Introduction to the language arts
Download
1 / 26

INTRODUCTION TO THE LANGUAGE ARTS - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 711 Views
  • Updated On :

CHAPTER 1. INTRODUCTION TO THE LANGUAGE ARTS. ACTIVITIES TAKING PLACE. Reading. Writing. Visual representing. Listening. MEANING. Speaking. Viewing. THROUGHOUT THE DAY. Integrated Language Arts Wheel. The Standards for the English Language Arts.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'INTRODUCTION TO THE LANGUAGE ARTS' - bernad


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Introduction to the language arts l.jpg

CHAPTER1

INTRODUCTION TO THE LANGUAGE ARTS


Integrated language arts wheel l.jpg

ACTIVITIES TAKING PLACE

Reading

Writing

Visual representing

Listening

MEANING

Speaking

Viewing

THROUGHOUT THE DAY

Integrated Language Arts Wheel


The standards for the english language arts l.jpg
The Standards for the English Language Arts

  • Read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to

    • understand texts themselves

    • understand U.S. cultures

    • acquire new information

    • respond to society and the workplace

    • seek personal fulfillment


The standards for the english language arts continued l.jpg
The Standards for the English Language Arts (continued)

2. Read a range of literature from many periods and genres to understand dimensions of human experience

• Philosophical

• Ethical

• Aesthetic


Slide5 l.jpg

The Standards for the

English Language Arts (continued)

  • Apply range of strategies to comprehend,

  • interpret, evaluate, & appreciate texts

  • • prior experience

  • • interactions with other readers and writers

  • • knowledge of word and text meaning

  • • word identification


The standards for the english language arts continued6 l.jpg
The Standards for the English Language Arts (continued)

  • Adjust use of language to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes

  • Employ a range of writing strategies and use writing process elements to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes

  • Apply knowledge to create, critique, and discuss texts

    •language structure

    • language conventions (e.g., spelling & punctuation)

    • media techniques

    • figurative language

    • genre


The standards for the english language arts continued7 l.jpg
The Standards for the English Language Arts (continued)

7. Conduct research on issues and interests

•generate ideas and questions

•pose problems

• gather, evaluate, synthesize data

• communicate discoveries


The standards for the english language arts continued8 l.jpg
The Standards for the English Language Arts (continued)

8. Use a variety of technological and information resources

9. Develop an understanding of and respect for diversity in language use, patterns, and dialects

10. ELL/ESL use first language to develop competency in English language arts and content areas

11. Participate in a variety of literacy communities


The standards for the english language arts continued9 l.jpg
The Standards for the English Language Arts (continued)

12. Use language to accomplish the reader’s own purposes

  • learning

  • enjoyment

  • persuasion

  • information exchange


Slide10 l.jpg

  • South Carolina Frameworks

  • Language Arts Standards currently under revision.

  • Draft of New Standards available on SC Department of Education Website:

    • http://www. myscschools.com



Slide12 l.jpg

Cambourne’s Conditions Necessary for Learning

Expectation

Demonstration

Response

Immersion

ENGAGEMENT

Employment

Approximation

Responsibility


Characteristics of a successful learning activity cambourne 2001 l.jpg
Characteristics of a SuccessfulLearning Activity(Cambourne, 2001)

  • Has links to other parts of learning

  • Is accompanied by reasons why students should participate

  • Encourages interaction and collaboration

  • Encourages integration of more than one language mode


Characteristics of a successful learning activity cambourne 2001 cont l.jpg
Characteristics of a SuccessfulLearning Activity(Cambourne, 2001)(cont.)

  • Encourages the use of more than language subsystems

  • Encourages integration of meaning across different semiotic systems

  • Involves higher-level thinking

  • Is developmentally appropriate and does not demand a lot of time or expense


Ideologies on teaching the language arts l.jpg
Ideologies on Teaching the Language Arts

  • Functional literacy ideology

    • Focuses on learning to read and write instead of reading and writing to learn

  • Progressive literacy ideology

    • Focuses on a student-centered curriculum based on students’ needs and personal backgrounds


Approaches to teaching the language arts l.jpg
Approaches to Teaching the Language Arts

  • Separate skills approach

  • Whole language approach

  • Integrated approach

  • Balanced approach


Separate skills approach charts l.jpg

Viewing

Visual Representing

Listening

Speaking

Speaking

Listening

Spelling

Writing

Reading

Capitalization

Reading

Handwriting

VisualRepresenting

Viewing

Punctuation

Writing Subskills

Separate Skills Approach Charts


The whole language pie l.jpg

Listening

Speaking

Reading

A slice of “pie” includes all language arts elements

EXPERIENCES & CONTENT AREAS (Math, Science, Social Studies)

Writing

Viewing

Visually Representing

The Whole Language “Pie”


Slide19 l.jpg

The Integrated Approach

(the six components of the language arts are

woven into the study of all subject areas)


Slide20 l.jpg

Separate Skills

Whole Language

Direct Instruction

Indirect Instruction

Balanced Approach

to the Language Arts



Differentiating instruction thomlinson 2000 l.jpg
Differentiating Instruction (Thomlinson, 2000)

Differentiating instruction involves belief that students . . .

  • of the same age differ in readiness to learn

  • have different abilities

  • have different interests

  • have different learning styles

  • have different background experiences


Differentiating instruction cont l.jpg
Differentiating Instruction (cont.)

Differentiating instruction involves belief that students . . .

  • learn at different paces

  • learn best in a community of learners

  • learn best when they can connect school learning to personal lives

  • need accommodations in order to reach their potential


National reading panel nrp l.jpg
National Reading Panel (NRP)

  • Charged with reviewing and assessing research on teaching reading

  • Released report backed by U.S. Congress that asserted students need explicit, systematic phonics instruction

  • Reading First Legislation of 2002 (No Child Left Behind” act—PL 107-110) based on the panel’s findings


No child left behind act l.jpg
“No Child Left Behind” Act

  • To qualify for Title I monies, schools must

    • use “scientific evidence-based” educational plans

    • document student growth in six areas: (1) phonemic awareness, (2) systematic phonics, (3) spelling and writing, (4) fluency, (5) text comprehension, and (6) vocabulary

  • Mandates standardized testing at all grades (high stakes testing)


Most important things mits l.jpg
Most Important Things (MITs)

  • Based on this information and your readings in the textbook, use one of the cards to answer the following questions:

    • What are the three MITs from today’s information?

    • What questions do you still have?

    • What one task do you need to complete before the next class?


ad