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Hospital Alliance Association Disaster Planning Conference March 6, 2012. - Flood Disasters - Impacts/Interdependencies Presenter: Sonny Fong, CDWR. CA Disaster Seasons. What type of major disaster seasons are there in CA each year? Fire (normally runs from June to October)

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Hospital alliance association disaster planning conference march 6 2012

Hospital Alliance AssociationDisaster Planning ConferenceMarch 6, 2012

- Flood Disasters -

Impacts/Interdependencies

Presenter: Sonny Fong, CDWR


Ca disaster seasons
CA Disaster Seasons

What type of major disaster seasons are there in CA each year?

  • Fire (normally runs from June to October)

  • Flood (official flood season is from October to April)

  • Earthquake (Year Around)


Critical infrastructure interdependencies and resilience
Critical Infrastructure – Interdependencies and Resilience

  • Pre 9/11/01 - CI included highways, roads, bridges, airports public transit, water supply facilities, wastewater treatment facilities, solid waste and hazardous waste services

  • Post 9/11/01 – CI list expanded to a total of 18 sectors to include agriculture and food systems, defense-industrial base, energy systems, public health & health care, national monuments and icons, banking and finance, drinking water systems, chemical facilities,commercial facilities, dams, emergency services, nuclear power, postal and shipping, transportation, telecommunications, info technology, critical manufacturing, and government facilities


How is ci interlinked
How is CI Interlinked?

  • Concept of “Lifeline System” developed to evaluate performance of large, geographically distributed networks during earthquakes, floods, other natural disasters and man-made events

  • Lifelines are grouped into six principal systems: electric power, gas and liquid fuels, telecommunications, transportation, waste disposalandwater supply


Ci interlink cont d
CI Interlink cont’d

  • Lifeline systems are interdependent – mostly by virtue of physical proximity and operational interaction

  • Lifeline systems in congested urban/suburban environments have higher risks due to potential failure impacts of the other systems – i.e. gas line failure with electrical and water lines above or below it

  • Lifeline systems all influence each other i.e. electric power systems supply energy for pumping stations, storage facilities, and SCADA for equipment control of distribution systems for oil, natural gas and chemicals

  • Over 86% of lifeline systems are owned and operated by private companies


System resiliency
System Resiliency

  • Resilience is defined as “the ability to bounce back or spring back into shape, position, etc. after being pressed or stretched.”

  • Examples of Resilience Qualities as related to technical elements:

    - Robustness (building codes, and construction

    procedures for new or retrofit work)

  • Redundancy (technical substitutions and “work around” capabilities)

  • Resource depth (availability of technical staff, equipment and materials for restoration and repair, resource allocation)

  • Timeliness (response time, system downtime, and restoration time)


Interesting fact
Interesting Fact

US counties with levees, which account for only 28% of all counties in the country and only 37% of the total US land area, are home to a whopping 55% of the US population. In 2004, a majority of Americans, over 156 million citizens, resided in these counties.



What are the primary influences leading to a levee failure
What Are The Primary Influences Leading to a Levee Failure?

Fast and high water flows (embankment erosion)

Wind-driven wave wash and high tidal influences specific to the Delta (both lead to over-topping)

Earthquakes (liquefaction and structural damage)

Substandard construction methods and materials (lack of compaction, poor fill materials)

Seepage and boils (loss of levee soils due to water piping)

* Burrowing animals

Intentional acts

* The next slide shows one of the types of animals



Although Officials will never know for sure, it’s suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water


Example of wind driven wave wash and high water levels
Example of Wind Driven Wave “Wash” and High Water Levels suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water


How a levee typically fails
How a Levee typically fails suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water


Flooded norcal area in 1955
Flooded NorCal Area in 1955 suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water


Aftermath
AFTERMATH suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water


Tragic Loss of Life suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water


What Would A Levee Failure In SACTO. suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Look Like??

