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Short Writing and Deep Thinking. Richard Price UTB. UTMB Oct 10, 2013. Gula Nonsense. Crit Thinking Barnes/Bedau Cover. Barnes/Bedau Chklist. How Thnk Clearly Erlandson. CT Assessment. CrtTnk Resp Care Wood. Crt Thnk Resp Care Mishoe/Welch. Face0. Two Faced.

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Presentation Transcript

Richard Price

UTB

UTMB Oct 10, 2013














  • Course content leaves no

  • time for “extras.”


  • Course content leaves no

  • time for “extras.”

  • Subject matter instructors lack

  • confidence to teach writing.


Course content leaves no

time for “extras.”

Subject matter instructors lack

confidence to teach writing.

Grading is a time sink.


  • Writing mechanics

  • Rubric


  • Writing mechanics

  • Rubrics



  • Wrong words

  • Sentence boundaries

  • Agreement

  • Antecedents


  • Wrong words

  • Sentence boundaries

  • Agreement

  • Antecedents

  • s



  • Wrong words

  • Sentence boundaries

  • Agreement

  • Antecedents


Roman Greek history

Roman and Greek history, a two semester

sequence, perhaps the most populous course

on campus taken by almost all history majors

and many others, including some who thought

they would never take a history course.


  • Wrong words

  • Sentence boundaries

  • Agreement

  • Antecedents


One should always be alert for a teaching

moment because with a student you can

never tell when they will have a major

breakthrough.


  • Wrong words

  • Sentence boundaries

  • Agreement

  • Antecedents



  • Writing mechanics

  • Rubrics


  • Minmalist rubric: had badly hurt them both.

  • 60% for technical content

  • 40% for clarity



The smallest of the URF's (URFA6L), a 207-nucleotide (nt) reading

frame overlapping out of phase the NH2-terminal portion of the

adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) subunit 6 gene has been

identified as the animal equivalent of the recently discovered yeast

H+-ATPase subunit 8 gene. The functional significance of the other

URF's has been, on the contrary, elusive. Recently, however,

Immunoprecipitation experiments with antibodies to purified,

rotenone-sensitive NADH-ubiquinone oxido- reductase [hereafter

referred to as respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenase or complex I]

from bovine heart, as well a enzyme fractionation studies, have

indicated that six human URF's (that is, URF1, URF2, URF3, URF4,

URF4L, and URF5, hereafter referred to as ND1, ND2, ND3, ND4,

ND4L, and ND5) encode subunits of complex I. This is a large complex

that also contains many subunits synthesized in the cytoplasm.


  • In physics we learn that energy is conserved. Yet we are frequently reminded that we must conserve energy. In a single clear, coherent paragraph resolve this apparent paradox.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.


  • Words are used with precise meaning in science. The

  • word "energy," when used in a physics course, is an example: it means the total amount of all forms of energy, including electrical, chemical, heat energy and so forth. This total cannot be increased or decreased; the universe has a fixed amount of it. The word "energy," however, can have a different meaning when used in newspapers and by politicians; it means energy that is available to do useful work. As we drive our 8,000 lb SUV to school, we are converting the useful chemical energy of gasoline into useless hot exhaust and moving air. Nature conserves all of energy. We must conserve useful energy.



  • A student who receives high grades has gotten more from his or her college education than a student who receives low grades. Tuition therefore should be based on the grade point average. At the end of a semester students with low grades should receive a rebate.


  • Students must learn fairness as well as subject matter. I feel that the proposed system wouldn’t be right and just. It would not be a fair system. I have always felt that the grading system was fair and I am passionate about fairness. I would feel very bad about the proposed change.


  • Tuition is way too high. Students go to college to achieve a better life. Many of these students are poor. High tuition means that a student who is poor is destined to remain poor. College education is free in the more progressive countries of Western Europe; it should be free here also.


  • Grades are standardized measurements of varying levels of comprehension within a subject area. The GPA can be used by potential employers or further post-secondary institutions to assess and compare applicants. Tuition payments are charged by educational institutions to assist with funding of staff and faculty course offerings, lab equipment, computer systems, libraries, facility upkeep and to provide a comfortable student learning experience.


  • Tuition is not like payment for an appliance; it is a payment for services and resources provided to you. In this sense, college can be compared to a restaurant in which you are provided with services and a resource: the meal. The payment for the meal does not depend on how much you end up enjoying it. Payment based on outcome would not only be unfeasible, it would undermine both the restaurant and the college. To minimize expenses, diners would claim lack of enjoyment and students would strive for low, inexpensive grades.




Bad: reading Summarize chapters 5 through 12 of the Jones textbook.


Bad: reading Summarize chapters 5 through 12 of the Jones textbook.

Good: What was the single most important lesson in today's reading?

.


