Goals
This presentation is the property of its rightful owner.
Sponsored Links
1 / 82

Goals PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 94 Views
  • Uploaded on
  • Presentation posted in: General

Goals. Install Active Directory Verify Active Directory installation Introduce operations master roles View the operations master role assignments for a domain Transfer operations master roles Implement an organizational unit structure within a domain Examine application data partitions

Download Presentation

Goals

An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Presentation Transcript


Goals

Goals

  • Install Active Directory

  • Verify Active Directory installation

  • Introduce operations master roles

  • View the operations master role assignments for a domain

  • Transfer operations master roles

  • Implement an organizational unit structure within a domain

  • Examine application data partitions

  • Prepare for schema modifications


Goals

(Skill 1)

Installing Active Directory

  • To organize objects and implement domain structure

    • Install Active Directory on a Windows Server 2003 computer using the Active Directory Installation Wizard

    • During first time installation

      • Create the root domain, a new domain tree, and a new forest

      • Designate a Windows Server 2003 computer as a domain controller


Goals

(Skill 1)

Installing Active Directory (2)

  • Creating a domain

    • By default, the domain is configured to run in Windows 2000 mixed mode

    • Windows 2000 mixed mode allows various domain controllers to coexist

      • Windows NT 4.0 backup domain controllers (BDCs)

      • Windows 2000 domain controllers (DCs)

      • Windows Server 2003 domain controllers (DCs)


Goals

(Skill 1)

Installing Active Directory (3)

  • If your network consists of only Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 domain controllers, switch to Windows 2000 native mode

    • Windows 2000 native mode supports only

      • Windows 2000 domain controllers

      • Windows Server 2003 domain controllers

  • Windows 2000 mixed mode and native mode are identical to those available in Windows 2000


Goals

(Skill 1)

Installing Active Directory (4)

  • Windows Server 2003 provides two new modes

    • Windows Server 2003 mode

      • Only supports Windows Server 2003 domain controllers

      • Gives you the additional ability to rename domain controllers at any time

    • Windows Server 2003 interim modeis used when you upgrade a Windows NT 4.0 primary domain controller (PDC) to Windows Server 2003


Goals

(Skill 1)

Installing Active Directory (5)

  • During Active Directory installation, three components are installed

    • Domain Name System (DNS) service

    • Database and database log files

    • Shared system volume


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-1Active Directory installation


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-2 Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-3 Running Dcpromo


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-4 Detecting network settings


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-5 The Server Role screen


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-6 The Operating System Compatibility screen


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-7 The Domain Controller Type screen


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-8 The Create New Domain screen


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-9 The Permissions screen


Goals

(Skill 1)

Figure 2-10 Adding a client to a domain


Goals

(Skill 2)

Verifying Active Directory Installation

  • After you install Active Directory on the first domain controller, you may need to add additional Active Directory domain controllers

  • Before installing additional domain controllers

    • You need installation-critical information from Active Directory

    • You must verify the initial installation to make sure certain components were successfully installed


Goals

(Skill 2)

Verifying Active Directory Installation (2)

  • Use the Active Directory Users and Computersconsole to verify an Active Directory installation

    • Use this console, which is an administrative tool, to create and delete objects, set their permissions, and modify their properties

    • Use this console to control primary objects

      • Organizational units (OUs)

      • Windows Server 2003 user accounts, group accounts, computer accounts

      • Published printers


Goals

(Skill 2)

Verifying Active Directory Installation (3)

  • Verifying an Active Directory installation

    • Verify the presence of the domain that you specified during the Active Directory installation

    • Verify the presence of your new domain controller in the domain controllers OU

  • The presence of certain administrative tools also verifies that Active Directory was successfully installed

    • Active Directory and Trusts console

    • Active Directory Sites and Services console


Goals

(Skill 2)

Verifying Active Directory Installation (4)

  • Use the Active Directory Domains and Trusts console

    • To manage the trust relationships between two or more domains in the same forest or different forests

    • To provide interoperability with other domains

    • To raise the domain functional level for a domain

    • To transfer the domain naming master role from one domain controller to another

    • To add or remove alternate User Principal Name (UPN) suffixes to/from user logon names


Goals

(Skill 2)

Figure 2-11 The Active Directory Domains and Trusts console


Goals

(Skill 2)

Verifying Active Directory Installation (5)

  • Use the Active Directory Sites and Services console

    • To create sites and subnets

    • To move domain controllers to the correct sites

    • To configure servers as global catalog servers

    • To create site links

    • This information is used to decide the replication method for directory information and to process service requests


Goals

(Skill 2)

Figure 2-12 The Active Directory Sites and Services console


Goals

(Skill 2)

