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4: Sentence Types. This chapter will help you understand and identify some of the various types of sentences. Chapter Outline . Sentence Types: The Simple Sentence The Compound Sentence The Complex Sentence. The Simple Sentence.

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4 sentence types

4: Sentence Types

This chapter will help you understand and identify some of the various types of sentences.


Chapter outline
Chapter Outline 

  • Sentence Types:

  • The Simple Sentence

  • The Compound Sentence

  • The Complex Sentence


The simple sentence
The Simple Sentence

  • A simple sentence  has only one subject-verb combination and expresses a complete thought.

    For example:

  • Children play.

  • Joeruns.

  • The dogate my homework.


A simple sentence can have more than one subject, more than one verb, or several subjects and verbs.

  • A simple sentence may have more than one subject:

    Lemons and limes taste sharp and tangy.


A simple sentence can have more than one subject, more than one verb, or several subjects and verbs.

  • A simple sentence may have more than one verb:

    The puppies nipped and nuzzled one another playfully.


A simple sentence can have more than one subject, more than one verb, or several subjects and verbs.

  • A simple sentence may even have several subjects and verbs:

    Every New Year’s Eve, my parents, aunts, and uncles eat, dance, and welcome the new year together.


The compound sentence
THE COMPOUND SENTENCE

  • A compound sentence is made up of two or more simple sentences. Usually, the two complete statements are connected by a commaand a joining word.

    For example:

    The dogate my homework, so Iam in trouble.

    Jojowas in Canada, and Loretta wasin US.


  • Supper is ready.

  • The guests have not arrived.

    These two simple sentences can be combined to form one compound sentence:

  • Supper is ready, but the guests have not arrived.

  • The process of joining two ideas of equal importance is known as coordination.

  • Put a comma plus a joining word (also known as a coordinating conjunction), such as and, but, or so, between the two complete thoughts.


  • The cover is torn off this book, and the last few pages are missing.

    (And means in addition: The cover is torn off this book; in addition, the last few pages are missing.)


  • The kittens are darling, but we can’t have another pet.

    But means however: The kittens are darling; however, we can’t have another pet.)


  • Kendra has to get up early tomorrow, so she isn’t going to the party tonight.

    (So means as a result: Kendra has to get up early tomorrow; as a result, she isn’t going to the party tonight.)


Complex sentence
Complex sentence

  • A complex sentence is made of a complete simple sentence and a statement that begins with a dependent word (such as:although, before, that, which.)

    For example:

  • The dogate my homework, although I told him not to.

  • Jojowas in Tuscon, which is very strange.


  • If it thunders, our dog hides under the bed.

  • Each thought could stand alone as an independent statement. A complex sentence, on the other hand, includes one independent statement and at least one dependent statement, which cannot stand alone.


If it thunders, our dog hides under the bed.

  • Dependent statements begin with dependent words (also known as subordinating conjunctions), such as after, although, as, because, when, and while.

  • A dependent statement also includes a subject and a verb.

  • Punctuation note: Put a comma at the end of a dependent statement that begins a sentence, as in the example above.


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