Australian   Defence   Simulation    - Status

Australian Defence Simulation - Status PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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2. . . Graduates of Army Pilots' Course No.4 wait patiently for their turn in the simulator. 3. Outline. Overview of ADO and outcomesAustralian Simulation GovernanceCurrent

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Australian Defence Simulation - Status

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1. 1 Australian Defence Simulation - Status

2. 2 Australia’s simulation capability is not as backward as some may think. This first Australian presentation to the NATO Modelling and Simulation Group will provide some insight into Australia’s many simulation activities and help in bonding a strong, lasting, relationship with NATO to achieve common objectives. Australia’s simulation capability is not as backward as some may think. This first Australian presentation to the NATO Modelling and Simulation Group will provide some insight into Australia’s many simulation activities and help in bonding a strong, lasting, relationship with NATO to achieve common objectives.

3. 3 Outline Overview of ADO and outcomes Australian Simulation Governance Current & Future Simulation Activities Australia and NMSG Relationship Australian Simulation Challenges Contacting ADSO My presentation will cover these areas. My presentation will cover these areas.

4. 4 Current Operations Australia has a population of about 20 million people and of these we have an Army of around 25,000, and Navy and Air Force of about 13,000 each. These forces are required to defend a significant land and maritime region. They are also required to deploy on operations throughout the globe as shown by this current graphic of current Australian operations. On average 6-11% of our forces have been deployed over the last few years which challenges our force structure and preparedness planners.Australia has a population of about 20 million people and of these we have an Army of around 25,000, and Navy and Air Force of about 13,000 each. These forces are required to defend a significant land and maritime region. They are also required to deploy on operations throughout the globe as shown by this current graphic of current Australian operations. On average 6-11% of our forces have been deployed over the last few years which challenges our force structure and preparedness planners.

5. 5 The Australian Defence Organisation is shown here and consists of 13 primary groups. Each of these group heads sit on the most senior Defence management board known as the Defence Committee. The Australian Defence Organisation is shown here and consists of 13 primary groups. Each of these group heads sit on the most senior Defence management board known as the Defence Committee.

6. 6 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE RUSSELL OFFICES - CANBERRA From a simulation perspective we have five key Defence Committee champions. Lieutenant General Hurley has responsibility for overall simulation governance within Defence, Lieutenant General Gillespie has responsibility for Joint Simulation and the service chiefs responsibility for their particular simulation environments.From a simulation perspective we have five key Defence Committee champions. Lieutenant General Hurley has responsibility for overall simulation governance within Defence, Lieutenant General Gillespie has responsibility for Joint Simulation and the service chiefs responsibility for their particular simulation environments.

7. 7 Simulation in Australia is being developed to support two Defence Outcomes, namely, ‘Developing the Force’ and ‘Employing the Force’. The underlying functions of each Outcome are shown in this diagram, along with each stakeholder.Simulation in Australia is being developed to support two Defence Outcomes, namely, ‘Developing the Force’ and ‘Employing the Force’. The underlying functions of each Outcome are shown in this diagram, along with each stakeholder.

8. 8 Defence Simulation Capability This simulation support will be in the form of the Defence Simulation Capability. ADSO is progressively developing the Defence Synthetic Environment which will pull the individual capabilities together into a combined capability as required. You will see examples of this later I the presentation.This simulation support will be in the form of the Defence Simulation Capability. ADSO is progressively developing the Defence Synthetic Environment which will pull the individual capabilities together into a combined capability as required. You will see examples of this later I the presentation.

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10. 10 ADSO is a Branch within CDE located in R1, Russell Offices The Australian Defence Simulation Office (ADSO) is a Branch of CDE led by Dr Ed Kruzins, the Director General, Simulation, who reports directly to CCDE. CCDE as noted previously, has the role of providing Simulation Governance for Defence.The Australian Defence Simulation Office (ADSO) is a Branch of CDE led by Dr Ed Kruzins, the Director General, Simulation, who reports directly to CCDE. CCDE as noted previously, has the role of providing Simulation Governance for Defence.

