Working in teams a brief introduction
Download
1 / 11

Working in Teams A Brief Introduction - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 93 Views
  • Uploaded on

Working in Teams A Brief Introduction. The Cain Project in Engineering and Professional Communication ENGINEERING SERIES. Why Learn Team Skills? . Sample of Job Qualifications That Employers Requested : “Ability to work effectively in a multi-disciplinary team setting”

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Working in Teams A Brief Introduction' - banyan


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Working in teams a brief introduction

Working in TeamsA Brief Introduction

The Cain Project in Engineering and Professional Communication

ENGINEERING SERIES


Why learn team skills
Why Learn Team Skills?

Sample of Job Qualifications That Employers Requested:

  • “Ability to work effectively in a multi-disciplinary team setting”

  • “Ability to work with moderate supervision on multidisciplinary teams is desired”

  • “Possess good communication (oral and written) skills and be able to work well in a team environment”

  • “Must be a team player”


Why work in a team

97

Why Work in a Team?

Teams outperform their best member what ___% of the time?

Especially if members are:

  • competent

  • motivated

  • diverse

  • trained

    Michaelsen, L.K., Watson, W. E., & Black, R. H. (1989)


What is a team
What Is a Team?

A diverse group of people who:

  • share leadership responsibilities

  • work towards a mutually defined goal

  • are interdependent

  • work within larger group or system

  • have created an identity


A successful team

Team Goals

Member

Member

Member

Task Functions

Maintenance Functions

A Successful Team

  • Accomplishes team goals

  • Balances task and maintenance functions through effective communication

Lumdsen, G, & Lumdsen, D (1993)


Team s task and maintenance functions
Team’s Task and Maintenance Functions

Task Functions

  • Accomplish the task (giving or seeking info, evaluating, elaborating, etc.)

    Maintenance Functions

  • Build relationships between members (establishing norms, gatekeeping, supporting, etc.)


Resolve maintenance problems
Resolve Maintenance Problems

  • Don’t try to solve difficulties in the way your group performs (maintains relationships) by altering the way you do your task.

  • Don’t think, “I’ll show him how it feels to get things at the last minute. I’ll just wait to deliver my portion of the report until 2 hours before we have to hand it in!”

  • Do say, “Armand, we need to talk about delivering things to one another. Let’s set aside about 20 minutes on the agenda before we go on to other issues.”


What tips the balance between average and excellent

Makes decisions collectively

Collaborates; no power hoarding

Appreciates debate or differences

Balances participation

Stays focused on goals

Engages in open communication

Supports one another

Creates strong team spirit

What Tips the Balance Between Average and Excellent?

Adapted from: Lewis, P., Aldridge, D., & Swamidass, P. (1998)


Good engineering teams
Good Engineering Teams

  • Make sure everyone knows the task/goal

  • Plan realistically

  • Make sure roles and norms are understood

  • Help each other meet group goals


References
References

  • Michaelsen, L.K., Watson, W. E., & Black, R. H. A realistic test of individual versus group consensus decision making. Journal of Applied Psychology, 74(5): 834-839.

  • Lewis, P., Aldridge, D., & Swamidass, P. M. (1998) Assessing teaming skills acquisition on undergraduate project teams, Journal of Engineering Education, 82, pp 149-155.

  • Lumdsen, G, & Lumdsen, D. Communicating in Groups and Teams: Sharing Leadership, 4th ed.Wadsworth Publishing (2003).


Lead through Excellence in Engineering Communication

  • More resources are available for you

  • under “Engineering Communication” at Connexions at http://cnx.org

  • at the Cain Project site at http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/~cainproj

  • in your course Communication Folder in OWLSPACE.


ad