Massachusetts Intel  Mathematics Initiative MIMI

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Speakers. Life LeGerosMA Department of Elementary and Secondary EducationRob RichardsonIntel MassachusettsCatherine RobertsMIMI InstructorDona AppleMath Learning Communities. Research Shows that Teacher Content Knowledge is Key. National Math Panel Report

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Massachusetts Intel Mathematics Initiative MIMI

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1. Massachusetts Intel Mathematics Initiative (MIMI) Strand 5: Strengthening STEM Fundamentals STEM Summit V: Implementing the Plan Sturbridge, MA October 28, 2008

2. Speakers Life LeGeros MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Rob Richardson Intel Massachusetts Catherine Roberts MIMI Instructor Dona Apple Math Learning Communities

3. Research Shows that Teacher Content Knowledge is Key National Math Panel Report – “Research on the relationship between teachers’ mathematical knowledge and students’ achievement confirms the importance of teachers’ content knowledge” (p. xxi) Effect size of mathematical knowledge for teaching on student performance equivalent to 2-3 extra weeks instruction or socioeconomic status (“Knowing Mathematics for Teaching” by Ball, Hill, and Bass, in Fall 2005 American Educator)

4. Math PD by the ESE Office of Math, Science, and Technology / Engineering Past efforts Professional Development Institutes (PDIs, formerly Content Institutes) Contracted by ESE, focused on urban districts; serve a variety of levels (from beginning teacher to coach) and foci (math foundations to special populations); 700-800 teachers per year (half math, half STE) Title IIB Math Science Partnership program (Federal grant) Partnerships of high-need districts, higher education institutions, and other organizations; typically 1000 teachers per year (half math, half STE) Future vision Teacher Academy Courses that provide professional progression offered around the state; linked to licensure; MIMI as the mathematical foundation

5. MIMI Overview MIMI in 2008 – 150 teachers 3 cohorts in Boston, 3 in Springfield, 1 in New Bedford, 1 in Worcester Similar numbers in 2007 Partner Responsibilities ESE – Recruit and pay instructors, select and support districts, supplement teacher stipends Intel – Develop and provide curriculum, train instructors, evaluation UMass Medical – Develop materials for Math Learning Community (MLC), train facilitators Districts – Recruit teachers, coordinate logistics (including site), pay stipends for coursework and MLC Intend to expand by leveraging grants and state funding, pursuing new grants

6. MIMI Benefits Compatibility with ESE goals Scalable foundational content course Experiential, models and addresses standards-based practices Corporate partner Intel brings important strengths to the partnership, such as curriculum development, experience with scaling, national scope, marketing, etc. Efficiency PDIs and Title IIB courses (45 hours + follow-up) = $1500 / teacher May include stipend or tuition MIMI (80 hours + MLC) = $1800 / teacher Includes $500 stipend per teacher

7. Why Does Intel Support this Program? We believe students everywhere deserve to have the tools needed to become the next generation of innovators. Intel invests $100m/yr. to help teachers teach, students learn and universities around the world innovate Research states best way to impact student achievement is via teacher content PD Vermont Math Initiative (via UVM) was well evaluated and has a track record of success. With input from expert ‘brain trusts’ and editing to make it scalable, Intel Math is born.

8. Instructor Training in CA

9. National Numbers 177 Teachers have completed the Year 1 Pilot (80 hours) 274 teachers competing the Year 2 Pilot (80 hours) 30 instructors trained in MA, NJ, CA 4 senior trainers Intel Math adopted in MA, NJ, CA (both SC and FM areas)

10. Evaluation by WestEd Statistically significant increase in teacher math content knowledge Statistically significant increase in teacher content knowledge for teaching Increased instructional time reported for algebra, non-routine problem solving, and mathematical communication

11. Year One (2007) Instructional Team

12. A bit from an instructor Catherine A. Roberts Professor of Mathematics College of the Holy Cross Worcester MA Ph.D. in 1992