11. 11 Australian Defence Simulation Office Roles - DI(G) OPS 42-1 policy direction co-ordination collaboration DGSIM - Chair DSF (Defence Simulation Forum) reporting to Chief CDE who leads Governance Influence Defence investment in Simulation Manage Simulation Minors Program Manage Defence Simulation Panel As directed in the Defence Simulation Policy, ADSO has three broad roles of policy direction, collaboration and coordination of simulation activities across Defence. Specific responsibilities are directed in the policy. We gain Group consensus and agreement on simulation via the Defence Simulation Forum which reports to CCDE. The Australian Defence Simulation Office provides the Chair (DGSIM) and Secretariat roles to the DSF. The other members consist of 1 star representation from each Defence Group. Through our position within CDE we influence the take up of simulation within projects. We also administer the Defence Simulation Minors Program and the Defence Simulation Panel. As directed in the Defence Simulation Policy, ADSO has three broad roles of policy direction, collaboration and coordination of simulation activities across Defence. Specific responsibilities are directed in the policy. We gain Group consensus and agreement on simulation via the Defence Simulation Forum which reports to CCDE. The Australian Defence Simulation Office provides the Chair (DGSIM) and Secretariat roles to the DSF. The other members consist of 1 star representation from each Defence Group. Through our position within CDE we influence the take up of simulation within projects. We also administer the Defence Simulation Minors Program and the Defence Simulation Panel.

12. 12 Defence Simulation Policy - DI(G) OPS 42-1 Vision: Defence exploits simulation to develop, train for, prepare for and test military options for government wherever it can enhance capabilities save resources reduce risk Our Defence-wide policy on simulation can be summarised as follows: Vision: Defence exploits simulation to develop, train for, prepare for and test military options for government wherever it can enhance capabilities save resources reduce riskOur Defence-wide policy on simulation can be summarised as follows: Vision: Defence exploits simulation to develop, train for, prepare for and test military options for government wherever it can enhance capabilities save resources reduce risk

13. 13 By progressing implementation of the Defence Simulation Plan and investment in the nine simulation application areas cited in the Policy we will be able to achieve the three important Defence goals of Enhancing Capability, Saving Resources, and Reducing Risk.By progressing implementation of the Defence Simulation Plan and investment in the nine simulation application areas cited in the Policy we will be able to achieve the three important Defence goals of Enhancing Capability, Saving Resources, and Reducing Risk.

14. 14 Defence Simulation Roadmap 2006 We are almost complete in developing the first version of the Defence Simulation Roadmap that will focus our efforts in meeting the Defence Outcomes. It will also allow us to plan for simulation development on an ‘Enterprise’ basis that will also require support from industry and overseas organisations.We are almost complete in developing the first version of the Defence Simulation Roadmap that will focus our efforts in meeting the Defence Outcomes. It will also allow us to plan for simulation development on an ‘Enterprise’ basis that will also require support from industry and overseas organisations.

15. 15 The Defence Simulation Manual (SIMMAN) is a repository of all Defence simulation governance documents. It consists of two volumes with the first volume concentrating on laying the foundations for Defence Simulation Management, and the second volume providing guidance on the simulation application and how they interface to existing Defence processes. Here you can see the 16 Parts to Volume 1 and 4 Parts to Volume 2. The purple indicates undeveloped work. The Defence Simulation Manual (SIMMAN) is a repository of all Defence simulation governance documents. It consists of two volumes with the first volume concentrating on laying the foundations for Defence Simulation Management, and the second volume providing guidance on the simulation application and how they interface to existing Defence processes. Here you can see the 16 Parts to Volume 1 and 4 Parts to Volume 2. The purple indicates undeveloped work.

