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Unit 8. Immigration Ms. Rybak – US History. Essential Questions . By the end of this unit you will be able to answer the following questions: What are the significant differences between the periods of “Old Migration” and “New Migration” in America?

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unit 8

Unit 8

Immigration

Ms. Rybak – US History

essential questions
Essential Questions
  • By the end of this unit you will be able to answer the following questions:
    • What are the significant differences between the periods of “Old Migration” and “New Migration” in America?
    • What is the main difference in the geographic origin of earlier immigrants and the more recent immigrants to the US?
    • Why might the term “salad bowl” be a more accurate metaphor than “melting pot” to describe the relationship between various ethic groups in America today?
timeline immigration
Timeline - Immigration
  • From approximately 1700-1800 label “old migration”
  • From approximately 1850-1925 label “new migration”
  • From 1925-end of timeline label as NOA period
  • At 1892 (estimate) label the opening of Ellis Island Immigration center
different periods of immigration
Different Periods of Immigration
  • “Old” Immigration (Colonial Period)
    • Dominated by the English
    • Other “English” speaking people; Scotch and Irish
    • Western and Northern Europeans: Dutch, Scandinavians, Germans
    • Africans (as forced labor – early slavery)
different periods of immigration1
Different Periods of Immigration
  • “Old” Immigration
    • Most came for religious or political freedom
    • Some came to improve their economic situation
    • Opportunities for new land
different periods of immigration2
Different Periods of Immigration
  • “Old” Immigration
    • These people became the US
    • They generally worked together and supported one another as newcomers in a new land
    • They often had common enough cultural traditions to reduce significant conflicts from occurring
different periods of immigration3
Different Periods of Immigration
  • “New Immigration” (Late 1800-Early 1900)
    • More from Eastern and Southern Europe
    • Asians from Japan and China
different periods of immigration4
Different Periods of Immigration
  • “New” Immigration
    • Better economic opportunities in the industrial centers of America (because of industrialization)
    • Religious Freedom (especially Russian Jews)
    • Some for political freedoms
different periods of immigration5
Different Periods of Immigration
  • “New” Immigration
    • A significant increase in anti-immigrant feelings or “Nativism”
    • The first considered themselves to be the true or “native” Americans and resented new immigrants
    • Significant cultural differences often created prejudice (Italians vs. Irish)
    • Many feared the erosion of their original “American” way of life
different periods of immigration6
Different Periods of Immigration
  • NOA Period (1925-1965)
    • Mostly Europeans from England, Italy, Germany
    • Reasons: World War II
different periods of immigration7
Different Periods of Immigration
  • Recent Immigration
    • Latin Americans (Mexicans crossing illegally over the border, etc.)
    • Caribbean Islands (Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic)
    • Asian (China, Philippines, Vietnam, South Korea, India, Pakistan
terms immigration
Terms - Immigration
  • Old Immigration: First wave of Europeans coming to the Americas (1700’s). Usually came from Northern and Western parts of Europe. Usually came with money. Came for a more independent life.
  • New Immigration: The second wave of Europeans coming to the United States (1800’s). Usually from Eastern or Southern Europe. Usually came poor – looking for opportunities.
terms
Terms
  • Nativists: Americans that rejected the new immigrants coming to America. They considered themselves the “true” Americans and did not like the new wave of “foreigners” and their different cultures.
  • Know Nothing Party: Also called the American Party, they opposed new immigrants in America. They feared the loss of jobs, and as mostly Protestants, they feared a Catholic influence and possible control of America by the Pope – and the loss of religious and political freedoms.
terms1
Terms
  • The Yellow Peril: A term used to describe the influx of Asian, especially Chinese, immigrants to the US. Also called the “yellow terror.”
  • Ellis Island: Island in New York Harbor where immigrants first arrived and registered.
terms2
Terms
  • The Melting Pot: A metaphor to describe the old belief that immigrants blended easily into the American culture – that the various cultures mixed to make a new cultural identity.
  • The Salad Bowl: A more accepted metaphor that describes how various cultural groups coexist in America, living together but retaining their original cultural identity.
terms3
Terms
  • Cultural Pluralism: A term that is in line with the “salad bowl” metaphor above. The idea that various cultural groups can exist within one larger cultural identity.
  • Refugee: A person who flees one nation for another in search of a more peaceful situation.
terms4
Terms
  • Assimilation: The process of blending in to the dominant society – in this case the process of becoming “Americanized.” Immigrants chose, or were sometimes forced, to learn English, accept new foods, and adapt to other cultural differences.
  • Naturalization: The formal process to become an American citizen.
essential questions1
Essential Questions
  • What are the significant differences between the periods of “Old Migration” and “New Migration” in America?
  • What is the main difference in the geographic origin of earlier immigrants and the more recent immigrants to the US?
  • Why might the term “salad bowl” be a more accurate metaphor than “melting pot” to describe the relationship between various ethic groups in America today?
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