Pharmacodynamics
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Pharmacodynamics. LOCUS OF ACTION “RECEPTORS ”. TISSUE RESERVOIRS. Bound. Free. Free. Bound. ABSORPTION. EXCRETION. Free Drug. SYSTEMIC CIRCULATION. Bound Drug. BIOTRANSFORMATION. WHY BE CONCERNED ABOUT HOW DRUGS WORK?. AIDS MEMORIZATION OF:. FDA Approved and Unapproved Uses

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Pharmacodynamics

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Pharmacodynamics

Pharmacodynamics


Pharmacodynamics

LOCUS OF ACTION

“RECEPTORS”

TISSUE

RESERVOIRS

Bound

Free

Free

Bound

ABSORPTION

EXCRETION

Free Drug

SYSTEMIC

CIRCULATION

Bound Drug

BIOTRANSFORMATION


Pharmacodynamics

WHY BE CONCERNED ABOUT

HOW DRUGS WORK?

AIDS MEMORIZATION OF:

  • FDA Approved and Unapproved Uses

  • Interactions with Other Drugs

  • Adverse Effects and Contraindications


Pharmacodynamics

WHY BE CONCERNED ABOUT

HOW DRUGS WORK?

AIDS EVALUATION OF MEDICAL LITERATURE:

  • Better assessment of new modalities for using drugs

  • Better assessment of new indications for drugs

  • Better assessment of new concerns regarding risk-benefit


Pharmacodynamics

WHY BE CONCERNED ABOUT

HOW DRUGS WORK?

AIDS PATIENT-DOCTOR RELATIONSHIP:

The patient has more respect for and trust in a therapist who

can convey to the patient how the drug is affecting the

patient’s body.

A patient who understands his/her therapy is more inclined

to become an active participant in the management

of the patient’s disease.


Pharmacodynamics

WHY BE CONCERNED ABOUT

HOW DRUGS WORK?

PEACE OF MIND!

Knowledge of how a drug works increases the therapist’s

confidence that the drug is being used appropriately.


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK?

Most work by interacting with

endogenous proteins:

  • Some antagonize, block or inhibit endogenous proteins

  • Some activate endogenous proteins

  • A few have unconventional mechanisms of action


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS ANTAGONIZE, BLOCK OR INHIBIT ENDOGENOUS PROTEINS?

  • Antagonists of Cell Surface Receptors

  • Antagonists of Nuclear Receptors

  • Enzyme Inhibitors

  • Ion Channel Blockers

  • Transport Inhibitors

  • Inhibitors of Signal Transduction Proteins


Pharmacodynamics

Definition of RECEPTOR:

A macromolecular component of the organism that

binds the drug and initiates its effect.

Most receptors are proteins that have undergone various

post-translational modifications such as covalent

attachments of carbohydrate, lipid and phosphate.


Pharmacodynamics

Definition of CELL SURFACE RECEPTOR:

A receptor that is embedded in the cell membrane and functions

to receive chemical information from the extracellular

compartment and to transmit that information to

the intracellular compartment.


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY

ANTAGONIZING CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS?

KEY CONCEPTS:

  • Cell surface receptors exist to transmit chemical signals from

  • the outside to the inside of the cell.

  • Some compounds bind to cell surface receptors, yet do not

  • activate the receptors to trigger a response.

  • When cell surface receptors bind the molecule,

  • the endogenous chemical cannot bind to the

  • receptor and cannot trigger a response.

  • The compound is said to “antagonize” or “block” the receptor

  • and is referred to as a receptor antagonist.


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ANTAGONIZING

CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS?

Extracellular

Compartment

Unbound Endogenous Activator (Agonist) of Receptor

Cell Membrane

Inactive Cell Surface Receptor

Intracellular

Compartment


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ANTAGONIZING

CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS?

Extracellular

Compartment

Bound Endogenous Activator (Agonist) of Receptor

Cell Membrane

Active Cell Surface Receptor

Intracellular

Compartment

Cellular Response


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ANTAGONIZING

CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS?

Displaced Endogenous Activator (Agonist) of Receptor

Extracellular

Compartment

Bound Antagonist of Receptor (Drug)

Cell Membrane

Inactive Cell Surface Receptor Upon being Bound

Intracellular

Compartment


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ANTAGONIZING

CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS?