Bad: reading Summarize chapters 5 through 12 of the Jones textbook

Good: What was the single most important lesson in today's reading?

Bad: Review and contrast English common law and Napoleonic law.


Bad: reading Summarize chapters 5 through 12 of the Jones textbook

Good: What was the single most important lesson in today's reading?

Bad: Review and contrast English common law and Napoleonic law.

Good: Explain the different roles of “precedent” in English common law and the Napoleonic code.


ONE TWO THREE reading

One two three four five


TEST DAY STRATEGY reading

  • Choose the right seat.

  • Write down key facts.

  • Start with the big picture.

  • Directions count, so read them.

  • Mark up the questions.

  • Be precise when taking a machine-scored

  • test.

  • Work from easy to hard.

  • Watch the clock.

  • Take a strategic approach to questions you

  • cannot answer.

  • Use special techniques for math tests.


Bad reading: How should you prepare on test day? Explain in a single clearly written paragraph.


Bad reading: How should you prepare on test day? Explain in a single clearly written paragraph.

Good: You are taking a one hour exam. Half the credit is for 30 short answers, and half the credit is for an essay covering the same material. How should you organize your time? Answer in a single, clear paragraph giving your plan for organizing your time and the justification for that plan.


Numerous Mexican immigrants and descendants reading

live in the United States in pursuit of what they perceive

as a better life. Why do many of them cheer for the

Mexican soccer team when it plays the US team?"


Arguments can be made that a 0% tax reading

on capital gains rate unfairly benefits

the rich, while a 90% capital tax rate

discourages investment. What is the

ideal capital gains tax rate, and why

would it be bad to have it 5% higher or

lower?


A ball is dropped from the top of a tall building. As it falls it

passes three identical windows, a, b, and c, as shown in

the figure to the right. Behind each window is a trained ocelot

who carefully notes the speed of the ball at the top of his window,

and the greater speed at the bottom. The ocelot subtracts the

speed at the top from the speed at the bottom and comes up

with a number for the increase in speed by his window. Which

ocelot observes the greatest increase in speed, the one behind

window a, window b, or window c? Or do all ocelots observe

the same increase in speed? Ignore air resistance. Give your

answer and explain it in a single coherent well written paragraph

with no displayed material. Answers without explanations will

get no credit.



  • How to Make Up Good Prompts


  • How to Make Up Good Prompts


  • How to Make Up Good Prompts


  • View yourself in a struggle with the student. You want the falls it

  • student to think; the student doesn't want to.

  • Avoid any question that most students would answer the same

  • way.

  • Assign the writer a well defined role and task.

  • Avoid words like “review,” “summarize,” “list,” “include,”

  • “compare,”..

  • How to Make Up Good Prompts


  • View yourself in a struggle with the student. You want the falls it

  • student to think; the student doesn't want to.

  • Avoid any question that most students would answer the same

  • way.

  • Assign the writer a well defined role and task.

  • Avoid words like “review,” “summarize,” “list,” “include,”

  • “compare,”..

  • Focus on a detail. Ask yourself “What is the heart of the

  • matter here?” and find a concrete detail connected to that

  • heart of the matter.

  • How to Make Up Good Prompts


  • View yourself in a struggle with the student. You want the falls it

  • student to think; the student doesn't want to.

  • Avoid any question that most students would answer the same

  • way.

  • Assign the writer a well defined role and task.

  • Avoid words like “review,” “summarize,” “list,” “include,”

  • “compare,”..

  • Focus on a detail. Ask yourself “What is the heart of the

  • matter here?” and find a concrete detail connected to that

  • heart of the matter.

  • Remind the student to respond to the question.

  • How to Make Up Good Prompts


  • View yourself in a struggle with the student. You want the falls it

  • student to think; the student doesn't want to.

  • Avoid any question that most students would answer the same

  • way.

  • Assign the writer a well defined role and task.

  • Avoid words like “review,” “summarize,” “list,” “include,”

  • “compare,”..

  • Focus on a detail. Ask yourself “What is the heart of the

  • matter here?” and find a concrete detail connected to that

  • heart of the matter.

  • Remind the student to respond to the question.

  • Remind the student to avoid emotion-laden words personal

  • phrases

  • .

  • How to Make Up Good Prompts


  • View yourself in a struggle with the student. You want the falls it

  • student to think; the student doesn't want to.

  • Avoid any question that most students would answer the same

  • way.

  • Assign the writer a well defined role and task.

  • Avoid words like “review,” “summarize,” “list,” “include,”

  • “compare,”..

  • Focus on a detail. Ask yourself “What is the heart of the

  • matter here?” and find a concrete detail connected to that

  • heart of the matter.

  • Remind the student to respond to the question.

  • Remind the student to avoid emotion-laden words personal

  • phrases

  • Remind the student to write only a paragraph.

  • How to Make Up Good Prompts



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