16. 16 Convince the leadership Deliver Defence-related examples from Australia and overseas that show clearly how simulation has indeed: Enhanced Capabilities Saved Resources Reduced Risk If there is one governance message I would like to leave in your minds it is this one: ‘Convincing the Leadership’ of the Benefits of simulation to enhance capability, save resources and reduce risk across all application areas.If there is one governance message I would like to leave in your minds it is this one: ‘Convincing the Leadership’ of the Benefits of simulation to enhance capability, save resources and reduce risk across all application areas.

17. 17 Simulation “Return on Investment” ADSO has been collecting ROI information through industry and Defence Simple, one page with four areas Information requested Description of Simulation Project/Component Defence Capabilities Enhanced Resources Saved Risks Reduced One activity we have in motion is to collect Return on Investment information on a national and international basis. We store this information in the Simulation Benefits Guide, soon to be incorporated into the Simulation Investment Reference Guide. This information is available to all via our internet website and Australia would appreciate any NMSG case studies that could be forwarded to us for inclusion in this repository. One activity we have in motion is to collect Return on Investment information on a national and international basis. We store this information in the Simulation Benefits Guide, soon to be incorporated into the Simulation Investment Reference Guide. This information is available to all via our internet website and Australia would appreciate any NMSG case studies that could be forwarded to us for inclusion in this repository.

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19. 19 Cumulative Future Investment in Defence Simulation Australia has invested significantly into its simulation capability and will continue to do so into the future. There will always be the question of whether this future spend is enough but we must understand we are operating in a high tempo environment and the cost/benefit analysis for simulation must show significant return on investment.Australia has invested significantly into its simulation capability and will continue to do so into the future. There will always be the question of whether this future spend is enough but we must understand we are operating in a high tempo environment and the cost/benefit analysis for simulation must show significant return on investment.

20. 20 ADO Simulation Precincts This slide shows the major Australian Defence Organisation simulation precincts. This clearly shows the diversity of simulation use in the AOD.This slide shows the major Australian Defence Organisation simulation precincts. This clearly shows the diversity of simulation use in the AOD.

21. 21 Defence Science and Technology Organisation Our Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) is a significant user of simulation in Defence and has a coordinating body known as the DSTO Simulation Hub. DSTO are investigating the federating of their simulation battlelabs as part of the Defence Experimentation Initiative.Our Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) is a significant user of simulation in Defence and has a coordinating body known as the DSTO Simulation Hub. DSTO are investigating the federating of their simulation battlelabs as part of the Defence Experimentation Initiative.

22. 22 Navy Some of Navy’s significant simulation capabilities are shown here. The Maritime Warfare Training System is aimed at enhancing warfare command team training and combatant fleet operational readiness. It is used to conduct synthetic training exercises with the US Pacific Fleet and will most likely directly support Exercise RIMPAC in the future.Some of Navy’s significant simulation capabilities are shown here. The Maritime Warfare Training System is aimed at enhancing warfare command team training and combatant fleet operational readiness. It is used to conduct synthetic training exercises with the US Pacific Fleet and will most likely directly support Exercise RIMPAC in the future.

23. 23 Air Force Air Force has primarily a simulator capability for training aircrew. The Air Defence Ground Environment Simulation provides virtual simulation training for air defence personnel. The Air Force aims to develop its LVC technology to support multinational exercise Pitch Black in 2008.Air Force has primarily a simulator capability for training aircrew. The Air Defence Ground Environment Simulation provides virtual simulation training for air defence personnel. The Air Force aims to develop its LVC technology to support multinational exercise Pitch Black in 2008.

24. 24 Army Army has come a long way in the last few years with the introduction of its Battle Simulation Centres and Combat Training Centre for individual and collective training. It has also a long standing simulation capability to support the Land Command Battle Laboratory. Army will continue to develop its simulation capability in these centres and support joint simulation initiatives.Army has come a long way in the last few years with the introduction of its Battle Simulation Centres and Combat Training Centre for individual and collective training. It has also a long standing simulation capability to support the Land Command Battle Laboratory. Army will continue to develop its simulation capability in these centres and support joint simulation initiatives.