Figure 2-13 Verifying the presence of a domain controller


Goals

(Skill 2)

Figure 2-14 The Sysvol directory


Goals

(Skill 2)

Figure 2-15 The Ntds folder


Goals

(Skill 2)

Verifying Active Directory Installation (6)

  • In addition to the three default consoles, you can also install an additional tool called the Active Directory Schema snap-in

    • Permits you to view and modify the schema

    • The schema defines the types of objects and the type of information pertaining to those objects that can be stored in Active Directory


Goals

(Skill 2)

Figure 2-16 The Active Directory Schema snap-in installed


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles

  • Replication models

    • Multi-master replication model

      • Used to control most functions

      • All domain controllers have the ability to modify Active Directory

    • Single-master model

      • Used when a single domain controller modifies data to control certain types of events in Active Directory


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (2)

  • Each of these special functions is controlled by FSMO (Flexible Single Masters of Operations) servers or, more typically, operations masters

  • Types of special functions

    • Forest-wide operations master roles

    • Domain-wide operations master roles


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (3)

  • Forest-wide operations master roles

    • Two forest-wide FSMO roles

      • Schema master role

      • Domain naming master role

    • Each of these roles can reside on only a single server for the entire forest

    • By default, both roles will be held by the first domain controller created in the root domain of the forest


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (4)

  • Domain-wide operations master roles

    • Three domain-wide roles

      • Primary domain controller (PDC) emulator role

      • Relative ID (RID) master role

      • Infrastructure master role

    • Each of these roles can reside on only a single domain controller in each domain

    • By default, all three roles will be held by the first domain controller created in each domain


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (5)

  • When you create the first domain in a new forest, by default, all five operations master roles are assigned to the first domain controller in that domain

  • Active Directory assigns only the domain-wide operations master roles to the first domain controller of any subsequent child domains that you create in the forest

  • The first domain controller in each of the other domains holds the domain-wide operations master roles


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (6)

  • Guidelines for planning operations master roles for per-forest roles

    • Assign the two forest-wide roles to a high-uptime server; backups of this machine are of special importance

    • Assign the schema master and the domain naming master roles to a single domain controller in one of the domains in the forest


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (7)

  • Guidelines for planning operations master roles for per-domain roles

    • Have at least one additional domain controller act as a standby operations master for other operations masters

    • If a domain controller fails, the standby domain controller can be manually configured to seize the failed domain controller’s roles


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (8)

  • Guidelines for planning operations master roles for per-domain roles

    • Assign both the RID master and the PDC emulator roles to the same domain controller

    • If the domain is large, these roles can be assigned to separate domain controllers to reduce the load on the PDC emulator

    • Make sure these servers are always capable of communicating with each other


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (9)

  • Guidelines for planning operations master roles for per-domain roles

    • If there is more than one domain, do not assign the infrastructure master role to a domain controller that is hosting the global catalog service

    • Global catalog

      • Stores information about objects in a tree or a forest

      • When this information changes, the global catalog updates the information through replication and always contains the latest information about objects


Goals

(Skill 3)

Introducing Operations Master Roles (10)

  • Guidelines for planning operations master roles for per-domain roles

    • If you assign the infrastructure master role to a domain controller that is also a global catalog server, the infrastructure master will not function properly, because there are no “phantom” references for it to update

    • If possible, try to place the domain naming master on a server hosting the global catalog


Goals

(Skill 4)

Viewing the Operations Master Role Assignments for a Domain

  • To monitor the operations master roles, you must identify and view the domain controllers that hold the roles

  • Regular monitoring of the operations masters roles in a domain or forest

    • Enables you to determine the performance and load on each of the operations masters

    • This enables you to decide which roles must be transferred to other domain controllers


Goals

(Skill 4)

Viewing the Operations Master Role Assignments for a Domain (2)

  • To view all of the domain-wide operations master role assignments, use the Active Directory Users and Computers console

  • To view the schema master and the domain naming master roles, use the Active Directory Schema snap-in and the Active Directory Domains and Trusts console


Goals

(Skill 4)

Figure 2-17 Viewing the default domain-wide operations master role assignments


Goals

(Skill 4)

Figure 2-18 The Change Schema Master dialog box


Goals

(Skill 4)

Figure 2-19 The Change Operations Master dialog box


Goals

(Skill 5)

Transferring Operations Master Roles

  • After you have identified the domain controllers that hold the operations master roles, you can easily transfer roles between domain controllers

  • Conditions requiring that you transfer operations master roles

    • When you want to change the default operations master because the domain controller is unavailable for replication

    • When the performance of the domain controller holding the operations master role is deteriorating due to excess load