13. Intel Math Logo

14. Course Basics 80 hour professional development course For elementary & middle school teachers Emphasis on deepening the conceptual understanding of mathematics 90% math content 10% math pedagogy Co-teaching model

15. Unit Topics Addition Subtraction Multiplication Division Fractions Rational Numbers Linear Relations Functions

16. Unit 2: Subtraction (details) Properties of the number systems Meaning of subtraction Adjective-Noun theme Alternate algorithms Processes and inverse processes Signed Numbers – addition & subtraction Pedagogy: Formative Assessment

17. Novel and deeper ways of thinking about the core material aims to strengthen the conceptual understanding of mathematics

18. Place Value via Base 5

19. Area Model for Multiplication

20. Learning with Manipulatives

21. (a+b) (c+d)

22. (a+b)(c+d)

23. How do we add?

24. adjective-noun theme

25. Why does a0 = 1?

26. Why is a positive number multiplied by a negative number always negative?

27. Mathematics Learning Community (MLC) Dona T. Apple, Research and Mathematics Staff Development, Senior Consultant [email protected] Wendy Pelletier Cleaves, Mathematics Coordinator [email protected] Sandra Mayrand, Director [email protected] Regional Science Resource Center University of Massachusetts Medical School

28. What is an MLC? Authentic discussions about how children learn mathematics Collegial discussions that deepen teachers’ knowledge of content and pedagogy Opportunity to revisit the mathematics of the IM Course Through metacognition and sw focus is on intuitive ways that children and adults approach problem solving. The content of the Intel course is presented again in the context of SW. This draws from both cognitive learning theory and adult learning theory. SW allows for the resolution of cognitive tension that is a natural part of the learning (or relearning or re-thinking) process. The learning environment shifts from a content/course setting with the teacher as learner to a collegial intellectual community. This shift allows for the focus to be on what is revealed in the student work. The teacher can not discuss content, misconceptions and the development of conceptual understanding revealed in the student work. This in turn allows for the cognitive tension to be resolved or for the process to begin through support systems that may be in place in the professional environment. SHARE CROSSWALK TEMPLATE AS HANDOUTThrough metacognition and sw focus is on intuitive ways that children and adults approach problem solving. The content of the Intel course is presented again in the context of SW. This draws from both cognitive learning theory and adult learning theory. SW allows for the resolution of cognitive tension that is a natural part of the learning (or relearning or re-thinking) process. The learning environment shifts from a content/course setting with the teacher as learner to a collegial intellectual community. This shift allows for the focus to be on what is revealed in the student work. The teacher can not discuss content, misconceptions and the development of conceptual understanding revealed in the student work. This in turn allows for the cognitive tension to be resolved or for the process to begin through support systems that may be in place in the professional environment. SHARE CROSSWALK TEMPLATE AS HANDOUT

29. Reasons for Examining Student Work Give students a grade Design or revise a task Redirect instruction Deepen understanding of how students think about mathematics Deepen personal understanding of mathematics The first three bullets are the reasons and experiences that most teachers have for LASW. MLC focuses on the last two….different level and focus in the conversations.The first three bullets are the reasons and experiences that most teachers have for LASW. MLC focuses on the last two….different level and focus in the conversations.