This short video will tell the “STORY”


What Would the flood impacts to suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Sacramento be if a Flood Happens?

The next slides will give you a better

feel for what we’re in for.


Urban flood scenario

Urban suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of waterFloodScenario

SacramentoAreaLeveeBreaks

(Estimates as of 2005)


Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

What is the direct cost of a significant flood with levee overtopping and breaching in the Sacramento area?

What are the other impacts of a flood in the Sacramento area?


Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Hypothetical levee breach scenario

1.

Large regional flood (1 in 200 chance) with high flows in Sacramento River and American River

Sacramento River at I Street : near “Danger” stage

American River at H Street : exceeds “Danger” stage

Three levee breaches, each 300 ft in width:

American River breach near California State University

Sacramento River breach into Natomas

Sacramento River breach near Pocket area

2.

3.


Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Areas of inundation

  • Natomas

  • Downtown / Land

  • Park

  • Pocket area

  • River Park


Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Depths of flooding

Flooding depths

Inundated area

1 ft or more 100 square miles

6 ft or more 85 square miles

10 ft or more 67 square miles

15 ft or more 33 square miles

20 ft or more 6 square miles


Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Areas of deep flooding

Sacramento neighborhoods

  • Natomas

  • Downtown

  • Land Park

  • GreenHaven

  • Pocket

  • River Park


Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Population at risk

Depth of flooding

Population

0 to 1 ft

15,000 – 20,000 people

1 to 6 ft

69,000 – 80,000people

6 to 10 ft

39,000 – 45,000 people

10 to 20 ft

96,000 – 100,000 people

20 ft or greater

20,000 – 23,000 people

239,000 – 268,000 estimated people


Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Inundation of critical facilities

4 Hospitals, 2 have 1 ft or more

26 Medical/health facilities, 19 have 1 ft or more

193 Licensed care facilities, 176 have 1 ft or more

65 Schools, 59 have 1 ft or more


Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

Inundation of critical response facilities and lifeline utilities

  • 12 Fire stations, 9 have inundation depth of 4 ft or more

    • Significantly reduces service for emergency response such as fire suppression, search and rescue, and emergency medical response

  • 1 Police station, minor flooding

  • 38 Power substations, including 3 high voltage substations

  • Wastewater pump stations; likely many collection pipe breakages

  • 1 Water treatment plant; water not drinkable

  • 2 Airports; including 13 ft flooding of Sacramento Intl. Airport


  • Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Property damage

    Residential $9.2 billion

    Commercial $1.3 billion

    Industrial $0.5 billion

    Public buildings $0.2 billion

    Total $11.2 billion

    Category

    Damage

    Includes damage to structures, contents,

    vehicles, landscaping, and other property.

    (From USACE)


    Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Economic impacts

    Category

    Cost

    • Displacement (temporary housing and relocation) $ 1.5 billion

    • (average displacement time = 10 months, and

    • 230,000 residents displaced)

    • Lifeline utilities

      • Loss of electric power $ 188 per person per day

      • Loss of water (complete loss) $ 103 per person per day

      • (potability loss) $ 43 per person per day

      • Loss of wastewater (no treatment) $ 33 per person per day

      • (partial treatment) $ 8 per person per day

    • Cost to repair $ 24 million minimum


    Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Summary of direct cost for levee-breach scenario

    Cost

    Cost items

    Property damage $ 11.2 billion

    Displacement/temporary housing $ 1.5 billion

    Lifeline utility repairs $ 24 million

    Levee repair and pumping cost $ 58 million

    Emergency response and recovery $ 16 million

    $ 12.8 billion minimum

    Larger, deeper hypothetical floods would cause even greater damage and disruption to the Sacramento area


    Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Indirect fiscal impacts for levee-breach scenario

    • Displaced residents may not return

    • Loss of jobs and incomes

    • Loss of sales and property taxes

    • Reduction in gross regional product (all goods and services)

    • Long term impact to development patterns and economic activity

    • Emergency response and recovery

    Net indirect fiscal impacts up to $15 billion min.


    Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    What can we learn from the New Orleans flooding from Katrina?

    New Orleans

    Sacramento

    239,000 – 268,000

    Unknown

    Population flooded

    Fatalities

    547,000

    1,053


    Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Flood insurance policy holders

    In 2005, 50,000 parcels removed from 100-year regulated floodplain in Sacramento.

    Much of Sacramento now qualifies for less expensive flood insurance.

    Current policies

    *2005 est

    Area

    City of Sacramento 45,228

    County of Sacramento 14,423


    Urban Flood Scenario: Sacramento Area levee break suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Sources of information

    Results reported are based on information developed for and supplied by:

    Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    California Department of Water Resources

    City and County of Sacramento

    Sacramento Municipal Utility District

    Information provided was developed for flood defense infrastructure planning and design.


    What are flood impacts to the delta
    What Are Flood Impacts To The Delta? suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Should an earthquake occur which causes the failure of the levees for the Eight Key Western Delta Islands it’s anticipated that salt water intrusion would occur which would lead to the shutdown of the State Water Project (SWP) and the Central Valley Project (CVP). The saltwater intrusion impacts would be for a long period of time (a year or more)

    - CVP provides source water for approximately 1.8 Million acres of farmland through the Central Valley

    - SWP provides source water for approximately 650,000 acres of farmland throughout the state and for over 25 Million people

    - SWP is the State’s 5th largest electric power generator

    - Both SWP and CVP are components of the Flood Control System

    - Significant impacts to State and National Economies

    - agriculture, power, manufacturing, tourism, environmental, water quality, recreation, transportation, quality of life .……………

    It should be noted that flood impacts of most Delta Islands/regions would be similar to those of an urban area however at a varying and lesser degree.


    Sherman island
    Sherman Island suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Location

    Western most tract of the

    57 tracts or islands in the Sacramento Delta

    Meeting point of Sacramento, Solano, and Contra Costa Counties

    At the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, near the mouth of the Sacramento and also bordered by Three Mile Slough


    Sherman Island suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Early History

    1855: First settled

    1869: Dikes built, the first island

    to be carved out of the peat zone

    1869: Substantial levees built on the island by Chinese laborers

    Early 1870’s: Sherman Island flooded annually

    1874: Reclamation and preservation costs for Sherman Island’s levees totaled $500,000 ($6.2 million today)

    1875: Levee last breached and it was decided not to reclaim the land, creating Lower Sherman Island Lake

    Property sold to the State of California for one dollar. Today the area is owned by the California Department of Fish and Game as a game preserve to guarantee hunting access to the public


    Sherman island1
    Sherman Island suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Ownership Today

    Much of the land is owned by DWR and leased for agriculture (2002: DWR owns 8,146 of 9,183 acres)

    Sherman Lake is managed as a State Waterfowl Area

    Sacramento County Park (including boat launch) located on Island and open year round


    Sherman island2
    Sherman Island suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    Infrastructural Role

    Protects water export facilities in the Southern Delta from saltwater intrusion by displacing water and maintaining the salinity balance

    State Hwy 160

    Three major power lines

    Underground gas fields


    Comparison of repairs of major levee breaks in delta
    Comparison of Repairs of suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of waterMajor Levee Breaks in Delta

    Brannan-Andrus Levee Maintenance District, Levee Break: June 21, 1972

    • National Disaster declared June 27, and Breach closed July 26

    • Estimated total damages 1981 dollars: $91 million

    • US Army Corps repaired break,

    • 35% of City of Isleton was inundated

    Webb Tract, RD 2026, Levee Break: Jan.18, 1980

    • 850 feet wide, 60 feet deep

    • US Army Corps repaired break Approximately $12 million

    • 4 month delay in breach repair

    • Corps first repaired Holland Tract due to availability of equipment, materials

    • Sustained extensive landside erosion damage; Corps rocked inside

    Holland Tract-RD 2025, Levee Break: Jan. 18, 1980

    (about 1 hour after Webb)

