Deep Learning and Digital Stewardship:  Discovery and Discernment in Christian Higher Education
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Deep Learning and Digital Stewardship: Discovery and Discernment in Christian Higher Education. Van Weigel [email protected] Three Questions Relating to Digital Stewardship. Are we using technology in a way that enhances the experience of learning for our students?

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Deep Learning and Digital Stewardship: Discovery and Discernment in Christian Higher Education

Van Weigel

[email protected]


Three questions relating to digital stewardship
Three Questions Relating to Digital Stewardship Discernment in Christian Higher Education

  • Are we using technology in a way that enhances the experience of learning for our students?

  • Are we using technology in a manner that makes good use of faculty time and energy?

  • What sorts of e-learning technologies can be sustained in a long-run environment of fiscal austerity?


These questions are a subset of other questions facing christian higher education
These Questions Are a Subset of Other Questions Facing Christian Higher Education

  • What is the proper mix between Internet-based and classroom-based instruction?

  • Will e-learning enhance or detract from the integration of faith and learning on Christian campuses?

  • Is distance education an effective alternative to face-to-face classroom interaction?

  • Can Christian perspectives on e-learning offer important new contributions to the field?


The first stewardship question

The First Stewardship Christian Higher Education Question:

Does Technology Really Enhance the Experience of Learning?


Current realms of transformation
Current Realms of Transformation Christian Higher Education

  • Student Services (e.g., online course registration)

  • E-mail and PowerPoint as ubiquitous e-learning technologies

    • Enhanced Communication?

    • Enhanced Learning or Better Lectures?

  • The transformation of the Internet into a “research library”

    • Google (1998)

    • Is the Internet a Border’s SuperStore (10%) or one-half of a Mall Bookstore (1%)? (Shapiro and Varian, Information Rules, 1999)

    • Upside: Digital journals and full-text databases

    • Downside: Information Overload


The loading dock approach
The Loading Dock Approach Christian Higher Education

  • The Loading Dock Model

    • Information is divided up into parcels and arranged neatly on pallets

    • The focus is on loading the cargo in the most efficient way possible (i.e., lectures)

    • Preoccupation with the logistics of weight distribution and pallet sequencing—not on how the cargo will be ultimately used

    • The loaded cargo is certified through quizzes and exams and students are presented with an official bill of lading (i.e., grade transcript)

  • To what extent are current CMS models and approaches to “web-enhancement” captive to this approach (e.g., posting the syllabus)?


Consequences of the loading dock approach
Consequences of the Loading Dock Approach Christian Higher Education

  • Little opportunity to develop problem-solving skills beyond trivial “textbook” problems

  • Focus on getting the answer right instead of how one arrived at the answer

  • Skills and knowledge acquired in one domain are rarely applied to other knowledge domains—inhibiting the development of metacognitive skills

  • Students become passive (and often bored) observers of “education” instead of active participants in the learning experience

  • Learning is construed as a process of acquiring and certifying knowledge, instead of a process involving discovery and discernment


The biology of memory
The Biology of Memory Christian Higher Education

  • Working and long-term memory involve separate pathways in the brain

  • Working memory is very limited in capacity (e.g. remembering names)

  • New ideas come about by manipulating information stored in working memory to create new relationships that are stored in long-term memory (i.e., thinking)

  • Learning involves the selection of synaptic pathways that are useful to us.


Four building blocks
Four Building Blocks Christian Higher Education

Knowledge Management

Cognitive Apprenticeship

The Knowledge Room

Work Group Paradigm


Cognitive apprenticeship
Cognitive Apprenticeship Christian Higher Education

  • Thinking is an Art

  • Focus on Helping Students to be Knowledge Creators and Integrators

  • Practice in the Presence of More Skilled Persons

  • The Importance of Learning from Peers (or Communities of Practice)


Communities of practice as a key stewardship concept
Communities of Practice as a Key Stewardship Concept Christian Higher Education

Preparing students for the 21st century workplace through building knowledge objects and gaining experience in “peer assists”


Methods of cognitive apprenticeship
Methods of Cognitive Apprenticeship Christian Higher Education


Five knowledge rooms www knowledgeroom com
Five Knowledge Rooms Christian Higher Education (www.knowledgeroom.com)

The Research Center

The Debate Hall

The Conference Center

The Portfolio

Gallery

The Skill Workplace


Two subsidiary stewardship concerns

Two Subsidiary Christian Higher EducationStewardship Concerns:

The CMS as a Pedagogical Straitjacket

The Problem of Commoditization


Commodization as a stewardship issue
Commodization as a Stewardship Issue Christian Higher Education

  • The broadband virtual classroom and the likely fate of narrow-band distance learning

  • “Like it or not, in the online environment, certain types of courses and programs become relative commodities. . . . Institutions in a particular geographic area that previously attracted local students on the strength of a given program or curriculum now face direct competition for that student from an institution that may be 3,000 or more miles away.”