25. 25 Joint Operations Command JTLS JSAF Introducing simulation into warfare courses JCTC Simulation System will transition to JOC for exercises: Talisman Sabre Vital prospect The Australian Defence Warfare Centre currently utilise JTLS and JSAF for joint command training. They aim to introduce simulation into their joint warfare courses. The Joint Combined Training Centre (addressed later in this presentation) will transition to Joint Operations Command to support the Talisman Sabre and Vital prospect exercises.The Australian Defence Warfare Centre currently utilise JTLS and JSAF for joint command training. They aim to introduce simulation into their joint warfare courses. The Joint Combined Training Centre (addressed later in this presentation) will transition to Joint Operations Command to support the Talisman Sabre and Vital prospect exercises.

26. 26 Defence Canberra Based Simulation Centre Defence Synthetic Environment Joint Combined Training Centre (JCTC) Defence is currently investigating a Canberra Based Simulation Centre (CBSC) to offer a distributed hub for Canberra based decision makers by: 1. providing supporting functions such as concept and capability development, decision support, and mission planning. 2. making available the appropriate range of industrial, scientific and defence simulation facilities via distributed connectivity. The DSE is the component of the Defence Simulation Capability, which provides the ADO with an adaptive, responsive and pervasive capability to combine existing and evolving elements of simulation Capability to support Defence outcomes with an initial focus on collective training, operations, and concept and capability development.Defence is currently investigating a Canberra Based Simulation Centre (CBSC) to offer a distributed hub for Canberra based decision makers by: 1. providing supporting functions such as concept and capability development, decision support, and mission planning. 2. making available the appropriate range of industrial, scientific and defence simulation facilities via distributed connectivity. The DSE is the component of the Defence Simulation Capability, which provides the ADO with an adaptive, responsive and pervasive capability to combine existing and evolving elements of simulation Capability to support Defence outcomes with an initial focus on collective training, operations, and concept and capability development.

27. 27 JCTC Vision ‘Enhanced high-end, bilateral training in order to increase and measure operational capability and preparedness, improve interoperability, and facilitate capability development.’ The JCTC is a combined US/AUS project aimed at providing Live, Virtual and constructive simulation support to Exercise Talisman Sabre 07. ADSO will booth 2277 at IITSEC 2006 and will conduct a low level demonstration of the JCTC. The team will be more than happy to discuss JCTC in greater detail as well as taking any general Australian simulation questions you may have.The JCTC is a combined US/AUS project aimed at providing Live, Virtual and constructive simulation support to Exercise Talisman Sabre 07. ADSO will booth 2277 at IITSEC 2006 and will conduct a low level demonstration of the JCTC. The team will be more than happy to discuss JCTC in greater detail as well as taking any general Australian simulation questions you may have.

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29. 29 MSG : Exploiting Commercial Games for Military Use Australia has considerable experience Commercial Games Policy (see web) Currently utilise at least 8 Games products (VBS, Steel beasts, Uncommon Valour, Decisive Action, TACOPS, Combat Mission, Harpoon3, MS Flight Simulator) Some used for mission readiness for operational troops Continually reviewing others Still areas to be exploited – leadership, medical, first responders Australia has been a committed member of this working group since 2004 Australia will be a participant in an unclassified gaming activity with The Netherlands, Sweden and Canada utilising VBS and Steel Beasts.

30. 30 Adaption of Military Games -Training from Historical Campaigns Here are some Australian products utilising Military Games.Here are some Australian products utilising Military Games.

31. 31 NATO SG61 – Virtual Ships Australia is also a member of NATO SG61 – Virtual Ships. To date we have played a significant role in developing a STANAG and are a participating nation on the draft virtual ships MOU.Australia is also a member of NATO SG61 – Virtual Ships. To date we have played a significant role in developing a STANAG and are a participating nation on the draft virtual ships MOU.