Footnote:

Most antagonists attach to binding site on receptor for

endogenous agonist and sterically prevent

endogenous agonist from binding.

If binding is reversible - Competitive antagonists

If binding is irreversible - Noncompetitive antagonists

However, antagonists may bind to remote site on receptor and

cause allosteric effects that displace endogenous agonist

or prevent endogenous agonist from

activating receptor. (Noncompetitive antagonists)


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ANTAGONIZING

CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS?

Displaced Endogenous Activator (Agonist) of Receptor

Extracellular

Compartment

Bound Antagonist of Receptor

Cell Membrane

Active Receptor

Inactive Receptor

Intracellular

Compartment

Allosteric Inhibitor


Pharmacodynamics

ARE DRUGS THAT ANTAGONIZE CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS CLINICALLY USEFUL?

Some important examples:

  • Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs) for high blood pressure,

  • heart failure, chronic renal insufficiency

  • (losartan [Cozaar®]; valsartan [Diovan®])

  • Beta-Adrenoceptor Blockers for angina, myocardial infarction,

  • heart failure, high blood pressure, performance anxiety

  • (propranolol [Inderal®]; atenolol [Tenormin®])


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ANTAGONIZING

NUCLEAR RECEPTORS?

Unbound Endogenous Activator

(Agonist) of Nuclear Receptor

Inactive Nuclear Receptor

in cytosolic compartment

DNA

Nucleus

Intracellular

Compartment

Inactive Nuclear Receptor

in nuclear compartment


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ANTAGONIZING

NUCLEAR RECEPTORS?

Active Nuclear Receptor

Bound Endogenous Activator

(Agonist) of Nuclear Receptor

DNA

Nucleus

Modulation of

Transcription

Intracellular

Compartment


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ANTAGONIZING

NUCLEAR RECEPTORS?

Displaced Endogenous Activator

(Agonist) of Nuclear Receptor

Bound Antagonist

of Receptor (Drug)

Inactive Nuclear Receptor

In Cytosolic Compartment

DNA

Nucleus

Intracellular

Compartment

Inactive Nuclear Receptor

In Nuclear Compartment


Pharmacodynamics

ARE DRUGS THAT ANTAGONIZE NUCLEAR

RECEPTORS CLINICALLY USEFUL?

Some important examples:

  • Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for edema due to

  • liver cirrhosis and for heart failure

  • (spironolactone [Aldactone®])

  • Estrogen Receptor Antagonists for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer (tamoxifen [Nolvadex®])


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS ANTAGONIZE, BLOCK OR INHIBIT ENDOGENOUS PROTEINS?

  • Antagonists of Cell Surface Receptors

  • Antagonists of Nuclear Receptors

  • Enzyme Inhibitors

  • Ion Channel Blockers

  • Transport Inhibitors

  • Inhibitors of Signal Transduction Proteins


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY INHIBITING ENZYMES?

Active Enzyme

Substrate

Product

Cellular Function

Inactive Enzyme

Substrate

Bound Enzyme

Inhibitor (Drug)


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY

INHIBITING ENZYMES?

KEY CONCEPTS:

  • Enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of products from substrates.

  • Some drugs bind to enzymes and inhibit enzymatic activity.

  • Loss of product due to enzyme inhibition mediates the

  • effects of enzyme inhibitors.


Pharmacodynamics

ARE DRUGS THAT INHIBIT ENZYMES

CLINICALLY USEFUL?

Some important examples:

  • Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors for pain relief,

  • particularly due to arthritis (aspirin; ibuprofen [Motrin®])

  • HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors for hypercholesterolemia

  • (atorvastatin [Lipitor®]; pravastatin [Pravachol®])

  • Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitors for

  • high blood pressure, heart failure, and

  • chronic renal insufficiency

  • (captopril [Capoten®]; ramipril [Altace®])


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS ANTAGONIZE, BLOCK OR INHIBIT ENDOGENOUS PROTEINS?

  • Antagonists of Cell Surface Receptors

  • Antagonists of Nuclear Receptors

  • Enzyme Inhibitors

  • Ion Channel Blockers

  • Transport Inhibitors

  • Inhibitors of Signal Transduction Proteins


Pharmacodynamics

ARE DRUGS THAT BLOCK ION

CHANNELS CLINICALLY USEFUL?

