Jana behm math 320 july 7 2010
Download
1 / 13

Math and politics A look at how math affects elections - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 102 Views
  • Uploaded on

Jana Behm Math 320 July 7, 2010. Math and politics A look at how math affects elections. Voting Systems and how they can effect outcomes *Majority Rule *Plurality Voting *Electoral College. overview. *Straight forward *Excellent for choosing between 2 candidates *Most votes wins

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Math and politics A look at how math affects elections' - bazyli


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Jana behm math 320 july 7 2010

Jana Behm

Math 320

July 7, 2010

Math and politicsA look at how math affects elections


Overview

overview


Majority rule

*Straight forward

*Excellent for choosing between 2 candidates

*Most votes wins

*No single vote counts more than any other

*Potential problem: TIES (usually broken in some pre-arranged way)

*Another potential problem: difficult in a multi-party system

Majority Rule


Plurality voting

*More than 2 alternatives in an election

*Simply count the number of 1st place votes

*Possible that no candidate has the majority of the votes cast

Plurality Voting


The math of majority and plurality voting

*Majority voting: simple majority

>Votes cast: 100 with 2 candidates– winner needs a simple majority which is (100/2) +1 or 51 votes to win the election.

*Plurality voting: simple math

>Votes cast: 100 with 3 candidates – winner simply needs the most votes, not necessarily a majority of the votes cast.

The math of Majority and plurality voting


The math of majority and plurality voting1

Example: 1992 US Presidential Election

Total Votes Clinton Bush Perot

104,425,014 44,909,326 39,103,882 19,741,657

43.01% 37.45% 18.91%

Therefore Clinton was the winner, but did not receive the majority of the votes cast

Source: http://iun.edu/~mathiho/mathpol/fall00/chapter11.htm

The math of Majority and plurality voting


U s electoral college

*Each state is given an electoral numbers which equals the number of US representatives + the 2 senators that they have

*How are the representatives divided?

*Is this fair?

*2009 estimates US population to be 307,006,550 people

U.s. electoral college


U s electoral college continued

State Population % of US pop Electoral votes % of electoral votes

MT 974989 0.32% 3 0.56%

IA 3007856 0.98% 7 1.30%

IL 12910409 4.21% 21 3.90%

FL 18537659 6.04% 27 5.02%

NY 19541453 6.37% 31 5.76%

TX 24782302 8.07% 34 6.32%

CA 36961664 12.04% 55 10.22%

US Population = 307,006,550 Electoral votes possible: 538

Source for population numbers: http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/17000.html

U.S. electoral college continued


Winning an election but losing the popular vote

2000 Presidential Election electoral votes

Candidate Popular Vote % Electoral Vote %

George W. Bush 50,460,110 47.87% 271 50.4%

Albert Gore Jr. 51,003,926 48.38% 266 49.4%

Neither candidate had a simple majority as there were 6 candidates on the ballot.

Plurality voting is not in effect in the United States

President Bush won 2 large electoral states, but MANY of the smaller states that added up for the electoral win

Mr. Gore won largely populated states, but not enough of them for electoral victory.

Source: http://www.uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/national.php?f=0&year=2000

Winning an election but losing the popular vote


2000 electoral map
2000 electoral map electoral votes


Electoral math

There are 538 electoral votes possible electoral votes

Candidates must get a simple majority

538/2 +1 = 270 votes

Therefore, they can have a simple majority of electoral votes without having a majority of votes cast in an election or even the most votes cast.

Electoral Math


Let s play with the math

http:// electoral voteswww.archives.gov/federal-register/electoral-college/calculator.html

http://www.realclearpolitics.com/epolls/maps/obama_vs_mccain/?map=1

Let’s play with the math


Conclusion

Does math effect election outcomes? electoral votes

Can one state change the entire course of an election with as little as 3 electoral votes?

How many configurations of states will give you the 270 needed to win? Are the big states mandatory, or do they just make it easier?

conclusion


ad