30. Goals of an MLC Form a collaborative learning community that focuses on student learning Understand new content in a deeper, more conceptual way Closely examine student work and formative assessments in order to determine progress and instructional needs Reflect on classroom practice, share strategies, discuss best practices, and expand professional expertise These goals have been discussed in the content of the previous slides. However, the Professional Development Guide is specific and has been developed through 5 plus years of learning (Cotent Course on Proportional Reasoning and from our work and observation of facilitation: Bibliography Provide anonymous student work with specific guiding questions that focus on evidence of understanding. Productive talk when schools have so little time. Provide resources for session extensions (already available) based on the needs of the group. Move sessions away gradually in allowing MLC participants to design questions for the SW template. Starting at session 7 participants can bring in their own student work However, we do provide SAW for sessions 7-10 if the group is not ready Session 11-13/bringing in your own student work. No SW is provided. Designing your own MLC from school or district data Bridging content, standards, and student understanding back to classroom practice---How do we respond when students are not learning? Expanding our own expertise by building schools as learning organizations that focus on what is best for kids. ALL KIDS!!!!! These goals have been discussed in the content of the previous slides. However, the Professional Development Guide is specific and has been developed through 5 plus years of learning (Cotent Course on Proportional Reasoning and from our work and observation of facilitation: Bibliography Provide anonymous student work with specific guiding questions that focus on evidence of understanding. Productive talk when schools have so little time. Provide resources for session extensions (already available) based on the needs of the group. Move sessions away gradually in allowing MLC participants to design questions for the SW template. Starting at session 7 participants can bring in their own student work However, we do provide SAW for sessions 7-10 if the group is not ready Session 11-13/bringing in your own student work. No SW is provided. Designing your own MLC from school or district data Bridging content, standards, and student understanding back to classroom practice---How do we respond when students are not learning? Expanding our own expertise by building schools as learning organizations that focus on what is best for kids. ALL KIDS!!!!!

31. MLC Session Format Mathematical background Metacognition Looking at student work Reflecting on learning Feedback and wrap up Perhaps we can give the participants a copy of Session 13 since it deals with Division of Fractions and I can spend a second on the Adjective noun theme being revisited in the Metacognition Question. How many 2/3’s in 3? Answer: 4 ½. (3’ds is the noun and 2 is the adjective. You have 2…thirds. the remainder is a 1/3 which is ½ of the whole (2 thirds) Focus on the LASW as the same protocol as all of the sessions. Found in Handout Reflecting on learning: Writing a problem at your grade span: go back to the standard addressed in grade span Reference reflective question stems: Perhaps we can give the participants a copy of Session 13 since it deals with Division of Fractions and I can spend a second on the Adjective noun theme being revisited in the Metacognition Question. How many 2/3’s in 3? Answer: 4 ½. (3’ds is the noun and 2 is the adjective. You have 2…thirds. the remainder is a 1/3 which is ½ of the whole (2 thirds) Focus on the LASW as the same protocol as all of the sessions. Found in Handout Reflecting on learning: Writing a problem at your grade span: go back to the standard addressed in grade span Reference reflective question stems:

32. Professional Learning: Purposeful and Transformative Believing in students and the intentions of their effort is an essential part of examining student work. No matter how flawed, student work provides a lens into mathematical thinking and understanding that might otherwise remain invisible. Addressing Belief systems and mental models as a way to transform: Work of Peter Senge (organizations that learn) Transformative Professional Learning that will help teachers to to develop useful ways to think about their practice and the development of students’ mathematical thinking. And to be able to articulate these new ways of thinking as part of a framework for transforming their classroom practice. Student work can help create new images of students capacity to learn rigorous mathematics and how those may or may not fit our images Reflect on practice Provide opportunity and access to all students Provide that same opportunity and access for learning in an intellectually stimulating environment for our teachers Making learning both additive----content course adds to the knowledge base. MLC goal is for professional learning to be transformative in that it transforms classroom practice. Addressing Belief systems and mental models as a way to transform: Work of Peter Senge (organizations that learn) Transformative Professional Learning that will help teachers to to develop useful ways to think about their practice and the development of students’ mathematical thinking. And to be able to articulate these new ways of thinking as part of a framework for transforming their classroom practice. Student work can help create new images of students capacity to learn rigorous mathematics and how those may or may not fit our images Reflect on practice Provide opportunity and access to all students Provide that same opportunity and access for learning in an intellectually stimulating environment for our teachers Making learning both additive----content course adds to the knowledge base. MLC goal is for professional learning to be transformative in that it transforms classroom practice.

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