32. 32 Future Australian Involvement MSG-027 Pathfinder MSG-030 Simulation Based Acquisition MSG-031 Cost effectiveness of M&S MSG -032 Urban Combat MSG-046 M&S for NEC Joint sim for training and planning support To continue Australia’s ongoing relationship with NATO, we would welcome involvement in the following MSG activities.To continue Australia’s ongoing relationship with NATO, we would welcome involvement in the following MSG activities.

33. 33 Culture Resources Coordination Data Geography Certification and accreditation Culture: The military environment is one deeply ingrained in tradition and military judgement. Although, simulation technology is welcomed, it is often pushed aside for more traditional methods, some of which do not realise the cost and benefits (e.g. training fidelity) that simulation can offer. Simulation awareness programs are in progress within Australia to overcome this challenge. One example is the list of simulation case studies (both national and international) in the Defence Simulation Benefits Guide that we are continuously seeking to increase. Resources: With a small Defence force and the current tempo of operations and capability development the competition for resources is fierce. It is imperative that simulation show a real cost saving to satisfy our financial gatekeepers. Additionally, as Australia consists of only 20 million people, finding people with skills in simulation is difficult. Australia is gradually building up a simulation education program to overcome this challenge. Coordination: The challenge here is not only to make organisations aware of what each is doing but also getting them to work and share resources to overcome a common problems. A small Defence force makes this less challenging for Australia as opposed to some other countries, but still remains a challenge. Data: Availability and management of ‘credible’ data for simulation remains a significant challenge for us. The challenge is amplified by the response times for fidelity data required for some of our more recent operations. Geography: Australia, in distance terms, is a long way from our northern NATO colleagues. The challenge of effective collaboration with our northern neighbours still remains but is improving. Additionally, the physical distance between Australia’s simulation centre’s is significant and challenges close working relationships. Certification & Accreditation: With the increased uptake of simulation both within the AOD and Defence industry the ability to effectively conduct simulation certification (safety and security) and accreditation will continue to be demanding. However, Australia does have a Verification, Validation and Accreditation Policy (Draft) and Guide in place to assist this process. Culture: The military environment is one deeply ingrained in tradition and military judgement. Although, simulation technology is welcomed, it is often pushed aside for more traditional methods, some of which do not realise the cost and benefits (e.g. training fidelity) that simulation can offer. Simulation awareness programs are in progress within Australia to overcome this challenge. One example is the list of simulation case studies (both national and international) in the Defence Simulation Benefits Guide that we are continuously seeking to increase. Resources: With a small Defence force and the current tempo of operations and capability development the competition for resources is fierce. It is imperative that simulation show a real cost saving to satisfy our financial gatekeepers. Additionally, as Australia consists of only 20 million people, finding people with skills in simulation is difficult. Australia is gradually building up a simulation education program to overcome this challenge. Coordination: The challenge here is not only to make organisations aware of what each is doing but also getting them to work and share resources to overcome a common problems. A small Defence force makes this less challenging for Australia as opposed to some other countries, but still remains a challenge. Data: Availability and management of ‘credible’ data for simulation remains a significant challenge for us. The challenge is amplified by the response times for fidelity data required for some of our more recent operations. Geography: Australia, in distance terms, is a long way from our northern NATO colleagues. The challenge of effective collaboration with our northern neighbours still remains but is improving. Additionally, the physical distance between Australia’s simulation centre’s is significant and challenges close working relationships. Certification & Accreditation: With the increased uptake of simulation both within the AOD and Defence industry the ability to effectively conduct simulation certification (safety and security) and accreditation will continue to be demanding. However, Australia does have a Verification, Validation and Accreditation Policy (Draft) and Guide in place to assist this process.

34. 34 Contacting ADSO

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