Curriculum standards and testing
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6. Curriculum, Standards, and Testing. EDUCATIONAL TIME LINE. 6.1. EDUCATIONAL TIME LINE (continued). 6.2. HIDDEN CURRICULUM?. 6.3. Student Generated Responses: What else did you learn in school?. GRADE LEVEL Elementary Middle High School. “HIDDEN” LESSONS.

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Curriculum, Standards, and Testing

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Curriculum standards and testing

6

Curriculum, Standards, and Testing


Educational time line

EDUCATIONAL TIME LINE

6.1


Educational time line continued

EDUCATIONAL TIME LINE (continued)

6.2


Hidden curriculum

HIDDEN CURRICULUM?

6.3

Student Generated Responses: What else did you learn in school?

  • GRADE LEVEL

  • Elementary

  • Middle

  • High School

  • “HIDDEN” LESSONS


The importance of extracurricular activities and academic subjects

Do you consider extracurricular activities as important as the academic subjects, or do you consider them as only a supplement to the academic subjects?

THE IMPORTANCE OF EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES AND ACADEMIC SUBJECTS

6.4

Source: Lowell C. Rose and Alec M. Gallup (2000), The 32nd Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup Poll of the Public’s Attitudes Toward the Public Schools, http://www.pdkintl.org/kappan/kpol0009.htm#1a


Shaping the curriculum

SHAPING THE CURRICULUM

6.5

Figure 6.1


Who and what shape the curriculum

WHO AND WHAT SHAPE THE CURRICULUM?

6.6

Student Generated Responses

  • WHO & WHAT

  • Students

  • Parental and community groups

  • Teachers

  • Administrators

  • Federal government

  • State government

  • Local government

  • Colleges and universities

  • Standardized tests

  • Education commissions andcommittees

  • Professional organizations

  • Special interest groups

  • EXAMPLES OF HOW


The digital divide on computer use

THE DIGITAL DIVIDE ON COMPUTER USE

6.7

Source: National Center for Education Statistics, Digest of Education Statistics, 2008 (Issued March 2009).

Figure 6.2


Textbook adoption states

TEXTBOOK ADOPTION STATES

6.8

Source: American Association of Publishers, Washington, DC, 2009.

Figure 6.3


Forms of bias

FORMS OF BIAS

6.9

  • BIAS

  • Invisibility

  • Stereotyping

  • Imbalance/selectivity

  • Unreality

  • Fragmentation/isolation

  • Linguistic bias

  • Cosmetic bias

  • EXAMPLES

Student Generated Responses


Three types of standards

THREE TYPES OF STANDARDS

6.10

  • Content standards

  • Performance standards

  • Opportunity-to-learn standards

Student Generated Responses


When students do poorly

WHEN STUDENTS DO POORLY

6.11

  • The schools failed to prepare students.

  • Something was wrong with the test design.

  • The students lack ability.

  • Don’t know.

    • How do we vote?

If students in your district did poorly on a standardized test, which might be your reaction?


No child left behind 2001

NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND (2001)

6.12

  • Annual testing

  • Adequate yearly progress (AYP)

  • Report cards

  • Highly qualified faculty

  • What other areas of the law are less well known?


Seven reasons why standardized tests are not working

SEVEN REASONS WHY STANDARDIZED TESTS ARE NOT WORKING

6.13

  • At-risk students placed at greater risk

  • Lower graduation rates

  • Higher test scores do not mean more learning

  • Standardized testing shrinks the curriculum

  • Test errors

  • Teacher stress

  • What’s worth knowing?


Teaching to the test

TEACHING TO THE TEST

6.14

Source: Education Week, Quality Counts, 2001.


Teacher stress

TEACHER STRESS

6.15

Source: A female teacher with a literature specialty teaching in a suburban elementary school. http://ganesh.ed.asu.edu/aims/view_image.php?image_id=72&grade_range_id=3

Figure 6.4


Do you believe in evolution

DO YOU BELIEVE IN EVOLUTION?

6.16

Source: “Trend Lines: Acceptance of Evolution,” The Washington Post, January 16, 2007.

Figure 6.5


Examples of censorship

EXAMPLES OF CENSORSHIP

6.17

  • Mary Rodgers’ Freaky Friday: “Makes fun of parents and parental responsibility.”

  • Plato’s Republic: “This book is un-Christian.”

  • Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days: “Very unfavorable to Mormons.”

  • William Shakespeare’s Macbeth: “Too violent for children.”

  • Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment: “Serves as a poor model for young people.”

  • Herman Melville’s Moby Dick: “Contains homosexuality.”

  • Anne Frank’s Diary of a Young Girl: “Obscene and blasphemous.”

  • E. B. White’s Charlotte’s Web: “Morbid picture of death.”

  • J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit: “Subversive elements.”

  • Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory: “Racist.”

  • Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: “Racism, insensitivity, and offensive language.”

  • Webster’s Dictionary: “Contains sexually explicit definitions.”

  • Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell’s And Tango Makes Three, for being anti-ethnic and anti-family, homosexuality, religious viewpoint, unsuited to the age group.

  • Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy for the political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, and violence.

  • Alvin Schwartz’s Scary Stories for occult/satanism, religious viewpoint, and violence.


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