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Healthy Lifestyles: AAFCS Leading by Example. Obesity Prevention Community of Practice and Taking it to the Street Campaign Ingrid K. Richards Adams, PhD RD LD. The Weight of the Nation. Weight of the Nation. The Obesity Epidemic. Most important public health problem.

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Healthy lifestyles aafcs leading by example

Healthy Lifestyles: AAFCS Leading by Example

Obesity Prevention Community of Practice and Taking it to the Street Campaign

Ingrid K. Richards Adams, PhD RD LD


The weight of the nation

The Weight of the Nation

  • Weight of the Nation


The obesity epidemic

The Obesity Epidemic

  • Most important public health problem

For the first time in human history, in the year 2000 it was estimated that there were more overweight than underweight people.

Source: Mendex, Monteiro, & Popkin 2005


A nation in crisis

A Nation in Crisis

  • Our nation stands at a crossroads

  • The present obesity epidemic threatens progress related to increasing American’s quality and years of healthy life

  • Result – a decreased ability to compete in the global economy.

    Source: Surgeon General’s Vision for a Fit and Healthy

    Nation 2010


The problem obesity

The Problem - Obesity

  • One-third of U.S. adults (33.8%) are obese – 17 million

    • Approximately 6% with a BMI over 40kg/m2

The prevalence of obesity among adults changed relatively little during the 1960s and 1970s, but it increased sharply over the ensuing decades – from 13.4% in 1980 to 34.4% in 2008.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Sizing up the obesity challenge

Sizing up the Obesity Challenge

  • One in every three children (31.7%) ages two to 19 is overweight or obese.

  • One-third of all children born in the year 2000 are expected to develop diabetes during their lifetime.


Sizing up the obesity challenge1

Sizing up the Obesity Challenge

  • The current generation may even be on track to have a shorter lifespan than their parents

Source: White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity, 2010


Obesity more common among certain racial and ethnic groups

Obesity more Common Among Certain Racial and Ethnic Groups

  • Obesity rates are highest among non-Hispanic black girls and Hispanic boys.

  • Obesity is particularly common among American Indian/Native Alaskan children

Source:


Military readiness

Military Readiness

  • More than a third of all Americans ages 17-24 are unqualified for military service because they are too heavy.

  • The Army has started to overhaul food choices on bases.

Source: White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity, 2010


Firefighters

Firefighters

  • Half of incoming and current firefighters are overweight, while almost one-third are obese.

  • More firefighters die of heart attacks while on the job than from any other cause.

Source: White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity, 2010


Police officers

Police Officers

  • Potential recruits are overweight, and many have trouble passing the initial police academy fitness requirement.

Source: White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity, 2010


The obesity epidemic1

The Obesity Epidemic

  • It came quickly, with little fanfare, and was out of control before the nation noticed.

    Source: Brownell & Horgen, 2004- Food Fight


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1985

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1985

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1986

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1986

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1987

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1987

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1988

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1988

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1989

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1989

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1990

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1991

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1991

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1992

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1992

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1993

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1993

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1994

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1994

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1995

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1995

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1996

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1996

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1997

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1997

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1998

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1998

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 1999

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1999

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2000

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2000

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2001

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2001

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Healthy lifestyles aafcs leading by example

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2002

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2003

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2003

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2004

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2004

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2005

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2005

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29 % ≥30%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2006

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2006

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2007

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2007

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2008

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2008

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2009

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2009

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%


Obesity trends among u s adults brfss 2010

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2010

(*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person)

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%


Healthy lifestyles aafcs leading by example

Obesity Trends* Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS,1990, 2000, 2010

(*BMI 30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 5’4” person)

2000

1990

2010

No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30%


Prevalence of self reported obesity among u s adults brfss 2011

Prevalence* of Self-Reported Obesity Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 2011

*Prevalence reflects BRFSS methodological changes in 2011, and these estimates should not be compared to previous years.

15%–<20% 20%–<25% 25%–<30% 30%–<35% ≥35%


Adult obesity rates and trends 2008 2010

Adult Obesity Rates and Trends2008- 2010

  • Ten years ago, no state had an obesity rate above 24 percent, now 43 states have higher obesity rates than the state that was the highest in 2000.

