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Roadside Nature Reserves in Kent Head Office: Kent Wildlife Trust, Tyland Barn, Sandling, Maidstone, Kent ME14 3BD Tel: 01622 662012 Fax: 01622 671390 www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk info@kentwildlife.org.uk

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Roadside Nature Reserves in Kent

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Roadside Nature Reserves in Kent

Head Office: Kent Wildlife Trust, Tyland Barn, Sandling, Maidstone, Kent ME14 3BD

Tel: 01622 662012 Fax: 01622 671390 www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk info@kentwildlife.org.uk

Registered Charity No. 239992. A company limited by guarantee No. 633098. VAT Registration No. 204799154

Protecting Wildlife for the Future

Protecting Wildlife for the Future


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There are 134 RNRs in Kent.

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What are Roadside Nature Reserves?

  • Kent’s RNRs protect about 90 kms of important roadside habitat.

  • This includes threatened habitats such as ancient woodland, chalk grassland and heathland.

  • Some RNRs hold locally or nationally rare species such as Lizard orchid on a verge in Thanet and Saw-wort on a verge in Tunbridge Wells.

Protecting Wildlife for the Future


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Road Verge Management

  • Each RNR is marked by signs on posts.

  • Each site has a prepared management plan to suit the species for the site.

  • In most cases one or two cuts are prescribed avoiding the summer months.

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Road Verge Management

  • Some management is undertaken during the winter months, by the Project Officer with the help of volunteers

  • The work involves cutting back scrub, brush cutting and raking grass

  • Creating habitat and log piles

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The role of the Volunteer Warden

  • There are over 65 volunteers helping with the Road Verge Project

  • They report back on time of cuts and general condition of the site

  • Carry out occasional litter picking

  • Report back on problems such as, fly tipping, overriding or missing RNR signs/posts

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The role of Volunteer Wardens

  • Help with monitoring during the summer months

  • Counting key species e.g. orchids

  • Recording other flora and fauna

  • Some volunteers help with management tasks over the winter, such as, scrub clearance, brushcutting and raking

Protecting Wildlife for the Future


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  • RNR adjacent to the A229

  • Ox-eye daisy

  • Common bird’s-foot-trefoil

  • Pyramidal orchid

  • Each year this verge takes three – five days to cut and clear. This work is undertaken by the Project Officer and volunteers

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Wildlife on RNRs

  • The RNRs help protect 16 or more different species of orchid.

  • RNRs (and general road verges) provide vital wildlife corridors for many species, particularly mammals such as badgers and dormice.

  • Species-rich grassland attract many insects, including butterflies.

  • Reptiles can be found on un-disturbed road verges.

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Financial

Re-organisation at Kent Highways

Incorrect management

Safety issues for some sites

Lack of manpower

Constraints

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Benefits

  • Wildlife corridors

  • Improve aesthetics of road verges

  • Raise Public awareness

  • Engage the local community

  • Vital reservoirs for rare species

  • Connections in the Living Landscape

Protecting Wildlife for the Future


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Lydden seed harvesting project

Protecting Wildlife for the Future


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Distributing the seed along arable margin

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Lydden Complex

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  • Organisations involved with

  • the RNR Project

  • Countryside Management Projects

  • District Councils

  • DEFRA- Rural Development Service

  • Parish Councils

  • RLCI

  • Local communities

  • Groundwork

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  • Funding for Site Projects:

  • RLCI

  • MVCP

  • DEFRA

  • Unison

  • Rees Jeffrey Road Fund

  • KCC

  • Potted garden nursery

  • Lydden Parish Council

  • Countdown 2010

  • KCC local scheme grants

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Photographs by Fred Booth, Anne Waite, Andy Vidler, Vernon Hucks, Bryony Chapman, John McAllister, Judith Shorter, John Kemp, Dan Atwood, Richard Moyse, Dave Watson, Tony Connor and Gill Tysoe.

Protecting Wildlife for the Future


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