Goals

(Skill 5)

Transferring Operations Master Roles (2)

  • You can transfer operations master roles between domain controllers within a forest, as well as within domains, with the assistance of the original operations master

  • To transfer an operations master role from one domain controller to another, make sure that both domain controllers are available and connected to each other through the network


Goals

(Skill 5)

Transferring Operations Master Roles (3)

  • Transferring an operations master role is a two-stage process

    • Connect to the new domain controller that will hold the role

    • Transfer the role to the domain controller you have identified


Goals

(Skill 5)

Transferring Operations Master Roles (4)

  • You use the Active Directory Users and Computers console to transfer the relative ID master, PDC emulator, and infrastructure master roles

  • You use the Active Directory Domains and Trusts console to transfer the domain naming master role


Goals

(Skill 5)

Transferring Operations Master Roles (5)

  • Failure of an operations master

    • An operations master may be unavailable due to a system failure

    • If there is any chance of recovering it, you should do so

    • If you cannot recover it, you can force the transfer of the operations master role to another Windows Server 2003 domain controller without the cooperation of the existing owner of the roles

      • This process is called seizing the role

      • Use the Ntdsutil.exe utility at the command prompt to seize any operations master role


Goals

(Skill 6)

Implementing an Organizational Unit Structure within a Domain

  • Planning and creating an organizational unit (OU) structure is the last activity you perform to complete the implementation of Active Directory

  • OUs are container objects used to organize objects in a domain into logical groups to centralize and simplify administration of a large number of objects

  • You can manage users easily and efficiently in an OU

  • In a multiple-domain model, each domain implements its own OU hierarchy


Goals

(Skill 6)

Implementing an Organizational Unit Structure within a Domain (2)

  • Advantages of creating OUs

    • You can apply Group Policy to a particular group of users or computers independently of other groups of users and computers in other OUs

    • You can structure a domain

      • According to the departments and locations in your organization

      • Without OUs, all users are maintained in a single list under a domain


Goals

(Skill 6)

Implementing an Organizational Unit Structure within a Domain (3)

  • Advantages of creating OUs

    • You can delegate administrative control over network resources to users

    • You can easily accommodate any changes that take place in the structure of your organization, for example, reorganizing users between OUs requires less time and effort than reorganizing users between domains


Goals

(Skill 6)

Implementing an Organizational Unit Structure within a Domain (4)

  • Advantages of creating OUs

    • OUs simplify the viewing and administration of directory objects within a domain

    • OUs allow administrators to have easy access to all objects at any level of the hierarchy

  • Plan your OU structure carefully so the organizational units represent your organization in a meaningful and manageable way


Goals

(Skill 6)

Implementing an Organizational Unit Structure within a Domain (5)

  • Three standard models are typically used to design an OU hierarchy

    • Business function-based

    • Geographically-based

    • A combination of both business function and geographically-based


Goals

(Skill 6)

Implementing an Organizational Unit Structure within a Domain (6)

  • Use the business function-based model to create an OU structure that reflects the various business functions within an organization

  • Use the geographically-based model to create an OU structure that represents the location of branches in an organization


Goals

(Skill 6)

Figure 2-20 A business function-based OU structure


Goals

(Skill 6)

Figure 2-21 A geographically-based OU structure


Goals

(Skill 6)

Implementing an Organizational Unit Structure within a Domain (7)

  • Use a combination of business function and geographically-based models to create an OU structure that reflects the various business functions within the different branches of an organization


Goals

(Skill 6)

Figure 2-22 A business function and geographically-based OU structure


Goals

(Skill 6)

Figure 2-23 Creating an organizational unit


Goals

(Skill 6)

Implementing an Organizational Unit Structure within a Domain (8)

  • Each OU you create contains a set of default properties

  • Each OU also has additional properties

    • Properties are attributes you use to locate the OU

    • Use the Active Directory Users and Computers console to set the properties


Goals

(Skill 6)

Figure 2-24 MKTG Properties dialog box


Goals

(Skill 7)

Understanding Application Data Partitions

  • Application data partitions

    • Are special database structures within Active Directory

    • They hold information specific to a particular application

  • To fully understand why they are necessary, you must first understand how they function in Active Directory


Goals

(Skill 7)

Understanding Application Data Partitions (2)

  • A partitionin Active Directory is a section of the database

    • With its own root name (using LDAP distinguished names)

    • With its own replication topology

      • The critical principle is replication topology

      • Since all partitions have their own topology, information changes in one partition do not force replication to other partitions


Goals

(Skill 7)

Figure 2-25 Using application data partitions


Goals

(Skill 7)