  • Adult obesity rates rose in 16 states over the past year. No state decreased.

  • Twelve states now have obesity rates above 30 percent: Alabama, Arkansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri,

    Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia.

  • Four years ago, only one state was above 30 percent.

    Source: F as in Fat 2011


Current daily expenditure for obesity related diseases in the usa

Current DAILY expenditure for obesity related diseases in the USA

>$275,000,000 (CDC estimate)


Obesity projections

Obesity projections

  • Keeping Obesity Rates Level Could Save Nearly $550 Billion Over 2 Decades!

  • Obesity to Rise: 65 Million More Obese Adults in the US and 11 Million More in the UK Expected by 2030!

  • Study Suggests 86 Percent Of Americans Could Be Overweight Or Obese By 2030!

    Source: Science Daily


The economics and ecology of food

Unhealthy Environment

The Economics and Ecology of Food

Healthy Choices

Eating to balance energy expenditure

Food Availability

Abundance

Snacking

Convenience Stores

Vending Machines

Processed Foods

Cooking Less

Eating Out More

Large Portions

Fast Food Choices

Value Meals

Food Courts

All You Can Eat Buffets


The economics and ecology of food1

Unhealthy Environment

The Economics and Ecology of Food

Healthy Choices

Burning calories to balance intake

Elevators

Escalators

Telephones

Snow Blowers

Remote Control

Cars, Buses, Trains

Computers

E-mail

Drive-Thru Society

Television

Cable Channels

Video Games

VCR’s Home Movies


The economics and ecology of food2

Unhealthy Environment

The Economics and Ecology of Food

Healthy Choices

Making time for health

Living the Hurried Life

Always Rushing

Overscheduled

Overdoing it

Not Living in the Moment

Working Longer Time

Less Leisure Time

Family Stresses

Juggling Schedules

Juggling Roles

No Time for Family

No Time for Self


We can make a difference

We can Make a Difference

  • AAFCS has addressed challenging social and economic issues for over 100years


What can we do

What can we do?

The Obesity Awareness Community and Taking it to the Streets Campaign is calling on all FCS professionals to:

  • Take part in the recommended level of physical activity each day—at least 30 minutes


Healthy lifestyles aafcs leading by example

Thirty minutes of any type of moderate physical activity


What can we do1

What can we do?

Choose healthy foods each day based on the 2012 Dietary Guidelines

  • 2


How can our impact be felt

How can our Impact be felt?

  • Thirty or more minutes of physical activity can save $500 in healthcare cost per year.

  • If 50 members in each affiliate take part in the recommended physical activity = $25,000 of savings per affiliate each year

  • If each affiliate gets 50 members involve = $1,250,000 of healthcare savings


8 week obesity awareness campaign

8 Week Obesity Awareness campaign

  • Begin January 5, 2013 (to coincide with New Year’s resolutions)

  • Finish on March 5, 2013

  • Forms for documenting activity and healthy eating practices will be sent to each Affiliate President

  • Each Affiliate will have a Community of Practice member contact


We need your 500 to make a difference

We need your $500 to make a difference!


Healthy lifestyles aafcs leading by example

When?


Healthy lifestyles aafcs leading by example1

Healthy Lifestyles: AAFCS Leading by Example

Graphics: Microsoft Online, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Author: Ingrid Adams, Ph.D., R.D. L.D.

Chair: AAFCS Obesity Prevention Community of Practice

Assistant Professor , Nutrition and Food Science, University of Kentucky

Extension Specialist for Nutrition and Weight Management

October 2012

Policy

The Cooperative Extension Service is federally mandated to take affirmative steps to ensure that its programs and services are available to all people. One step is public notification of its intention to serve all audiences.

All Extension materials intended for public distribution must include the following statement:

Educational programs of Kentucky Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability, or national origin.

Letterhead, enclosure slips, and newsletters must also include the following "cooperating" statement:

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, KENTUCKY STATE UNIVERSITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, AND KENTUCKY COUNTIES, COOPERATING


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