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Funded by Grant #08-201 of the Commonwealth Neurotrauma Initiative Trust Fund, administered by VA Department of Rehabilitative Services. The WWRC Smart Cottage. Environmental AT for People with Disabilities Tony Gentry, PhD OTR/L. Funded by Grant #08-201 of the

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The WWRC Smart Cottage

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The wwrc smart cottage

Funded by Grant #08-201 of the

Commonwealth Neurotrauma Initiative Trust Fund,

administered by VA Department of Rehabilitative Services.

The WWRC Smart Cottage

  • Environmental AT for People with Disabilities

  • Tony Gentry, PhD OTR/L


Smart homes

Funded by Grant #08-201 of the

Commonwealth Neurotrauma Initiative Trust Fund,

administered by VA Department of Rehabilitative Services.


Why smart homes

Why Smart Homes?

  • We live there.

  • Safety & Security.

  • Health.

  • ADL/IADL.

  • Functional independence begins at home.


Technologies

Technologies:

  • Low-tech environmental organizers

  • Mid-tech appliances (alarm clock, kitchen timer)

  • Electronic Aids to Daily Living (lighting/appliance control)

  • Safety features (fire, smoke, water, injury alarm)

  • Task Cueing (PDA, pc, pillbox, lighting cues)

  • Cognitive Remediation (Wii and pc games)


Smart homes

Living Room


Smart homes

Study


Smart homes

Kitchen


Smart homes

Bedroom


Smart homes

Bedroom Sink


Smart homes

Bathroom


Smart homes

Medications


Safety options

Safety options

  • Bathroom tub bench, rails, hot water control

  • Stoveguard - turns off stove if kitchen unoccupied

  • Water leak alarms

  • Medic-alert bracelet

  • Voice-prompt fire alarm

  • Motion-controlled lighting

  • Telephone and calling schedule

  • Training in emergency management


Task cueing options

Task Cueing Options

  • PDA calendar alarm

  • Reminder pillbox

  • PC onscreen prompt

  • Kitchen timer/alarm clark

  • Automated light blink


Environmental management

Environmental Management

  • De-clutter -- “a place for everything...."

  • Drawer dividers

  • Closet dividers

  • Divided clothes hamper on wheels

  • Washing machine directions

  • Refrigerator file

  • Food expiration tag


Costs

Costs

  • Equipment Total: $3200

    • pc and EADL software: $600

    • Motion-controlled lighting: $500

    • Low-tech/mid-tech appliances: $500

    • Insteon pc-controlled lighting: $400

    • Video-cam for front door: $400

    • Stoveguard: $360

    • Nintendo Wii and Brain Age: $310

    • Palm z-22 pda: $100


Other costs

Other Costs:

  • Electrician to install motion-controlled lighting and Insteon wall switches (8 hours)

  • Therapist to assess client needs, collaborate with client in selection, installation, training and follow-along (will vary widely)

  • Replacement and upgrade costs of products (estimate over ten years)


Comments

Comments:

  • “That Stoveguard saved my life!”

  • “The Palm pilot really keeps me on schedule.”

  • “I feel safe here, even though I’m by myself.”

  • “Having the lights turn on and off saves energy and helps me see when I come home after dark.”

  • “At first it was a little spooky, but I got used to it.”

  • The water alarm went off and kept me from flooding the basement when I was washing my clothes.”

  • “I used the pillbox to schedule my blood pressure tests, too.”

  • “The Wii games are fun and keep me using my brain.”


Ot comments

OT Comments:

  • “We are learning the equipment, too, which takes time.”

  • “The safety alarms have saved the house at least 3 times already.”

  • “I wish they had more time in the house, to experiment with different strategies and really get the hang of it.”

  • “This house is like a lab, where we can try out stuff that may work at home.”

  • “These things will work for our spinal cord clients, too.”


Next steps

Next Steps:

  • Smart Suites in new wing of WWRC

  • Smart apartment and suites at McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center

  • Smart apartments at Faison School for Autism

  • Collaborate with “Blue Roof” and other smart technology teams to provide service to Virginians

  • Include passive-monitoring options for aging in place and off-site caregiver communication


Monitoring options

Monitoring Options:

  • Quiet-Care (www.quietcaresystems.com)

    • Wireless motion sensors/changes in routine noted

  • e-Neighbor (www.healthsense.com)

    • motion sensors/telehealth/medic-alert

  • Grandcare (www.grandcare.com)

    • set-top box on tv acts as communicator and control center for remote sensors


Resources

Resources

  • www.vcu.edu/partnership/pda

  • www.vacni.org

  • www.smarthome.com

  • www.epill.com

  • www.insteon.com

  • www.independentliving.com

  • www.abledata.org


References

References

Cook, A.M. & Hussey, S.M. (2002). Assistive Technologies: Principles and practice. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.

Gentry, T. (in press). Smart homes for people with neurological disability: State of the art. NeuroRehabilitation.


Smart homes

Tony Gentry, PhD OTR/LAssistant ProfessorDept. of Occupational TherapyDirector, Assistive Technology for Cognition LaboratoryVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmond, VA 23298logentry@vcu.edu(804) 828-3397Paula Martin, OTWoodrow Wilson Rehabilitation CenterDepartment of Occupational TherapyPO Box 1500Fishersville, VA 22939Paula.Martin@wwrc.virginia.gov


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