Regular present tense verbs
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Regular Present Tense Verbs. Let’s talk about English verbs before discussing Spanish verbs. In both English and Spanish, there are six persons: Iwe (you & I, Juan & I) youyou all (you & your friend) he, she, itthey (Juan & Maria) (Juan, Maria, the book).

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Regular Present Tense Verbs

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Regular present tense verbs

Regular Present Tense Verbs


Regular present tense verbs

Let’s talk about English verbs before discussing Spanish verbs. In both English and Spanish, there are six persons:

Iwe (you & I, Juan & I)

youyou all (you & your friend)

he, she, itthey (Juan & Maria)

(Juan, Maria, the book)


Regular present tense verbs

All persons have their own verb form:

I amwe are

you areyou all are

he, she, it isthey are

It would be incorrect to say “I are” or “you is” or “we am.” You have to use a particular verb form with a particular subject.


Regular present tense verbs

Here are the Spanish pronouns that correspond to the English pronouns:

Iweyonosotros

youyou alltúvosotros

he, she, ittheyél, ellaellos


Regular present tense verbs

Here you have the verb “to talk” with the English subject pronouns:

I talk we talk

you talk you all talk

he, she, it talks they talk

Now look at the Spanish verb “hablar,” which means “to talk”:

yo hablonosotros hablamos

tú hablasvosotros habláis

él, ella hablaellos hablan


Regular present tense verbs

Let’s look at how we get all those verb forms:

yo hablonosotros hablamos

tú hablasvosotros habláis

él, ella hablaellos hablan

What you do is take off the –ar and add the following endings:

-o-amos

-as-áis

-a-an


Regular present tense verbs

-o-amos

-as-áis

-a-an

That’s how you conjugate any verb that ends with –ar:

nadar (to swim)llegar (to arrive)

nadonadamosllegollegamos

nadasnadáisllegasllegáis

nadanadanllegallegan


Regular present tense verbs

There’s one more thing you need to know before you’re ready for a practice exercise. A lot of languages have different ways to say “you” because you show more respect to some people than to others. In the southern U.S., the way we do that is by saying “ma’am” and “sir.” Spanish does it by having two ways to say “you” and two ways to say “you all.”

“Tú” means “you” when you’re talking to a friend.

“Usted” (abbreviated “Ud.”) means “you” when you’re talking to someone older or in authority, someone you call “Mr.” or “Mrs.” or “Dr.” rather than by the person’s first name.

“Vosotros” means “you all” when you’re talking to a group of friends.

“Ustedes” (abbreviated “Uds.”) means “you all” when you’re talking to a group of people who are older or in authority.


Regular present tense verbs

Now look how “Ud.” and “Uds.” fit into the verb paradigm:

yo hablonosotros hablamos

tú hablasvosotros habláis

él, ella, Ud. hablaellos, Uds. hablan

In spite of the fact that Ud., like tú, means “you,” it doesn’t get the same verb that tú gets. It gets the verb that él gets.

Likewise, in spite of the fact that Uds., like vosotros, means “you all,” it doesn’t get the verb that vosotros gets. It gets the verb that ellos gets.


Regular present tense verbs

Click here to go to a practice exercise.


Regular present tense verbs

There are two other types of regular verbs in Spanish: verbs that end in –er and verbs that end in –ir. Take off the –er and then add the following endings:

comer (to eat)

-o-emoscomocomemos

-es-éiscomescoméis

-e-encomecomen

Notice that the only difference between –er verbs and –ar verbs is that you use e’s instead of a’s:

-o-amos-o-emos

-as-áis-es-éis

-a-an-e-en


Regular present tense verbs

Now for –ir verbs. Drop the –ir and add the following endings:

abrir (to open)

-o-imosabroabrimos

-es-ísabresabrís

-e-enabreabren

Do you see what the difference is between –er and –ir verbs? They’re just alike except for the nosotros and vosotros forms:

-o-emos-o-imos

-es-éis-es-ís

-e-en-e-en


Regular present tense verbs

So the only difference between –ar verbs and –er verbs is that you use e’s instead of a’s in the –er verbs. And the only difference between –er verbs and –ir verbs is the nosotros and vosotros forms.


Regular present tense verbs

Click here to go to a practice exercise.


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