Caesar s english vocabulary from latin lesson ii
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CAESAR’S ENGLISH VOCABULARY FROM LATIN, Lesson II. VOCABULARY FROM LATIN, Lesson II Word definition placate to appease derision ridicule vivacious full of life procure to acquire retort a quick, clever reply.

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Caesar s english vocabulary from latin lesson ii
CAESAR’S ENGLISHVOCABULARY FROM LATIN, Lesson II


VOCABULARY FROM LATIN, Lesson II

Worddefinition

placate to appease

derision ridicule

vivacious full of life

procure to acquire

retort a quick, clever reply


placate (PLAY-kate) v. - to appeaseThe English verb placate comes from the Latin placare; to placate is to appease, to pacify someone’s anger or resentment. Someone whose anger can not be placated is implacable. In her 1938 classic The Yearling, Marjorie Rawlings wrote that “He had never seen his father so cold and implacable.”In Spanish, placate is aplacar.


derision (de-RIZH-un) n. - ridiculeDerision comes from the Latin derisus; and is scorn, mockery, ridicule. It is laughing (ris) down (de) at someone. William Golding, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature, wrote in Lord of the Flies that the “sniggering of the savages became a loud derisive jeer.”In Spanish, derision is irision.


vivacious (vie-VAY-shuss) adj. – full of lifeThe adjective vivacious (the noun form is vivacity) comes from the Latin word vivax, and refers to someone who is full (ous) of life (viv). In fact, sometimes people are so vivacious that they try your nerves! Daniel Dafoe used vivacious in Robinson Crusoe to describe “a great vivacity and sparkling sharpness in his eyes.” What do you think he meant by that?In Spanish, vivacious is vivaz.


procure (pro-KYURE) v. – to acquireThe English verb procure comes from the Latin word procurare, to take care of. To procure is to acquire. In H.G. Well’s 1897 classic, The Invisible Man, the invisible man says that “My idea was to procure clothing.” In 1604 Christopher Marlowe wrote, in Doctor Faustus, that “I have procured your pardons.” How would you procure someone’s pardon?In Spanish, procure is procurar.


retort (ree-TORT) n. or v. – quick, clever replyThe English word retort,from the Latin retortus, can be a noun or a verb; it means a swift and clever reply that is twisted (tort) back (re) on someone. Someone else has to have spoke first, then we retort. Elizabeth Montgomery wrote, in her 1908 classic Anne of Green Gables, that the “retort silenced Matthew if it did not convince him.” What is happening in Elizabeth Montgomery’s example?In Spanish, retort is retorta.


VOCABULARY FROM LATIN, Lesson II

Worddefinition

placate to appease

derision ridicule

vivacious full of life

procure to acquire

retort a quick, clever reply


Caesar s classic words challenge
Caesar’s Classic Words Challenge

  • From Bram Stoker’s Dracula

    Tell me of the house which you have ________ for me.

    a. placated

    b. procured

    c. retorted

    d. derided


  • From Bram Stoker’s Dracula

    Tell me of the house which you have ________ for me.

    a. placated

    b. procured

    c. retorted

    d. derided


2. From John Knowles’ A Separate Peace

“The winter loves me,” he _________.

a. advocated

b. procured

c. placated

d. retorted


2. From John Knowles’ A Separate Peace

“The winter loves me,” he _________.

a. advocated

b. procured

c. placated

d. retorted


3. From Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon

It was a drama of wronged ladies and _______ hates.

a. implacable

b. vivacious

c. retorted

d. derisive


3. From Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon

It was a drama of wronged ladies and _______ hates.

a. implacable

b. vivacious

c. retorted

d. derisive


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