Marzano s Essential 9 High Leverage Instructional Strategies
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Marzano s Essential 9 High Leverage Instructional Strategies

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Objectives. By the end of the session you will...examine research-based instructional strategies that affect student achievementidentify various methods for teaching these strategiesdetermine which strategies you will incorporate in your classroom practice. . Research. Robert Marzano, Debra Picke
Marzano s Essential 9 High Leverage Instructional Strategies

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1. Marzano?s Essential 9 High Leverage Instructional Strategies

2. Objectives By the end of the session you will... examine research-based instructional strategies that affect student achievement identify various methods for teaching these strategies determine which strategies you will incorporate in your classroom practice.

3. Research Robert Marzano, Debra Pickering, Jane Pollock From books, Classroom Instruction That Works & The Handbook for Classroom Instruction that Works Identified nine instructional strategies that are most likely to improve student achievement across all content areas and across all grade levels

4. Clock Buddies

5. The Essential Nine Categories Of Instructional Strategies That Affect Student Achievement

6. Similarities and Differences Research The ability to break a concept into its similar and dissimilar characteristics allows students to understand (and often solve) complex problems by analyzing them in a more simple way.

7. Synectics Find your 4:00 partner. Find another pair, finish the following statement. Going back to school after Winter vacation is like ______________ because _________________ .

8. Identifying Similarities and Differences Variety of Ways -Comparing similarities and differences -Classifying grouping things that are alike -Metaphors comparing two unlike things -Analogies identifying relationships between pairs of concepts

9. Identifying Similarities and Differences Recommendations For Classroom Practice Give students a model for the process. Use familiar content to teach steps. Give students graphic organizers. Guide students as needed.

10. Summarizing and Note Taking Research High leverage strategies because they: - encourage powerful learning - lead to deeper understanding - endure long-term recall Verbatim note taking is the least effective way to take notes.

11. Summarizing Recommendations for Classroom Practice Use summary frames Use a rule-based summary strategy (a set of rules students can follow to summarize text)

12. Summarizing Use the Triad Summarizing format to summarize the article ?Moving With the Brain in Mind? Large Group Share

13. Note Taking Research Note taking and summarizing are closely related. Both require students to identify what is most important about the knowledge they are learning and then state that knowledge in their own words.

14. Note Taking Recommendations For Classroom Practice Teach students a variety of note- taking formats. Give students teacher-prepared notes. Remind students to review their notes.

15. Note Taking Although note taking is one of the most useful study skills a student can cultivate, often teachers do not explicitly teach note taking strategies in the classroom.

16. Note Taking Cornell Notes Find your 10:00 partner and share. What elements of the Cornell note format make this type of note taking effective for students? How could this format be adapted for use with younger students?

17. Reinforcing Effort

18. Reflecting on Current Beliefs and Practices Think, Pair, Share - Turn to your neighbor and discuss? How do you reinforce students? effort in your classroom? What is the purpose for reinforcing effort in the classroom? What makes reinforcing effort effective or ineffective? What questions do you have about reinforcing effort?

19. RESEARCH People generally attribute success at any given task to one of four causes:

20. Generalizations from Research

22. Recommendations for Classroom Practice

23. Recommendations for Classroom Practice

24. Reinforcing Effort Students know what is expected. Fair and credible evaluations are used. Curriculum is geared to standards. Student responsibility for work is emphasized. Results are fixed, time varies. Recognition of accomplishment is utilized.

25. Providing Recognition

26. RESEARCH

28. CHECKING FOR UNDERSTANDING

32. The Essential Nine Categories Of Instructional Strategies That Affect Student Achievement

33. Homework Rationale Why homework? - Students are in school a short time - Homework extends learning beyond the school day Asset or Liability? - It depends on how it is used

34. Homework Take 3-4 minutes to answer these questions on the handout provided. What are the purposes of homework? What kind of homework do you assign your students? What makes homework effective, and how do you know it has been? What questions do you have about using homework? Find your 2:00 partner and share

35. Homework and Practice Research Both homework and practice give students opportunities to deepen their understanding and proficiency with content they are learning.

36. Homework Considerations/Recommendations -Amount 10 X the # of the grade as a guideline -Parent involvement Parents as facilitators -Homework policy Feasible & defensible expectations -Purpose Without one, it?s ?busy work? -Assignment sheets Clarify what they are doing and why -Feedback (be specific) Can improve student achievement

37. Practice Research Students need to practice skills and processes before they can use them effectively. Goal is for learning a skill, not learning information.

38. Practice Recommendations For Classroom Practice Determine which skills are worth practicing. Schedule massed and distributed practice. Help students shape a skill or process (explicit instruction and modeling)

39. Non Linguistic Representations Research -Teachers typically present new knowledge to students linguistically. -Engaging students in the creation of nonlinguistic representation actually stimulates and increases activity in the brain.