Some important examples:

  • Calcium Channel Blockers (CCBs) for angina and high blood pressure

  • (amlodipine [Norvasc®]; diltiazem [Cardizem®])

  • Sodium Channel Blockers to suppress cardiac arrhythmias

  • (lidocaine [Xylocaine®]; amiodarone [Cordarone®])


Pharmacodynamics

ARE DRUGS THAT INHIBIT TRANSPORTERS

CLINICALLY USEFUL?

Some important examples:

  • Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) for the

  • treatment of depression

  • (fluoxetine [Prozac®]; fluvoxamine [Luvox®])

  • Inhibitors of Na-2Cl-K Symporter (Loop Diuretics) in

  • renal epithelial cells to increase urine and sodium

  • output for the treatment of edema

  • (furosemide [Lasix®]; bumetanide [Bumex®])


Pharmacodynamics

ARE DRUGS THAT INHIBIT SIGNAL

TRANSDUCTION PROTEINS

CLINICALLY USEFUL?

Some important examples:

  • Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for chronic myelocytic leukemia

  • (imatinib [Gleevec®])

  • Type 5 Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors for erectile dysfunction

  • (sildenafil [Viagra®])

  • This is a major focus of drug development


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY ACTIVATING

ENDOGENOUS PROTEINS?

  • Agonists of Cell Surface Receptors

  • (e.g. alpha-agonists, morphine agonists)

  • Agonists of Nuclear Receptors

  • (e.g. HRT for menopause, steroids for inflammation)

  • Enzyme Activators

  • (e.g. nitroglycerine (guanylyl cyclase), pralidoxime)

  • Ion Channel Openers

  • (e.g. minoxidil (K) and alprazolam (Cl))


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO CHEMICALS WORK BY ACTIVATING

CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS?

KEY CONCEPTS:

  • Cell surface receptors exist to transmit chemical signals from

  • the outside to the inside of the cell.

  • Some chemicals bind to cell surface receptors and

  • trigger a response.

  • Chemicals in this group are called receptor agonists.

  • Some agonists are actually the endogenous chemical signal,

  • whereas other agonists mimic endogenous chemical signals.


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO CHEMICALS WORK BY

UNCONVENTIONAL MECHANISMS OF ACTION?

  • Disrupting of Structural Proteins

  • e.g. vinca alkaloids for cancer, colchicine for gout

  • Being Enzymes

  • e.g. streptokinase for thrombolysis

  • Covalently Linking to Macromolecules

  • e.g. cyclophosphamide for cancer

  • Reacting Chemically with Small Molecules

  • e.g. antacids for increased acidity

  • Binding Free Molecules or Atoms

  • e.g. drugs for heavy metal poisoning, infliximab (anti-TNF)


Pharmacodynamics

HOW DO DRUGS WORK BY UNCONVENTIONAL

MECHANISMS OF ACTION (Continued)?

  • Being Nutrients

  • e.g. vitamins, minerals

  • Exerting Actions Due to Physical Properties

  • e.g. mannitol (osmotic diuretic), laxatives

  • Working Via an Antisense Action

  • e.g. fomivirsen for CMV retininitis in AIDS

  • Being Antigens

  • e.g. vaccines

  • Having Unknown Mechanisms of Action

  • e.g. general anesthetics


Characteristics of drug receptor interactions

Characteristics of Drug-Receptor Interactions

  • Chemical Bond: ionic, hydrogen, hydrophobic, Van der Waals, and covalent.

