivated for self generated topics1

7. Theyre more motivated for self-generated topics.


They like to think it was their own idea

(They like to think it was their own idea.)


8 it can be difficult to read their reactions and understanding

8. It can be difficult to read their reactions and understanding.


8 it can be difficult to read their reactions and understanding1

8. It can be difficult to read their reactions and understanding.


Although not all of the time

(Although not all of the time.)


Although not all of the time1

(Although not all of the time.)


9 whereas dogs acknowledge your authority

9. Whereas dogs acknowledge your authority,


Cats have serious doubts that you know best

cats have serious doubts that you know best.


10 they can be distracted by their social commitments

10. They can be distracted by their social commitments .


10 they can be distracted by their social commitments1

10. They can be distracted by their social commitments .


10 they can be distracted by their social commitments but they are not pack members

10. They can be distracted by their social commitments.But they are NOT pack members.


11 they nap at random intervals

11. They nap at random intervals.


11 they nap at random intervals1

11. They nap at random intervals.


11 they nap at random intervals2

11. They nap at random intervals.


11 they nap at random intervals3

11. They nap at random intervals.


11 they nap at random intervals4

11. They nap at random intervals.


11 they nap at random intervals5

11. They nap at random intervals.

And in odd spots.


11 they nap at random intervals6

11. They nap at random intervals.


Ii motivation

II. Motivation

If a dog jumps into your lap it is because he is fond of you; but if a cat does the same thing it is because your lap is warmer.

-Alfred North Whitehead


Let cats be cats

Let cats be cats.


Let cats be cats1

Let cats be cats.


Cats not dogs a different metaphor for achieving critical thinking

Motivation toward a goal is influenced by the learners goal orientation. The value of the goal is affected by


Perceived needs

Perceived needs


Intrinsic qualities of goal

Intrinsic qualities of goal.


Utility of goal

Utility of goal.


Control and choice

Control and choice.


Influence of other

Influence of other.


Cats not dogs a different metaphor for achieving critical thinking

Motivation toward a goal is influenced by the learners goal orientation.The value of the goal is affected by Perceived needs Intrinsic qualities of goal Utility of goal Control and choice Influence of otherSvinicki, Learning and Motivation in the Postsecondary Classroom


The learner s expectation that the goal can be achieve is affected by

The learners expectation that the goal can be achieve is affected by


Difficulty of goal

Difficulty of goal


Prior experience with goal

Prior experience with goal


Match with learner skills

Match with learner skills


Encouragement example of others

Encouragement/example of others


Self efficacy with respect to this goal

Self-efficacy with respect to this goal


Attributions about success and failure

Attributions about success and failure


Beliefs attitudes about learning

Beliefs/attitudes about learning


Cats not dogs a different metaphor for achieving critical thinking

The learners expectation that the goal can be achieve is affected by Difficulty of goal Prior experience with goal Match with learner skills Encouragement/example of others Self-efficacy with respect to this goal Attributions about success and failure Beliefs/attitudes about learningSvinicki, Learning and Motivation in the Postsecondary Classroom


Iii critical thinking goals

III. Critical Thinking Goals

Cats are a mysterious kind of folk. There is more passing in their minds than we are aware of.

-Sir Walter Scott


Cats not dogs a different metaphor for achieving critical thinking

Cats are a mysterious kind of folk. There is more passing in their minds than we are aware of.

-Sir Walter Scott


Critical thinking is not just mimicry

Critical thinking is not just mimicry.


Defining critical thinking

Defining Critical Thinking

  • What do you mean by critical thinking in your discipline?

  • Which aspects of critical thinking are discipline-specific? Shared?


Iv strategies for achieving critical thinking

IV. Strategies for Achieving Critical Thinking


Cats not dogs a different metaphor for achieving critical thinking

By and large, people who enjoy teaching animals to roll over will find themselves happier with a dog.

-Barbara Holland


Strategies for enhancing feline intelligence

Strategies for EnhancingFeline Intelligence*

* Felinestein: Pampering the genius in your cat (Delzio & Ribarch)


1 social play

1. Social Play


1 social play1

1. Social Play


1 social play2

1. Social Play


1 social play3

1. Social Play

Engaging with others in collaborative activities

  • Group projects

  • Shared responsibility


2 object play

2. Object Play


2 object play1

2. Object Play


2 object play2

2. Object Play

Feline Haiku #2

Toy mice, dancing yarn,

Meowing sounds. Im convinced

Youre an idiot.


