Supervising international hdr candidates in 2010
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Supervising International HDR Candidates in 2010. A/P Heather Fehring – Facilitator Dr. Robyn Barnacle – Chairperson Panel: Dr Ly Tran and Mr. Badrul Isa 26 th May 2010. International Students Studying in Australia.

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Supervising International HDR Candidates in 2010

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Supervising international hdr candidates in 2010

Supervising International HDR Candidates in 2010

A/P Heather Fehring – Facilitator

Dr. Robyn Barnacle – Chairperson

Panel: Dr Ly Tran and Mr. Badrul Isa

26th May 2010


International students studying in australia

International Students Studying in Australia

  • There were 631.935 enrolments by full fee-paying international students in Australia on a student visa in 2009.

  • China and India were the largest source countries in both enrolment and commencements.

  • In Higher Education (HE) in Australia in 2009 there were 203,324 enrolments.

  • In HE, China was the largest source country (64,406 enrolments), India was the second largest country (27,535 enrolments)

  • Source: Australian Education International, DEEWR.

  • http://www.aei.gov.au/AEI/Default.aspxAccess date 21st May 2010.

School of Education, D&SC College


International students who are they

International Students. Who are they?

  • We need to remember that International students are not an homogeneous group of postgraduate research candidates.

  • First, we have Onshore International students, Offshore International students and International students that have become Australian residents and Australian citizens.

  • Secondly, we have native speaking International students from Canada, UK and the USA. In addition, we have second and third language speaking International students from Europe, Asia, Africa and South America.

    All these International students have different needs and expectations.

School of Education, D&SC College


Challenges

Challenges

  • Language differences related to speaking, listening, writing and reading.

  • Cultural differences relating to the following:

  • i) Knowledge of the country in which they are studying.

  • ii) Knowledge about the academic expectations of the institution in which they are studying. Some international students will expect a hierarchical relationship, tight control, clear direction and guidance from their supervisors who they hold in high esteem.

  • iii)Knowledge about the practices of studying in the College and School in which they are studying. Many international students are totally unprepared for the isolation and independence of postgraduate research study.

  • Time requirements: Supervising is an intense form of teaching. The sustained and complex nature of this teaching and learning relationship take a lot of time and energy.

    Get involved in the current workload negotiations and policy formation. Argue for more time to be made available than the current supervisory allocation of 1hour F/T or 30 minutes P/T (RMIT Minimum Resources Policy).

School of Education, D&SC College


How can we assist our international students

How can we assist our International students?

  • Get to know your students personally. The supervisory relationship has a particularly personal dimension. Research students are highly individual and have different expectations and preferences for ways working. Effective supervisors recognise, value and finds ways of working with this diversity.

  • Speak clearly and slowly rather that at the pace Australian usually speak.

  • Organise a ‘buddy’ system where two or three PhD students can meet socially and support each other especially in the first year of candidature.

  • Explain in simple and detailed or explicit terms rather than by using complex language.

    • This is a grammatically correct sentence, but what meaning does it have for you?

      “The ontological and epistemological perspective of your research paradigm is not obvious.”

School of Education, D&SC College


How can we assist our international students1

How can we assist our International students?

  • Remember that International students may not be as familiar with local slang, idioms or proverbs so use multiple examples and clarify for understanding.

  • Slang: arty-farty (pretentious or affected specifically in relation to the arts and culture)

  • Dipstick or drongo (an idiot, foolish or stupid person)

  • Dead horse (tomato sauce) Dead ringer (a person who is almost identical to another)

  • Idiom: The bottom line is ...The wear and tear of the daily grind...

    • It is raining cats and dogsKick the bucketAs high as a kite

  • Proverb: You can lead a horse to water but you cannot make it drink

    • A rolling stone gathers no moss

    • Every cloud has a silver lining

    • A chain is only as strong as its weakest link

    • A leopard cannot change its spots

    • A picture paints a 1,000 words.

  • School of Education, D&SC College


    How can we assist our international students2

    How can we assist our International students?

    • Support our research postgraduates to use the many opportunities available at RMIT.

      i) School of Graduate Research - SGR “On Track” Workshops (writing, study skills, research literacy).

      ii) Global Studies and Social Science and Planning – GSSSP in the Design and Social Context College. English language support program for Higher Degree by Research students. Contact Professor Pavla Miller in GSSSP. Other Colleges and Schools run similar programs.

      iii) Complete the ‘Needs Analysis’ form from your School’s Research Office and discuss your students’ particular needs with your DHR&I.

      iv) Alert you research students to the wonderful new $2,000.00 Conference attendance support grant available from SGR.

      v) Encourage your students to write early and often. This can help over come the writer’s block so often experienced by PhD candidates.

    School of Education, D&SC College


    How can we assist our international students3

    How can we assist our International students?

    • Discuss the expectations from the student’s perspective and from the supervisor’s perspective very early on in the candidature. There can be quite different expectations about how much direction should be given and received by a PhD candidate. Phillips and Pugh (2005) have documented nine expectations PhD students have of their supervisors. Students expect:

    • to be supervised

    • Supervisors to read their work in advance

    • Supervisors to be available when needed

    • Supervisors to be friendly, open and supportive

    • Supervisors to be constructively critical

    • Supervisors to have a good working knowledge of the research area

    • Supervisors to structure an interactive session so it is easy to exchange ideas

    • Supervisors to be interested in their research and to direct the student to new information

    • Supervisors to be interested in their success and assist them with their future career opportunities (pp.145-154).

