Managing Long-Lived COTS Based Systems - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Managing long lived cots based systems
Download
1 / 24

National Research Council Canada Institute for Information Technology. Conseil national de recherches Canada Institut de technologie de l’information. Managing Long-Lived COTS Based Systems. Dr. M.R.Vigder J. C. Dean Software Engineering Group Institute for Information Technology.

I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.

Download Presentation

Managing Long-Lived COTS Based Systems

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Managing long lived cots based systems

National Research Council

Canada

Institute for

Information Technology

Conseil national de recherches

Canada

Institut de technologie

de l’information

Managing Long-Lived COTS Based Systems

Dr. M.R.Vigder

J. C. Dean

Software Engineering Group

Institute for Information Technology


Outline

Outline

  • About NRC/IIT/SEG

  • Setting a baseline

  • System management activities

  • Management activities support

  • Where this fits in the life cycle

  • Conclusions

©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


National research council of canada

National Research Council of Canada

  • principal science and technology agency of the Canadian federal government

  • http://www.nrc.ca

    • 16 research institutes

      • Institute for Information Technology (IIT)

        • Undertakes focused, industry-oriented research in software and systems

        • 5 groups (including Software Engineering)

  • ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Software engineering group main objectives

    Software Engineering Group Main objectives

    • To help the Canadian software industry be more effective

      • Deliver software on time, within budget

      • Deliver quality software

    • To advance and disseminate software engineering knowledge

      • Via research

      • Via industry collaboration

      • Via education

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Software engineering group interests

    Software Engineering Group Interests

    • Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software

    • Real-time and embedded systems

    • Configuration management

    • Human Factors in software engineering

    • Consortium for Software Engineering Research (CSER)

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Cots project

    COTS Project

    • Vision

      • Explore issues associated with using COTS software components to build long-lived systems

      • Taken from the perspective of a system integrator

    • Goals

      • Provide guidance to developers

        • Robust, maintainable systems

    • Client

      • Department of National Defence - Canada

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    What is a cots component

    What Is A COTS Component?

    • A software component that has been obtained from a third-party and that the developer uses on an as-is basis

      • User of the COTS component does not modify the source in any way

      • COTS developer is responsible for maintenance and evolution of the COTS component

      • Identical copies of the COTS component are being used by different developers

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Viewpoints to consider

    Viewpoints To Consider

    • Component supplier

      • Build components that are open

    • System integrator

      • Components pre-exist

      • Components are supplied by a third party

      • Attempt to satisfy customer by configuring, tailoring, integrating and supplementing components

    • Customer

      • Acquire systems that are robust and adaptable

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Cots systems development

    COTS Systems Development

    • Challenges

      • Source code is not available

      • Variable maintenance and release schedules

      • Software components provide too little, or too much, functionality

      • Limited influence on development directions

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Cots system management

    COTS System Management

    • Activities

      • Component life cycle management

      • Customization

      • Behavioural Analysis

    • Support

      • Architectures

      • Instrumentation

      • Configuration management

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Management activities

    Management Activities

    • Component life cycle management

      • Evaluation of new or updated components

      • Test, and possibly rewrite “glue” and “wrappers”

      • Integration testing

      • Installation, deployment, moving and removing components

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Management activities1

    Management Activities

    • Customization

      • Types

        • Using plug-ins to add functionality

        • Configuration or preference files

        • Scripting

        • Combining services

        • Wrapping components

        • Standard templates or macros

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Management activities2

    Management Activities

    • Customization

      • Responsibilities

        • Selecting customizations for CM

        • Verifying CM processes are followed

        • Implementing a process for defining, implementing and testing the customization

        • Deploying the customizations

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Management activities3

    Management Activities

    • Behavioural analysis

      • Maintain and improve the capability of a system

        • Reconfigure system resources to improve performance

      • Troubleshooting

      • Identify and isolate the cause of failures

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Support for management activities

    Support for Management Activities

    • Component life cycle

      • Architectural support

        • Framework for management of disjoint components

      • Configuration Management

        • Entire modules are tracked by version

      • Instrumentation

        • Status of the components

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Support for management activities1

    Support for Management Activities

    • Customization

      • Architectural support

        • Business processes encapsulated within mediators

      • Configuration Management

        • Maintain as source code and as components

      • Instrumentation

        • Built into the customization code

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Support for management activities2

    Support for Management Activities

    • Behavioural analysis

      • Architectural support

        • Detect, isolate and log component faults

      • Configuration Management

        • Track version incompatibilities

      • Instrumentation

        • Determine which component, or set of components, is at fault

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Architecture concepts

    Component

    Component

    Component

    Component

    Component

    Component

    Component

    Manager

    Architecture Concepts

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Life cycle implications

    Life Cycle Implications

    • Software maintenance

      • New goals

        • Upgrade driven

        • Not user requirements driven

      • Earlier concerns

        • Maintaining components during system development

        • Blurring the lines

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Life cycle implications1

    Life Cycle Implications

    • Software management

      • Coordination concerns

        • Multiple product upgrade paths

        • Possible approaches

      • Incremental development

        • Consider upgrades as part of next increment

        • Individual upgrades

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Conclusions

    Conclusions

    • System management key activities

      • Component life cycle management

      • Customization

      • Behavioural analysis

    • Support

      • Architectural choices

      • Instrumentation techniques

      • Configuration management practices

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Conclusions1

    Conclusions

    • System vs. software management

      • Difficult to separate responsibilities

      • Not a “new” concept

    • COTS Software-based Systems

      • Changed management focus

      • Liaison function more important

      • Life-cycle phases overlap

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Comments

    Comments

    • From this morning

      • Systems can be defined at different levels

        • Standard must support this

      • Commercial life cycle

        • Short scale/incremental development cycle needed

      • Warranty/escrow requirements are overblown

        • Can’t depend on warranties

        • Can’t keep up engineering cognizance

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


    Information

    Information

    • Mark.Vigder@nrc.ca

    • John.Dean @nrc.ca

    • http://wwwsel.iit.nrc.ca

    ©1998 M. Vigder/J.C. Dean


  • Login