40. Non Linguistic Representations Recommendations For Classroom Practice Graphic organizers Pictographic representations Mental images Physical models

41. Graphic Organizers Use Graphic Organizers to: Activate current knowledge Present information Take notes Summarize information Assess student learning

42. Graphic Organizers Graphic organizers make thinking visible. Different graphic organizers represent different kinds of thinking. Students must be taught how to use graphic organizers. The goal is for students to be able to select the appropriate graphic organizer.

43. Graphic Organizers Give One?Get One Take two post-it notes, on each one, write one way that you have used graphic organizers in your classroom. Share and exchange ideas with other participants.

44. Cooperative Learning Research Organizing students into cooperative groups yields a positive effect on overall learning if approach is systematic and consistent.

45. Cooperative Learning Recommendations For Classroom Use Teach students the elements of cooperative learning Vary grouping criteria (informal, formal and base) Manage group size (3-5 students)

46. Cooperative Learning Pair Square Locate your Louvre Museum partner, find another team. What activity did we do today that is an example of cooperative learning? What are some ways you group students other than skill level?

47. The Essential Nine

48. Setting Objectives and Providing Feedback Research Students learn more efficiently when they know the goals and objectives of a specific lesson or learning activity.

49. Setting Objectives What do students need to know and be able to do? How do I know they got it? What do I do when they don?t? What do I do when they do?

50. Setting Objectives Mastery Objectives Language Objectives Written in Kid-Friendly Language

51. Setting Objectives Recommendations For Classroom Practice Set ?standards-based? goals for a unit and encourage students to set personal learning goals on how they?ll achieve them. Communicate learning objectives to parents so they can provide appropriate support to students.

52. Setting Personal Learning Goals GOAL: To become a better writer MORE CONCRETE: I want to write more effective introductions with clear, concise thesis statements. I want to use good paragraph form in my writing.

53. Providing Feedback Recommendations For Classroom Practice Use various methods of assessment. Feedback should be corrective in nature. Give timely feedback. Feedback should be specific to criterion. Self-assessment tools may be used to gauge progress.

54. Providing Feedback ?Academic feedback is more strongly and consistently related to achievement than any other teaching behavior. This relationship is consistent regardless of grade, socioeconomic status, race or school setting.? Bellon, Jerry J. Teaching from a Research Knowledge Base. 1992

55. Providing Feedback Find your Anagram Partner and share. Why are rubrics an excellent way to give students specific feedback?

56. Generating and Testing Hypotheses Research Generating and testing hypotheses involves the application of knowledge, which enhances learning.

57. Generating and Testing Hypotheses Examples of Strategies Systems Analysis Problem Solving Historical Investigation Invention Experimental Inquiry Decision Making

58. Generating and Testing Hypotheses Recommendations For Classroom Practice Give students a model for the strategy Use familiar content to teach the strategy Make graphic organizers available Provide guided practice Have students explain their hypotheses and conclusions

59. Cues, Questions, and Advance Organizers Research Cues Explicit reminders about what a student is about to experience Questions Help students analyze what they already know Advance Organizers Help students retrieve what they know about a topic and focus on the new information

60. Cues, Questions, and Advance Organizers Recommendations For Classroom Practice Cues Telling students the topic of an article they are about to read Reminding students to look for new information when reading

61. Cues, Questions, and Advance Organizers Recommendations For Classroom Practice Questions Higher-level questions require students to analyze information and apply what they know

62. Cues, Questions, and Advance Organizers Research shows that? 1/3 of class interactions are questions Primary grades: 150 per hour Elementary/high: several hundred per day (Gage/Berliner)

63. Cues, Questions, and Advance Organizers Research shows that? (Flanders) RULE OF 2/3 2/3 of class time is verbal 2/3 of that time is questions 2/3 are asked by teacher 2/3 are answered by teacher

64. Advance Organizers Advance organizers are organizational frameworks teachers present to students prior to teaching new content to prepare them for what they are about to learn. Advance organizers focus on essential information and get students ready to use the information.

65. Advance Organizers Recommendations For Classroom Practice SQRRR (survey, question, read, recite, review) Narrative advance organizers (tell a story to make personal connections) Expository Skim a text Use graphic organizers

66. Advance Organizers Find your Merovingian King partner and share: Review SQ3R method. What are some ways you could implement this in your classroom?

67. Review of Objectives examine research-based instructional strategies that affect student achievement identify various methods for teaching these strategies determine which strategies you will incorporate in your classroom practice.

68. Shaping Up Review


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