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SEMICON West 2006 STEP Methods to Measure/Improve Equipment Productivity. SEMI Equipment Performance Standards Integration. Sal DiIorio Semi-Tech Group [email protected] Equipment Performance Metrics Process. Factory sources (automated and/or human) provide the inputs

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SEMICON West 2006 STEP Methods to Measure/Improve Equipment Productivity

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Semicon west 2006 step methods to measure improve equipment productivity l.jpg

SEMICON West 2006 STEPMethods to Measure/Improve Equipment Productivity

SEMI Equipment Performance Standards Integration

Sal DiIorioSemi-Tech Group

[email protected]


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Equipment Performance Metrics Process

  • Factory sources (automated and/or human) provide the inputs

  • Standards define the process and equations

  • Metrics are output consistently

    • Same meaning for all metrics regardless of location

Metrics

Factory Data

SEMI

Standard

SemiCon West 2006


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Factory Data Sources

  • Automated Systems

    • Production data, state history

    • Equipment Maintenance and state history

    • Equipment Cell Controllers

    • Equipment E116 or E58 state information

  • Non-automated Systems

    • Manual state change histories

    • Manual input to support E58

    • Other state and history logs

SemiCon West 2006


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Eq. Performance Standards Relationship

SemiCon West 2006


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E10 RAM

  • Central to all Equipment Metrics Standards

  • First developed in 1986 and continuously improved to meet new requirements of the semiconductor industry

  • Defines the basic equipment states and metrics which act as input to other performance metrics

    • E79 Overall Equipment Efficiency

    • E35 Cost of Ownership

    • E124 Factory Level Productivity

SemiCon West 2006


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E10 Process

SemiCon West 2006


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E116 Process

SemiCon West 2006


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Mapping the States

NON-SCHEDULED (MES) AND ANY STATE* (EPT)

MANUFACTURING (MES) AND BLOCKED (EPT)

ENGINEERING (MES) AND BLOCKED (EPT)

UNSCHEDULED DOWN (MES) AND ANY STATE* (EPT)

SCHEDULED DOWN (MES) AND ANY STATE* (EPT)

ENGINEERING (MES) AND BUSY (EPT)

ENGINEERING (MES) AND IDLE (EPT)

MANUFACTURING (MES) AND IDLE (EPT)

MANUFACTURING (MES) AND BUSY (EPT)

E10 States

NON-SCHEDULED

TIME

UNSCHEDULED

DOWNTIME

SCHEDULED

DOWNTIME

ENGINEERING

TIME

STANDBY

TIME

PRODUCTIVE

TIME

*ANY STATE (EPT) means that the EPT state is not a factor in determining the E10 state.

SemiCon West 2006


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E58 Process

SemiCon West 2006


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E58 vs. E10 State Examples

  • Equipment tracks its own E58 state...

  • But… it doesn’t know its own E10 state details

  • User input is required, in order to provide accurate data

SemiCon West 2006


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E58 – How it works

Information exchange regarding equipment downtime state and material type.

MES

Operator input to trigger

E58 state changes.

E58 state transition

Event reports.

Equipment

Host

Computer

Host input to trigger

E58 state changes.

Metrics

SemiCon West 2006


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Now that we have E10 Metrics, what do we do with them?

  • Continuous

  • Improvement

  • Activities

  • Lean Mfg

  • TPM

  • RCM

  • 6 Sigma

  • Rel Eng

  • Etc.

SemiCon West 2006


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Using E10 Metrics

  • Use them in purchase acceptance specifications

    • MTBFp, Uptime, MTTR, etc.

  • Monitor our own performance and drive continuous improvement activities

    • Look for improvements in metrics when new procedures or processes are implemented.

  • Benchmarking functions with other companies or between factories

  • Use them as inputs to other SEMI Standards for a better understanding of equipment COO or productivity

SemiCon West 2006


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SEMI E35 COO

  • COO = The full cost of embedding, operating, and decommissioning in a factory environment equipment needed to accommodate the required volume of production units.