    • 250 feet wide, 40 feet deep

    • US Army Corps repaired break Approximately $8 million


    Lower Jones Tract-RD 2038, Levee Break Sept. 26, 1980 suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    • 275 feet wide, 55 feet deep

    • Reclamation District managed Levee Break contract, paid with warrants

    • Breach repaired prior to AT & SF railroad embankment failure

    • Fearing flood surge Trapper Slough was raised by US Army Corp

    • Total estimated costs to RD, SJ County, EBMUD and DWR: $5.6 million

    • Corps costs estimated $700,000

    McDonald Island- RD 2030, Levee Break August 23, 1982,

    Governor’s Disaster August 25,1982

    • 600 feet wide, 40-85 feet in depth

    • Approximately $13 million in total levee damages

    • RD instigated repairs immediately, Contract with Dutra, paid with warrants

    • FEMA Disaster declared on Sept. 24, 1982

    • Breach 90 % complete in last week of September


    Venice Island-RD 2023, Levee Break Nov. 30, 1982, suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    during highest tide since 1955

    • 500 feet wide, 40 feet deep

    • Approximately $ 9 million in total levee damages

    • DWR sent inspectors on 12/1/82 State Disaster Assistance was initiated

    • Corps performed limited PL-84-99

    • District signed emergency repair contract with Dutra on 12/8/82

    • District paid for repairs using warrants

    • FEMA disaster declared 2/22/83 and was backdated to Nov 1982

    • As of 12/30 the break repair was 90% complete

    Mildred Island, RD 2021, Levee Break Jan 27,1983,

    1000 Acres Not Reclaimed

    • Corps of Engineers under PL-84-99 rocked inside levee to protect adjoining islands

    • FEMA approved request to help repair after approx. one month

    • District let island stay flooded; chose not come up estimated $250,000 share of costs


    Bradford Island-RD 2059, Levee Break: December 3,1983 suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    • 600 feet wide, 40-50 feet deep

    • State Disaster declared December 9, 1983, NO federal disaster declaration

    • District paid repairs with warrants

    • Approximately 84% of rock placed in break by Feb 29, 1984

    New Hope Tract, February 20 1986

    • 170 feet wide levee break, repaired at approximately $900,000

    • Finished placing rock in break on March 20, 1986

    • RD paid for levee work with warrants, FEMA Disaster declared Feb 21, 1986

    Tyler Island- RD 563, 1986 Levee Break, February 19 1986,

    Two levee breaks in same general area

    • RD paid for levee work with warrants, FEMA Disaster declared 2/21/86

    • 2 levee breaks approximately, each about 300’ in length; began repairs immediately

    • Approximate cost to repair both breaks: $3 million 1996-97 Flood - Project levees on San Joaquin River System - Corps of Engineers repaired under Public Law 84-99


    1996-97 Flood suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water

    • Project levees on San Joaquin River Sys.

    • Corps of Engineers repaired under Public Law 84-99

    Upper Jones Tract Levee Break, June 5, 2004

    • Levee breach was approximately 300’ wide

    • 12,000 square acres of mostly agricultural land flooded to depth of 12' average

    • Repair of breach took over 5 weeks of 24x7 emergency construction work

    • Dewatering of Island took over 45 days of continuous around-the-clock pumping

    • Emergency breach repair and dewatering cost to State in excess of $30 Million

    • Threatened infrastructures included a railroad, source water supply for the South Bay, liquid fuel supply for airport and interior levees protecting major transportation routes and urban areas


    Flood Control Projects and Agencies suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water


    Final questions
    Final Questions? suspected that a burrowing animal caused the failure of Jones Tract Levee in 2004 which put 12,000 square acres under 8’-12’ of water


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