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A REVOLUTION IN CIRCUIT BREAKER OPERATING MECHANISM TECHNOLOGY CARILEC 2002. 22 - 26 July 2002 Jamaica Kenneth Jabrand. Function. Why do we have Circuit Breakers?.

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22 26 july 2002 jamaica kenneth jabrand l.jpg

A REVOLUTION IN CIRCUIT BREAKER OPERATING MECHANISM TECHNOLOGY CARILEC 2002

22 - 26 July 2002

Jamaica

Kenneth Jabrand


Why do we have circuit breakers l.jpg

Function

Why do we have Circuit Breakers?

  • To switch transmission lines, transformers, cables, busbars etc.

  • Frequent switching of capacitor banks and reactor banks

  • To open an electrical circuit

  • To close/reclose an open circuit

  • And of course the most important to clear a fault to protect equipment and human life!


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Technology

Circuit Breaker Development

…the seventies & the eighties

…the eighties & the nineties

…the sixties

Air Blast

Oil Minimum

SF6 Gas


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Technology

Operating Energy

’85

Arc Assisted

(Single Motion)

’94

Arc Assisted

(Double Motion)

Arc Assisted

(Triple Motion)

’98

Interrupter Complexity

Interrupter Technology Trends

’80’s

  • Focus on reduction of operating energy required

Puffer

  • Goal achieved with single motion interrupters

  • Trend toward multi-motion, arc assisted interrupters by some manufacturers

    • Trade off of energy reduction forHIGHLY complex interrupter


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Technology

Reliability

’20’s on

Pneumatic

’50’s on

’90’s

Hydraulic

Spring

Mechanism Complexity

Operating Mechanism Technology Trends

’10’s on

  • Spring operating mechanisms employed since the 1930’s

Spring

  • Some manufacturers traditionally focused on pneumatic or hydraulic operating mechanisms

  • Current manufacturer trend towards spring operating mechanisms


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New solutions

Trend for 2000 and Beyond

  • Continue use of simple, robust single motion interrupters

  • Continued improvement of operating mechanisms

    • Origin of majority of circuit breaker faults

    • Simpler, more reliable without transferring unnecessarycomplexity to interrupter


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New solutions

Introduction of the MOTOR DRIVE!

  • SIMPLICITY

    • ONE moving part

  • INNOVATION

    • Full electronic control

    • Inherent monitoring

    • Future proof

  • PERFORMANCE

    • 10,000 + operations

    • Optimal travel curve

  • EXPERIENCE

    • Tap changers & MV

A revolution in circuit breaker technology!


Project history and development kenneth jabrand l.jpg

A REVOLUTION IN CIRCUIT BREAKER OPERATING MECHANISM TECHNOLOGY CARILEC 2002

Project History and Development

Kenneth Jabrand


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New solutions

Motor Drive: Concept to product

  • Idea to drive circuit breaker with Motor in early 1990’s

  • Major hurdle existed for HV application

  • By 1994, electronics & electromagnets see significant gains in technology

    • Possible to use on MV


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New solutions

Motor Drive: Concept to product

  • By 1996, further gains in electronics & electromagnet technology

    • HV applications now a realistic possibility

    • Decision to pursue concept

  • 1998 sees first prototype verification tests

    • Proves concept is feasible

    • Product development begins


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Technology

Energy

Transmission

Control & Signaling

Energy

Release

Energy

Storage

Energy

Charging

Today’s Circuit Breaker Drives

  • Energy transmission & release

    • Mechanical latch, linkage & damper

  • Reliable energy storage

    • Charged springs (constant, pre-set)

  • Energy charging

    • Motor charged close spring

  • Control & signaling

    • Discrete electromechanical limit & auxiliary switches

  • Safe operational control

    • Electro-mechanical interlocks

    • Discrete hard-wired control

  • Hard-wired

  • Mechanicallymodular


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Benefits

Benefits of Today’s Drive Technology

  • Energy stored in springs

    • Constant energy

    • Consistent operating times

    • No maintenance

  • Few moving parts

    • Simplicity  Reliability

  • Modular core design

    • Adaptable to broad range

    • Common spare parts

    • Common operating principle

  • Robust, 10000 operation life


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Obstacles

Limitations of Today’s Drive Technology

  • Motor charged close springs

    • High short term battery loads

  • Trip springs

    • Fixed energy

  • Electro-mechanical latches

    • Precision mechanisms

  • Mechanical energy transmission

    • High impacts & dampers

  • Hard-wired, discrete controls

    • Limited flexibility & intelligence

  • Limited, pre-set functionality

    • Designed for general application


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Technology

Energy

Transmission

Control & Signaling

Energy

Release

Energy

Storage

Energy

Charging

Tomorrow’s Circuit Breaker Drives

  • Energy transmission & release

    • Single moving part for transmission

    • Controlled, electronic release

    • Adaptable to switching application

  • Energy charging & storage

    • Electrical  low-power maintenance

  • Control & signaling

    • Monitoring inherent to control system

    • Additional features for the future

  • Safe operational control

    • “Soft-wired”  Flexible

    • Inherent, on-line “Watchdogs”

  • Soft-wired

  • Electronicallymodular


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Requirements

Why Motor Drive in 2001?

  • Technology now makes it possible at an acceptable cost

  • Increased functionality compared to conventional drives

    • Same benefits

    • None of the limitations

  • Meets increasing Customer demands

    • Higher reliability

    • Low power demand

    • Flexibility

    • Monitoring


A technological revolution for circuit breakers kenneth jabrand l.jpg

A REVOLUTION IN CIRCUIT BREAKER OPERATING MECHANISM TECHNOLOGY CARILEC 2002

A technological revolution for circuit breakers

Kenneth Jabrand


What is motor drive l.jpg

Function

What is Motor Drive?