2 object play3

2. Object Play

Engaging with material through problem-solving activities

  • Labs

  • Field experiences


3 prey facsimiles

3. Prey Facsimiles


3 prey facsimiles1

3. Prey Facsimiles


3 prey facsimiles2

3. Prey Facsimiles


3 prey facsimiles3

3. Prey Facsimiles


3 prey facsimiles4

3. Prey Facsimiles

  • Simulations

  • Role play

  • Case studies


4 opportunities for learning when you re not there

4. Opportunities for learning when youre not there


4 opportunities for learning when you re not there1

4. Opportunities for learning when youre not there


4 opportunities for learning when you re not there2

4. Opportunities for learning when youre not there

Feline Haiku # 3

Seeking solitude,

I am locked in the closet.

For once I need you.


4 opportunities for learning when you re not there3

4. Opportunities for learning when youre not there

Structured out-of-class activities

  • Gibbs redefinition of course time

  • Walvoord & Johnsons first exposure


Strategies for enhancing feline intelligence1

Strategies for EnhancingFeline Intelligence*

  • Social Play

  • Object Play

  • Prey facsimiles

  • Creating opportunities for learning when youre not there

    * Felinestein: Pampering the genius in your cat (Delzio & Ribarch)


V cats for cats feedback and assessment

V. CATs for Cats:Feedback and Assessment

We know [cats] think, but only through indirect evidence.

-Bruce Fogel, DVM


V cats for cats feedback and assessment1

V. CATs for Cats:Feedback and Assessment

We know [cats] think, but only through indirect evidence.

-Bruce Fogel, DVM


Classroom assessment techniques

Classroom Assessment Techniques

Misconception/Preconception Check

This CAT is designed to uncover specific instances of incorrect or incomplete knowledge, attitudes, or values that represent likely barriers to new learning.


Classroom assessment techniques1

Classroom Assessment Techniques

Problem Recognition Tasks

Problem Recognition Tasks present students with a few examples of common problem types. The students task is to recognize and identify the particular type of problem each example represents.


Classroom assessment techniques2

Classroom Assessment Techniques

Application Cards

After students have heard or read about an important principle, generalization, or procedure, the instructor hands out an index card and asks them to write down at least one possible, real-world application for what they have just learned.


More ideas about feedback and assessment

More Ideas AboutFeedback and Assessment

How do you assess students critical thinking?

How do you know it when you see it?


How do they know

How do they know?


References

References

Angelo, T. A., & Cross, K. P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.

Delzio, S., & Ribarich, C. (1999). Felinestein: Pampering the genius in your cat. New York: HarperCollins.

Fisher, B., & Delzio, S. (1997). Caninestein: Unleashing the genius in your dog. New York: HarperCollins.

Fogle, B. (1992). The cats mind: Understanding your cats behavior. New York: Macmillan.


References1

References

Gibbs, G. (1999). Planning your students learning activities. Ch. 3, McKeachies teaching tips: Strategies, research, and theory for college and university teachers. McKeachie, W. J. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Lynch, C. L., & Wolcott, S. K. (2001). Helping your students develop critical thinking skills. IDEA Paper #37.

Orsi, R. (1998). Critical thinking: Whats it to ya? Topics of Conversation, 1.2.


References2

References

Pintrich, P. R., & Schunk, D. H. (1996). Motivation in education: Theory, research, and applications. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Svinicki, M. D. (2004). Learning and motivation in the postsecondary classroom. Bolton, MA: Anker.

Walvoord, B. E., & Anderson, V. J. (1998). Effective grading: A tool for learning and assessment. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.


Acknowledgements

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to our research assistants:

OdinTie-DyeElvira

GigiLicoriceSabrina

ZiggyBaileyToby

TexNosegayPunchy

RabbitChickenloafGracie

BenChessiePia

Evinrude Murphy Henry

PussStephenJason

And tohttp://today.iwon.com/pet.html & http://stuffonmycat.com


And finally

And finally


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