Self determination cross cultural implications for social work
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Self-Determination: Cross-Cultural Implications for Social Work. Heather Sandala University of North Carolina Wilmington. Self-Determination:. Recognized by the social work profession as the “right and need of clients to freedom in making their own choices and decisions” (Hollis, 1967).

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Self-Determination: Cross-Cultural Implications for Social Work

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Self determination cross cultural implications for social work

Self-Determination: Cross-Cultural Implications for Social Work

Heather Sandala

University of North Carolina Wilmington


Self determination

Self-Determination:

  • Recognized by the social work profession as the “right and need of clients to freedom in making their own choices and decisions” (Hollis, 1967).

  • Includes the determination of everything, from trivial to crucial choices.


Importance to the social work profession

Importance to the Social Work Profession:

  • Component of social work’s fundamental values and principles.

  • Common base as the framework with which social work practitioners operate amongst various diverse client populations.

  • This ability for adults to be capable of making personal choices is viewed as essential to functioning.


International social work

International Social Work:

  • Impact of globalization

  • Western-educated social workers practicing abroad

  • Current social work values and ethical codes are too grounded in Western-oriented individualistic values


Western ideals

Western Ideals

  • Not congruent with communal-focused cultures

  • Controversial


Case findings

Case Findings

  • Africa

    • Problematic, role-stratified culture, groupness and commonality

  • India

    • Religious implications, fate

  • Denmark

    • Responsibility to society and welfare for all


Objectives

Objectives

  • Add to current ideals of “cultural competence”:

    • “sensitivity and awareness of cultural implications and influences in all aspects of [social] work with clients” (DuBois and Miley, 2005).


Objectives1

Objectives

  • Deeper understanding of a population’s values

  • Inform and educate potential international social workers

  • Better understanding of conflict between Western market societies which value individualism and self-determination, and traditional societies which value communal identity

  • International viability


Methods

Methods

  • Measurable survey utilizing vignettes

  • Vignettes modeled after social worker and client scenario

    • Involves both client's own self-determination and the role of the social worker in providing opinions and advice.


Methods1

Methods

  • Designed to measure student’s level of individualism in relation to the concept of self-determination

  • Provide basis for each respondent to get a score for this concept

  • Respondents will be classified according to the cultural group to which they belong

  • Set of hypotheses will be constructed to examine whether individual scores vary with cultural groups.

  • A comparative study will enable measurement of one’s level of self-determination versus communal ideals


Subjects

Subjects

  • Various social work students:

    • University of North Carolina Wilmington and similar programs would serve as base line

    • Rosebud, South Dakota; rural West Virginia

    • International communities South Africa, Eastern countries, Eastern Europe


Final project

Final Project

  • Report that details the survey’s findings

  • These results will be coupled with extensive research of existing findings about the cultural ideals of self-determination


Expected outcome

Expected Outcome

  • Measurement of the current degree of commitment to self-determination among social work students will enable insight to various dimensions.


Bibliography

Bibliography

DuBois, B. & Miley, K.K. (2002). Social work: An empowering profession (4th ed.).Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Hollis, F. (1967). Principles and assumptions underlying case work principles. In E. Younghusband (Ed.), Social work and social values (p. 22-38). London: George Allan &

Unwin Ltd.


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