  • Among the many inputs used by E35, two come from E10

    • Operational Uptime

    • E10 metrics (MTBF, MTTR) to calculate maintenance labor hours required for scheduled and unscheduled downtime

SemiCon West 2006


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E79 OEE

  • OEE calculations are stated in terms that are consistent with SEMI E10.

    OEE = Availability Efficiency x Operational Efficiency

    x Rate Efficiency x Quality Efficiency

    Where E10 directly provides the values for:

  • Availability Efficiency = Equipment Uptime/ Total Time

  • Operational Efficiency = Production Time/ Equipment Uptime

  • Rate Efficiency = Theoretical Production Time for Actual Units

    / Production Time

  • Quality Efficiency = Theoretical Production Time for Effective Units / Theoretical Production Time for Actual Units

    Notes:

    Production Time is not defined in E10, but happens in Productive Time.

    Rate Efficiency x Operational Efficiency = Performance Efficiency

SemiCon West 2006


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The Relationship Between OEE and E10

SemiCon West 2006


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E79 Process

In addition to OEE several other efficiencies are also defined to enable users to assess more specific aspects of equipment productivity.

Other data can come from MES or other Factory sources.

SemiCon West 2006


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What is needed to determine E10 State?

SemiCon West 2006


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What is needed to calculate E10 Metrics?

SemiCon West 2006


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What data do people capture worst?

Transition from STANDBY to PRODUCTIVE

Transition from PRODUCTIVE to STANDBY

Transition to UNSCHEDULED DOWNTIME

Wafer/Cycle Counts

Failures

Cluster Tool Module level states

What data do people capture best?

Transition to and from SCHEDULED DOWNTIME

NON-SCHEDULED time

Reason for Failures

Equipment dependent vs. non-equipment dependent

Transition and reasons for Maintenance Delay

Automation vs. Manual Data Collection

SemiCon West 2006


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What data does automation capture worst?

Transition to and from SCHEDULED DOWNTIME

NON-SCHEDULED time

Reason for Failures

Equipment dependent vs. non-equipment dependent

Transition and reasons for Maintenance Delay

What data does automation capture best?

Transition from STANDBY to PRODUCTIVE

Transition from PRODUCTIVE to STANDBY

Transition to UNSCHEDULED DOWNTIME

Wafer/Cycle Counts

Failures

Cluster Tool Module level states

Automation vs. Manual Data Collection

SemiCon West 2006


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Is automation absolutely necessary?

  • Automation is superior for the following:

    • Accurate data regarding Productive / Standby time

      • More accurate OEE Operational Efficiency values

    • Accurate data about cluster tool module level state

      • Essential for CT RAM and CT OEE metrics

    • Accurate quantitative data about units processed and other parametric data for scheduling maintenance.

  • Some level of automation is absolutely preferable, even if limited.

SemiCon West 2006


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Do we really need automation?

  • Yes, primarily if:

    • Detailed information is absolutely required.

      • CT RAM and OEE metrics

    • The cost of implementing and supporting automation can be justified.

      • Full automation requires large investments in HW, SW and IT and is never “done”; it continually needs updates and ongoing commitment of resources (people and $$$).

  • Lesser degrees of automation can provide significant improvements in data accuracy.

    • MES and CMMS (CIM) systems provide excellent sources for E10 data.

SemiCon West 2006


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What if full automation is not possible?

  • Equipment level E10 metrics can be maintained.

    • Daily and Weekly summaries can be analyzed.

    • Look for changes and trends

      • Equipment to equipment

      • Time period to time period

  • Simple OEE metric may be possible.

    • Even if detailed rate and quality data are not available

  • COO calculations are still meaningful.

SemiCon West 2006


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Conclusions

  • SEMI equipment performance metrics standards work together to provide meaningful information about the RAM, utilization, productivity, and COO of semiconductor equipment.

  • While high levels of automation are required for the most accurate data and many detailed metrics, manual data can still provide useful information.

    • For newer, multi-billion dollar factories the return provided by small increases in productivity may quickly exceed the cost of automation.

    • Older, smaller factories can achieve meaningful results with less automation, as long as absolute accuracy is not needed.

SemiCon West 2006


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