    School of Education, D&SC College


    How can we assist our international students4

    How can we assist our International students?

    • Phillips and Pugh (2005) have also documented what supervisors expect from their PhD students.

    • Supervisors expect students :

      • To be independent

      • To produce work that is not just in first draft form

      • To have regular meetings

      • To be honest when reporting their progress

      • To follow the advice that they give their students, especially when it has been requested

      • To be excited about their work and enjoy the process of discovery (pp. 97-103).

    • Obtain a copy of the RMIT. (2009) Assessment Policies and Procedures Manual A policy guide to assessment at RMIT Higher Education and VET 2009. Read Section 6 Academic Integrity and refer your students to Section 6.1 Student Responsibilities, pp. 38 – 40. It is a very useful exercise to remind students about their responsibilities in their own learning journeys.

    School of Education, Design &Social Context College


    Resources to support both students and supervisors

    Resources to support both students and supervisors

    • Endnote 13 reference book and CD

    • American Psychological Association. (October 2009). Publication manual of the American Psychology Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: APA.

    • Refer your students to the terrific RMIT librarians who run regular and excellent workshops on both Endnote and APA referencing guideline sessions.

    • Anderson, J., & Poole, M. (2001). Assignment and thesis writing (4th ed.). Milton, Queensland: John Wiley& Sons Australia, Ltd.

    School of Education, D&SC College


    Research books for both students and supervisors

    Research Books for both students and supervisors

    • A generic research methodology book, as for example:

    • Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research design. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    • A generic research process book as for example:

    • Bouma, G. D., & Ling, R. (2004). The research process (5th ed.). South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.

    • A generic research dictionary, as for example:

    • Jupp, V. (Ed.). (2006). The SAGE dictionary of social research methods. London: Sage.

    • Schwandt, T. A. (2007). The SAGE dictionary of qualitative inquiry (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    School of Education, D&SC College


    Very useful reference material

    Very useful reference material

    • James, R., & Baldwin, G. (1999). Eleven practices of effective postgraduate supervisors. Centre for the Study of Higher Education and the School of Graduate Studies, The University of Melbourne. Retrieved 15th May, 2010, from http://www.cshe.unimelb.edu.au.pdfs/11practices.pdf

    • Phillips, E. M., & Pugh, D. S. (2005). How to get a PhD. A handbook for students and their supervisors (4th ed.). Maidenhead, Berkshire, UK: Open University Press. RMIT library 378.240941 P558

    • Ryan, J. (2005) Improving teaching and learning practices for international students: Implications for curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. In J. Carroll & J. Ryan (Eds), Teaching international students: Improving learning for all. New York: Routledge. RMIT 378.1982691 T253

    • Denholm, Carey & Evans, Terry. (2006). Doctorates downunder series. Camberwell, Victoria: ACER Press. RMIT 378.1550993 D637

      • Doctorates Downunder $36.95 (ACER)

      • Supervising Doctorates Downunder $44.95 (ACER)

      • Beyond Doctorates Downunder $49.95 (ACER)

    School of Education, D&SC College


    Issues

    Issues

    • Should a supervisor be editing a research postgraduate student’s writing?

    • How much editing should a supervisor be doing?

    • What time allocation can a supervisors be giving and/or should a supervisor be giving?

    School of Education, D&SC College


    References

    References

    • American Psychological Association. (October 2009). Publication manual of the American Psychology Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: APA.

    • Anderson, J., & Poole, M. (2001). Assignment and thesis writing (4th ed.). Milton, Queensland: John Wiley& Sons Australia, Ltd.

    • Bouma, G. D., & Ling, R. (2004). The research process (5th ed.). South Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press.

    • Carroll, J., & Ryan, J. (Eds.). (2005). Teaching international students. Learning for all. Milton Park, Oxon, UK: Routledge.

    • Creswell, J. W. (2009). Research design. Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    • Denholm, C., & Evans, T. (Eds.). (2007). Supervising doctorates downunder. Keys to effective supervision in Australia and New Zealand. Camberwell, Victoria: ACER Press.

    • Eley, A. R., & Jennings, R. (2005). Effective postgraduate supervision. Improving the student-supervisor relationship. Maidenhead, Berkshire, UK: Open University Press.

    • Holbrook, A., & Johnston, S. (Eds.). (1999). Supervision of postgraduate research in education. Coldstream, Victoria: AARE.

    • James, R., & Baldwin, G. (1999). Eleven practices of effective postgraduate supervisors. Retrieved 15th May, 2010, from http://www.cshe.unimelb.edu.au.pdfs/11practices.pdf

    • Jupp, V. (Ed.). (2006). The SAGE dictionary of social research methods. London: Sage.

    • Phillips, E. M., & Pugh, D. S. (2005). How to get a PhD. A handbook for students and their supervisors (4th ed.). Maidenhead, Berkshire, UK: Open University Press.

    • Schwandt, T. A. (2007). The SAGE dictionary of qualitative inquiry (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

    School of Education, D&SC College


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