Understanding Application Data Partitions (3)

  • Application data partitions have their own naming convention

    • Applies to DNS names and LDAP distinguished names

    • From the DNS side, an application data partition is typically configured as a child domain of an Active Directory domain

    • From the LDAP side, the partition has its own LDAP distinguished name


Goals

(Skill 7)

Understanding Application Data Partitions (4)

  • LDAP distinguished name

    • An LDAP naming convention that is used in most, if not all, LDAP compliant databases

    • Think of it as a path name describing the entire path to the object from within the database

    • LDAP names are particularly important because some of the advanced Active Directory utilities (such as Ntdsutil) require them


Goals

(Skill 7)

Understanding Application Data Partitions (5)

  • Administering application data partitions

    • Typically, you will not need to perform any real administration

    • Your application will usually create the partition for you, and perform all writes and changes

    • Common current applications that make use of application data partitions are DNS and TAPI

    • In certain cases, you may be required to create an application data partition


Goals

(Skill 7)

Understanding Application Data Partitions (6)

  • To create an application data partition, you can use Ntdsutil.exe, a raw LDAP editor, or Active Directory Services Interface (ADSI)

  • Ntdsutil is the most accessible of these tools

    • It is a powerful and versatile tool for making major modifications to the Active Directory database

    • Since it is a very powerful application, you have the potential for making major mistakes very quickly


Goals

(Skill 7)

Understanding Application Data Partitions (7)

  • Ntdsutil command line utility

    • Must be run in Directory Services Restore Mode on the domain controller on which you wish to make a change

    • Application data partitions can only be created by Enterprise Administrators

    • By default, the only Enterprise Administrator is the Administrator account in the forest root domain


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications

  • Schema

    • Considered the blueprint or rulebook for Active Directory

    • Defines the structure and rules for the Active Directory database

  • To understand more specifically what the schema does, you need to understand more about the structure of Active Directory


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (2)

  • Active Directory is composed of various types of objects

  • Each object is defined by its type, which is referred to as the object class

  • Each object classis defined by the attributes included in the class

    • Attributesare specific fields for the object that store a particular type of information

    • Different object classes can have different attributes, which are suited to the needs of the object


Goals

(Skill 8)

Figure 2-26 Object classes and attributes


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (3)

  • You can examine and change most of the attributes for an object class by opening the object class in the Active Directory Schema snap-in

    • You can add attributes to an existing class

    • You can create a new class using new or existing attributes to drastically change the functionality of Active Directory

    • This allows Active Directory to support your own customized applications and data


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (4)

  • A mistake made in the schema can have very severe consequences

  • Microsoft has put several safeguards in place to reduce the chance that mistakes may occur when you are viewing or editing the schema


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (5)

  • Some of Microsoft’s safeguards

    • Object classes and attributes can be deactivated, but they cannot be deleted

      • Deactivating a class results in the inability to create new objects in that class.

      • Deactivating an attribute results in the inability to add the attribute to other classes

    • Mandatory attributes of an existing class cannot be deactivated


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (6)

  • Some of Microsoft’s safeguards

    • Default attributes, which are required for Active Directory to function properly, cannot be deactivated

    • The schema can only be modified on the schema master

    • Only members of the Schema Admins group have permission to modify the schema, by default

    • The Active Directory Schema snap-in is not installed by default


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (7)

  • Precautions exist because of the scope of schema modifications

  • However, there are a few instances in which a schema modification is warranted


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (8)

  • Most commonly, schema modifications are performed for one of two reasons

    • To support business requirements, you may need to add a new attribute or class to the schema

    • To support new Active Directory-integrated applications that store a portion of their data in the Active Directory database, you may need to supply new attributes or classes


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (9)

  • If you choose to modify the schema in the Active Directory Schema snap-in, follow these precautions

    • Thoroughly evaluate the need for the schema modification and make sure that modifying the schema is the best solution

    • Specifically define the modification to be performed

    • Create a script or use another programmatic method to apply the modification and test it thoroughly in an offline environment


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (10)

  • Steps to modify the schema

    • Connect to the schema operations master, preferably using an account that is not a member of the Schema Admins group

    • Use the Run as facility to launch the application you are using to modify the schema as a member of the Schema Admins group


Goals

(Skill 8)

Preparing for Schema Modifications (11)

  • Steps to modify the schema

    • If the operations master is a Windows 2000 domain controller, enable writes on the schema

    • Modify the schema

    • If the operations master is a Windows 2000 domain controller, disable writes on the schema

    • Disconnect from the schema operations master


Goals

(Skill 8)

Figure 2-27 Viewing an object class in the Schema console


  • Login