Energy

Transmission

Control & Signaling

  • A digitally controlled motor directly moving the circuit-breaker contacts

  • Advantages:

    • Only ONE (1) moving part

    • Programmed optimum contact travel

    • Robust, modular system

    • Continuous, active on-line monitoring

    • Very quiet

    • Low, stable power requirements

EnergyRelease

Energy

Buffer

Energy

Charging

System Overview

System Demonstration


Motor drive system overview l.jpg

New solution

LOW POWER FLOW

HIGH POWER FLOW

CONTROL SIGNALS

MEASURMENT SIGNALS

Motor Drive System Overview

AC

Capacitor

Unit

Converter

Unit

Charging

Unit

DC

I/O

Unit

Motor

Control

Unit

CLOSED

Resolver

00099

mm

I

O

Back to Start

OPEN

msec

Programmed

Breaker Contact Travel


Motor drive system demonstration l.jpg

Function

Motor Drive System Demonstration

AC

Capacitor

Unit

Converter

Unit

Charging

Unit

DC

I/O

Unit

Motor

Control

Unit

CLOSED

<<TRIP

Resolver

00100

00099

I

O

mm

Back to Start

OPEN

msec

Breaker Contact Travel


Motor unit l.jpg

Technology

Motor Unit

Energy Transmission

  • High torque, servo-motor

  • Only moving part in the Motor Drive

  • Integrated, precision position “resolver”

  • Low mechanical stress

  • Low noise level

System Overview

Previous Slide


Converter unit l.jpg

Technology

Converter Unit

Energy Release

  • Transmits energy from Capacitor Unit to Motor Unit

  • Simple, electronic energy transmission

  • Uses proven industrial power electronics

  • Controlled via Control Unit

System Overview

Previous Slide


Control unit l.jpg

Technology

Control Unit

Energy Release

  • Stores & executes contact travel program

    • Interfaces via I/O Unit

    • Controls Motor via Converter

    • Checks Motor position via Resolver continuously

    • Feedback control algorithm

  • Contact travel program stored in robust EEPROM

  • Inherent monitoring

System Overview

Previous Slide


Capacitor unit l.jpg

Technology

Capacitor Unit

Energy Buffer

  • Energy “buffered” in capacitor bank

  • Capacity without recharging

    • O - 0.3 s - CO

    • CO - 15 s - CO

  • Directly monitored

  • Modular installation package

System Overview

Previous Slide


Charging unit l.jpg

Technology

Charging Unit

Energy Charging

  • Supplies Capacitor, Control and I/O Units

  • Redundant AC & DC supply inputs

    • Automatic switching to back-up supply

    • Alarm on supply failure

  • Stable, continuous power consumption < 60 W

    • No high transient loads!

System Overview

Previous Slide


Input output unit l.jpg

Technology

Input / Output Unit

Control & Signaling

  • All signals to/from one interface

  • Programmable permissive logic

  • Standard DC voltage interface supported

  • “Plug & Play” module

System Overview

Previous Slide


Monitoring l.jpg

Function

Monitoring

Control & Signaling

  • Motor Drive designed with integral active monitoring

    • NO extra hardware needed

    • ALL signals from one interface

  • Remote on-line “inspection”

  • Highest reliability for circuit- breaker and drive

  • Knowledge is security!

System Overview

Previous Slide


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References

Trial Installation 1: ENEL, Italy

  • PASS M0 with Motor Drive for 3-pole operation

  • Installed in ENEL’s Certaldo Substation near Tuscany

  • Installed 20 July, 2000

  • Application: 145 kV line feeding transformer

  • Satisfactory performance to date

System Overview

Previous Slide


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References

Trial Installation 2: BirkaNät, Sweden

  • LTB 145D1/B with Motor Drive for 3-pole operation

  • Installed in BirkaNät Dalarna AB’s Blyberg Substation near Älvdalen

  • Installed 15 Nov., 2000

  • Application: 132 kV line / transformer protection

  • Satisfactory performance to date

System Overview

Previous Slide


Increased functionality with motor drive l.jpg

Performance

Increased Functionality with Motor Drive

  • APPLICATION

    SCOPE

FLEXIBLE platform for new functionality

  • CONTROLLED

    SWITCHING

NEW application potential

INTEGRATED control platform

  • MONITORING

    PLATFORM

Inherent PROACTIVE monitoring

Platform for EXPANDED data collection

NO ”add-on sensors” needed

  • UPGRADESCOPE

FUNCTIONALLY MODULAR design

“Plug & Play”

  • SUBSTATION

    AUTOMATION

BUILT with Automation Technology

System Overview

Previous Slide


Increased performance with motor drive l.jpg

Performance

Increased Performance with Motor Drive

  • RELIABILITY

ONE (1) moving part

LOW reaction forces

  • MAINTENANCE

NO lubrication

NO wearing mechanical components

INTEGRATED, ACTIVE system monitoring

  • CONSISTENCY

Digitally DRIVEN contact travel

  • AUXILIARY PLANTNEEDS

Less than 100 W STABLE energy draw

  • ENVIRONMENTALIMPACT

Very LOW operation noise

NO oil

LOW auxiliary power consumption

System Overview

Previous Slide


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Motor Drive

Solution for ALL HVCB Applications

  • Motor Drive will be implemented in ALL ABB high voltage circuit-breaker applications

    • Live Tank Circuit-Breakers

    • Dead Tank Circuit-Breakers

    • GIS

    • PASS

    • Compact & COMPASS

    • Combined

    • Generator Circuit-Breakers


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