  • Saturable

  • Competitive

  • Specific and Selective

  • Structure-activity relationships

  • Transduction mechanisms


Pharmacodynamics

NH4+-CH2(n)-NH4+


Receptor transduction mechanisms

Receptor Transduction Mechanisms

  • Ion channel linked receptors e.g. Ach nicotinic (Na+) and GABA (Cl-)

  • Second messenger generation,

    adenylate cyclase stimulation or inhibition - cAMP,

    guanylate cyclase - cGMP,

    phospholipase C - IP3, DAG

  • Some receptors are themselves protein kinases

  • Intracellular receptors (e.g. corticosteroids, thyroid hormone)


Pharmacodynamics

OCCUPATION THEORY OF DRUG-RECEPTOR INTERACTIONS

k1

D + R DR

k2

By Law of Mass Action: [D]•[R]•K1= [DR]•K2

Therefore K2 /K1 = [D]•[R]/[DR] = Kd

If RT = total # of receptors, then

RT = [R] + [DR]

Replace [R] by (RT-[DR]) and rearrange:

EFFECT

[DR] [D]

RT Kd + [D]

effect

=

=

Max. effect


Pharmacodynamics

effect[DR] [D]

Max. effectRT Kd + [D]

When [D] = Kd

[DR]

RT

=

=

= 0.5

1.00

0.75

[DR]/RT

0.50

0.25

0.00

5

10

15

0

20

[D]

Kd


Pharmacodynamics

Receptor Binding

% Bound

Kd

Concentration of Ligand

The dose-response relationship (from C.D. Klaassen, Casarett and Doull’s Toxicology, 5th ed., New York: McGraw-Hill, 1996).


Pharmacodynamics

Compounds Have Different Affinities for the Same Receptor

1.00

Kd=0.5

Kd=1

kd=5

0.75

0.50

[DR]/RT

0.25

0.00

0.01

0.10

1.00

10.00

100.00

[D]

(concentration units)


Pharmacodynamics

Types of Receptor Antagonists

Competitive

Noncompetitive


Pharmacodynamics

PARTIAL AGONISTS - EFFICACY

Even though drugs may occupy the same # of receptors, the magnitude of their effects may differ.

Full Agonist

1.0

Partial agonist

0.8

0.6

Partial agonist

% Maximal Effect

0.4

0.2

0.0

0.01

0.10

1.00

10.00

100.00

1000.00

[D]

(concentration units)


Pharmacodynamics

HOW TO EXPLAIN EFFICACY?

Drug (D)

The relative affinity

of the drug to either conformation will determine the effect of the drug

Ri

Ra

DRi

DRa

CONFORMATIONAL SELECTION


Pharmacodynamics

R

R2*

R1*

R3*

R2*

R1*

R

R

R2*

R1*

R3*

R3*

From Kenakin, T. Receptor conformational induction versus selection: all part of the same energy landscape. TiPS 1996;17:190-191.


Pharmacodynamics

Spare Receptors


Receptor regulation

Receptor Regulation

  • Sensitization or Up-regulation

    1. Prolonged/continuous use of receptor blocker

    2. Inhibition of synthesis or release of hormone/neurotransmitter - Denervation

  • Desensitization or Down-regulation

    1. Prolonged/continuous use of agonist

    2. Inhibition of degradation or uptake of agonist

    Homologous vs. Heterologous

    Uncoupling vs. Decreased Numbers


Pharmacodynamics

From Nies A and Speilberg SP. Principles of Therapeutics. in Goodman and Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. 9th edition, 1996. Pages 43-62.McGraw Hill,


Pharmacodynamics

ED50

GRADED DOSE-RESPONSE CURVE

ED50


Pharmacodynamics

Cumulative

Frequency Distribution

QUANTAL DOSE-RESPONSE CURVE

Frequency Distribution


Pharmacodynamics

Morphine

Aspirin


Pharmacodynamics

THERAPEUTIC INDEX – AN INDEX OF SAFETY

Death

Hypnosis


Pharmacodynamics

ED99A

ED50A

LD1A

LD1

Margin of Safety =

ED99


Causes of variability in drug response

Causes of Variability in Drug Response

Those related to the biological system

1. Body weight and size

2. Age and Sex

3. Genetics - pharmacogenetics

4. Condition of health

5. Placebo effect


Causes of variability in drug response1

Causes of Variability in Drug Response

  • Those related to the conditions of administration

    1. Dose, formulation, route of administration.

    2. Resulting from repeated administration of drug:

    drug resistance; drug tolerance-tachyphylaxis; drug allergy

    3. Drug interactions:

    chemical or physical;

    GI absorption;

    protein binding/distribution;

    metabolism (stimulation/inhibition);

    excretion (pH/transport processes);

    receptor (potentiation/antagonism);

    changes in pH or electrolytes.


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