Urethritis
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URETHRITIS. By Gabie Gomez. ETIOLOGY. Urethritis is an inflammation of the urethra that is usually caused by an infection Uncomplicated urethritis usually results from infection by the bacteria Escherichia coli, commonly found in the bowel.

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Urethritis

URETHRITIS

By

Gabie Gomez


Etiology

ETIOLOGY

  • Urethritis is an inflammation of the urethra that is usually caused by an infection

  • Uncomplicated urethritis usually results from infection by the bacteria Escherichia coli, commonly found in the bowel.

  • Nongonorreal urethritis can be caused by monilial or trichomonal infections in woman.

  • Infection can cause cystitis in the bladder, or nephritis in the kidneys.

  • Females are at greater risk than men .


Clinical manisfestations

CLINICAL MANISFESTATIONS

  • Can include inflammation of the urethra with pus formation in the mucus forming glands within the lining of the urethra.

  • Purulent exudate from the meatus.


Signs symptoms

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

  • Painful or burning urination

  • Itchiness

  •   Pus or mucous coming out of your penis. (A stain might be noticeable on your underwear).

  • The opening at the end of your penis (meatus) may be stuck together by the dried secretions.

  • The opening at the end of your penis may appear red.

  • Urinating frequently

  • Pelvic pain during sexual intercourse

  • fever and chills,

  • Nausea or vomiting

  • lower back pain


Diagnostic test

DIAGNOSTIC TEST

  • A doctor can usually make a diagnosis of urethritis based on the symptoms alone

  • Palpating the abdomen for tenderness

  • Urinalysis

  • A swab inserted 1–4cm into the urethra and rotated once. The swab is smeared onto a glass slide and examined under the microscope


Medical management

MEDICAL MANAGEMENT

  • Typical treatment for urinary tract infections is a course of antibiotics.

    -Tetracycline (500 mg 4 times a day for seven days)

    -Ciprofloxacin (500 mg once a day)

    - Erythromycin (500 mg 4 times a day for seven days; preferred in pregnancy)

  • Drinking lots of fluids at the first sign of an infection

  • Adding a teaspoon of baking soda to a glass of water and drinking it can change the pH of the urine, causing it to burn less.

  • Drink cranberry juice which contains a compound that can prevent bacteria from sticking to and thus growing in the urinary tract.


Nursing interventions

NURSING INTERVENTIONS

  • Give the appropriate antibiotic

  • drink plenty of fluids

  • do not hold urine once the urge to urinate has occurred

  • after a bowel movement, wipe from front to rear to keep bowel bacteria at a distance

  • wear cotton underwear

  • rinse soap off well in the shower

  • urinate after sexual intercourse


Continued

CONTINUED…………

  • For post-menopausal women, estrogen replacement therapy can help prevent urinary tract infection

  • Sexually transmitted diseases that cause urethritis can be prevented by using a condom.

  • Avoid sexual intercourse during a UTI

  • Evaluate sexual partner

  • Vitamin C (250 to 500 mg twice a day) makes your urine more acidic, which keeps bacteria from growing.


Prognosis

Prognosis

  • Given the appropriate antibiotic, urinary tract infections usually go away quickly. If not treated soon enough, however, urethritis can move up the urinary tract, infecting the bladder and possibly the kidneys, resulting in kidney damage. If the infection moves into the blood, additional complications can arise. Those who have previously had a urinary tract infection are more susceptible to additional urinary tract infections.


The end

THE END


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