Is the cms a pedagogical straitjacket
Is the CMS a Pedagogical Straitjacket? Christian Higher Education

  • The problem of lock-in

  • The predisposition to understanding learning as following a road map v. discovery-based learning (i.e., behaviorism v. constructivism)

  • The bias in favor of superficial assessment techniques (e.g., multiple choice v. solution narratives)

  • The inability of current CMS models to facilitate robust student-to-student collaboration on “ill-defined” questions.


E learning technologies should provide students with an out of the course experience
E-Learning Technologies Should Provide Students With An “Out of the Course” Experience

  • Learning as an interdisciplinary endeavor that spans several courses (v. segmented knowledge)

  • E-Portfolios as a necessary pedagogical tool

  • The assessment services of “community educators”


The second stewardship question

The Second Stewardship Question: “Out of the Course” Experience

Are we using technology in a manner that makes good use of faculty time and energy?


The time factor
The Time Factor “Out of the Course” Experience

  • Why should educators adopt a method of teaching that requires considerably higher time expenditures (estimates range from 20% to 250% more time expenditures)?

  • Two Key Variables

    • Class Size

    • Support Structures


The downside of class participation
The Downside of Class Participation “Out of the Course” Experience

  • A Class of 30 Students

    • A 50 minute lecture

    • 2 ½ minute commentary/response by each student

    • 1/3 of the students ask a question

    • The professor has 2 ½ minutes to respond

  • The Result? 50 minutes to 2 ½ hours


A Solution? “Out of the Course” Experience

  • Information technology as a tool for interactivity and connection (v. trading documents)

  • Information technology as a vehicle for profound decentralization (p2p v. client-server)


Go 2edsa wear blck
“Go 2EDSA, Wear blck” “Out of the Course” Experience


The use of im among college students
The Use of IM Among College Students “Out of the Course” Experience

The Pew Internet and American Life Project report, “The Internet Goes to College” (October 15, 2002), notes that that “College Internet users are twice as likely to use instant messaging on any given day compared to the average Internet user. On a typical day, 26% of college students use IM.” By contrast, only “12% of other Internet users are using IM on an average day.” The experience of connection has to be a central ingredient here—an experience more immediate and satisfying than trading e-mails or expressing opinions on a discussion board.


Empowering students to be educators

Teach to Learn “Out of the Course” Experience

Empowering Students to be Educators

  • Organization

  • Articulation

  • Reflection

  • Re-organization

It has been said that we retain 10% of what we read, 50% of what we see and hear, and 95% of what we teach.


Four key propositions of the teach to learn model
Four Key Propositions of the Teach-To-Learn Model “Out of the Course” Experience

  • Discovery and discernment are critical learning activities.

  • Collaborative learning flourishes on problem-based pedagogies that focus on studied ambiguity and degrees of difficulty—not divisions of labor.

  • Every presentation/lecture should have at least one informed respondent.

  • The ability to distinguish among levels of competency (through rubric-based assessment) is a principal learning outcome.


What the Groove Workspace has delivered . . . defines what Microsoft and Apple will be lucky to achieve by 2006.

InfoWorld, February 14, 2003

www.groove.net

Ray Ozzie


Core characteristics
Core Characteristics Microsoft and Apple will be lucky to achieve by 2006.

  • Profound decentralization with lightweight setup (modified p2p application)

  • A robust security structure (192-bit security with always on encryption)

  • Ability to co-edit documents, do web tours, and share PowerPoint presentations with no instructor bias

  • Online awareness

  • Microsoft Visual Studio as the IDE (Groove 2.5)

  • Integration with Microsoft’s SharePoint Server (Groove 2.5)

  • Cost ($25 per student; relay server is free)


A groove liability the computer center or a strength
A Groove Liability: Microsoft and Apple will be lucky to achieve by 2006.the computer center . . . or a strength?

The Wireless

Tablet PC with Next Generation Voice Recognition?


The third stewardship question

The Third Stewardship Microsoft and Apple will be lucky to achieve by 2006. Question:

What sorts of e-learning technologies can be sustained in a long run environment of fiscal austerity?


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