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Designing a System that Works: How Schools and Teachers Make a Difference for Student Achievement


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Designing a System that Works: How Schools and Teachers Make a Difference for Student Achievement. Barnett BerrySeptember 28, 2010. Long History of Failed Performance-Pay Plans. Long History of Failed Performance-Pay Plans. 2010 Vanderbilt Study on Nashville’s POINT Model .

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Designing a System that Works: How Schools and Teachers Make a Difference for Student Achievement

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Designing a system that works how schools and teachers make a difference for student achievement

Designing a System that Works:How Schools and Teachers Make a Difference for Student Achievement

Barnett BerrySeptember 28, 2010


Long history of failed performance pay plans

Long History of Failed Performance-Pay Plans

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


Long history of failed performance pay plans1

Long History of Failed Performance-Pay Plans

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


2010 vanderbilt study on nashville s point model

2010 Vanderbilt Study on Nashville’s POINT Model

  • 3-year experimental study of middle school math teachers in Metro Nashville Public Schools

  • Bonuses for test scores ranging from $5,000-$15,000

  • No additional supports provided or measures used

  • No lasting or statistically significant effect other than 5th grade and that effect did not last through the end of 6th grade

  • Springer, M.G., Ballou, D., Hamilton, L., Le, V., Lockwood, J.R., McCaffrey, D., Pepper, M., & Stecher, B. (2010). Teacher pay for performance: Experimental evidence from the Project on Incentives in Teaching. Nashville, TN:

  • National Center on Performance Incentives at Vanderbilt University.

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


Common themes in design and implementation of six tif sites

Common Themes in Design and Implementation of Six TIF Sites

  • Aligned system of performance-pay, professional development, collaboration, and evaluation

  • Wide stakeholder involvement in the design and implementation

  • Incentives as just one part of a broader emphasis on improving teaching and learning

  • Eckert, J. (2010, August). Performance-based compensation: Design and implementation at six Teacher Incentive Fund sites. Santa Monica, CA: National Institute for Excellence in Teaching.

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


Common themes in design and implementation of six tif sites1

Common Themes in Design and Implementation of Six TIF Sites

  • Opportunities for teacher leadership in providing school-based support, evaluation, and oversight for instructional improvement

  • Financial and programmatic support from states and districts

  • Reallocation of state and district funds to support performance compensation reforms

  • Eckert, J. (2010, August). Performance-based compensation: Design and implementation at six Teacher Incentive Fund sites. Santa Monica, CA: National Institute for Excellence in Teaching.

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


Limitations of value added models

Limitations of Value-added Models

  • Students are not randomly assigned to teachers.

  • There is a lack of properly scaled year-to-year tests (i.e., geometry teacher can’t be judged on students’ previous performance in algebra).

  • Student mobility undermines stability.

  • Many students are taught the same subject by more than one teacher.

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


Limitations of value added models1

Limitations of Value-added Models

  • VAM models are unstable in distinguishing among teachers in the middle ranges of performance.

  • Depending on the VAM statistical model a researcher uses, the same teacher can be identified as effective or ineffective.

  • The same teacher’s effectiveness rating changes depending on the school in which he or she teaches.

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


Designing a system that works how schools and teachers make a difference for student achievement

Power of Peer Learning among Teachers: Where Teachers Share Expertise,

Student Achievement Increases

Jackson, C. K. & Bruegmann, E. (2009, July). Teaching students and teaching each other: The importance of peer learning for teachers. NBER Working Paper 15202. Cambridge, MA: NBER.

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


Collaboration is key

Collaboration is Key

91% of teachers agree that “other teachers contribute to my success in the classroom.”

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


What matters most for teacher effectiveness

What Matters Mostfor Teacher Effectiveness

  • Developing high-quality preparation, certification, and induction programs, especially for high-needs schools

  • Providing high quality joint professional development

  • Cultivating strong principals who value teacher leadership

  • Supporting students out of school

Making a Difference for Student Achievement


The conditions that allow teachers to teach effectively

The Conditions that Allow Teachers to TeachEffectively

  • Staffing schools to build on collective experience and expertise

  • Involving teachers in staffing decisions and peer review

  • Building skill/creating time to collaborate: horizontally and vertically

  • Eliminating out-of-field assignments

  • Managing student mobility

  • Making a Difference for Student Achievement


    Designing a p4p system that works four criteria

    Designing a P4P System that Works: Four Criteria

    • Focus on student learning as well as teacher learning and leadership

    • Use of professional judgment, not just statistics, to determine who is effective

    • Use of accountability data to improve and spread expertise, not just reward it

    • Time for teachers to develop, monitor, and improve the system

    Making a Difference for Student Achievement


    For more information

    For More Information

    • Barnett Berry, CTQ

    • 500 Millstone Drive, Suite 102Hillsborough, NC 27278

    • email: bberry@teachingquality.org

    • ph: 919-241-1575

    • www.teachingquality.org

    • www.teacherleaders.org

    Making a Difference for Student Achievement