Fundamentals of writing
Download
1 / 53

Fundamentals of Writing - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 307 Views
  • Uploaded on

Fundamentals of Writing. April 7, 2014. Today. Doing research on the Internet (adapted from the Purdue Online Writing Lab – OWL ) Link: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/558/01 /. Argument. One of the keystones of university learning

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about ' Fundamentals of Writing' - axl


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

Today
Today

Doing research on the Internet (adapted from the Purdue Online Writing Lab – OWL)

Link: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/558/01/


Argument
Argument

One of the keystones of university learning

- Expressing a point of view & supporting it w/evidence

- Involves use of research, critical thinking, & logic

A good piece of argumentative writing:

- Demonstrates your understanding of material

- Demonstrates ability to use or apply the material i.e.) critique, apply it to something else, explain it in a different way.


Argumentative writing how to
Argumentative Writing – How to

Organizing your ideas – Make an outline

Organization type A:

Introduction (thesis statement)

Pro argument 1

Pro argument 2

Pro argument 3

Counterargument(s) and refutation [2 paragraphs]Conclusion


Argumentative writing how to1
Argumentative Writing – How to

Organizing your ideas – Make an outline

Organization type B:

Introduction (thesis statement)Counterargument(s) and refutation [2 paragraphs]

Pro argument 1

Pro argument 2

Pro argument 3

Conclusion


Argumentative essay how to
Argumentative Essay – How to

Requires the writer to

1.Investigate a topic.

2 Collect and evaluate evidence.

3. Establish a position on the topic.

4. Support that position.


Argumentative writing how to2
Argumentative Writing – How to

Requires the writer to

1.Investigate a topic.

2 Collect and evaluate evidence.

3. Establish a position on the topic.

4. Support that position.


The first thing you need for investigating a topic is
The first thing you need for investigating a topic is…

Research.


Traditionally
Traditionally

People went here for research

And used these:

Photo credit: blog.ivci.com

Photo credit: kmu.ac.kr

Photo credit: www.agoracosmopolitan.com


Research traditional vs online
Research: Traditional vs. Online

Traditional way to put ideas into print.

Write the paper  paper is reviewed by other academics (peers)  changes are suggested  author makes changes  re-submits the paper

How to put ideas online

Go to website  write something  press “submit” or “post”


Research traditional vs online1
Research: Traditional vs. Online

Using KMU’s library

library.kmu.ac.kr

  • KMU has purchased subscriptions to many academic journals (both domestic and international).

  • You can also use the library’s website to locate books in the libarary.

    Search “Applied Linguistics”


Research the internet
Research & the Internet

The Internet can be a great tool for research, but finding quality web materials and using them to your advantage in your writing can be challenging.


The need for evaluating sources
The need for evaluating sources

- Almost any person can publish almost anything on the Internet.

- Unlike most print sources, web sources do not have to be professionally accepted and edited to be published.


Looking for sources
Looking for Sources

You want to consider:

- Relevance (to your topic)

- Quality

- Bias


Looking for sources quality
Looking for Sources: Quality

Quality sources are:

  • Trustworthy facts.

  • Verifiable anecdotes (not, “My dad said…”).

  • Expert/Well-informed opinions.

    Also need to consider where the source got the information (first hand: primary or secondhand” secondary).


Looking for sources quality1
Looking for Sources: Quality

Possibly Quality:

  • Journal articles.

  • News articles.

  • Books/ PROFESSIONAL magazines.

  • Organizations’ websites.

  • Videos (i.e., TED)

Poor Quality:

  • Yahoo! Answers.

  • Wiki answers.

  • Wikipedia

  • Personal blogs.

  • Message boards.

  • Naver Cafes.


Looking for sources bias
Looking for Sources: Bias

Quality sources are:

“Studying writing is awesome!”

- Why did the author choose “awesome”?

This may not necessarily be objective.

Objective sources are more reliable because they rely less on peoples’ feelings and personal opinions.


Looking for sources bias1
Looking for Sources: Bias

Chevrolet Malibu (car)

- Chevrolet’s website:

http://www.chevrolet.com/malibu-mid-size-sedan.html

- Recent news story about GM recalls:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/gm-recalls-1-5-million-cars-over-power-steering-issue-1.2593275


Research on the internet
Research on the Internet

1.Use search engines to your advantage

2. Identify the web site

3. Examine for credibility

4. Determine depth and scope of information

5. Assess date of information


Types of web pages
Types of web pages

Informative pages

Personal web pages

Political/interest group pages

Marketing-oriented or “infomercial” pages

Entertainment pages


Search engines
Search Engines

- An Internet tool that locates web pages and sorts them according to specified keywords.

Obviously, Google is the most well-known, but there are others.

i.e., www.yahoo.com

www.bing.com (difficult to use in Korea  go through Daum.net)

http://www.excite.com/


Search engines1
Search Engines

Enter: flight mh370

into the following search engines:

www.yahoo.com

www.google.com


Meta search engines
Meta Search Engines

These sites collect and organize results from several search engines.

http://www.dogpile.com/

http://www.all4one.com/

http://www.metacrawler.com/


Meta search engines1
Meta Search Engines

Search for flight mh370

In

http://www.dogpile.com/


Google scholar
Google Scholar

Google Scholar (scholar.google.com)

www.scholar.google.com

“Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature.”


Using keywords
Using Keywords

Make sure to read the directions for each search engine to get the most out of your search.

Use words like “AND” and “OR” to limit your search and get more specified information.

i.e., If researching tobacco lawsuits and settlements


Using keywords1
Using Keywords

i.e., If researching tobacco lawsuits and settlements

- You could use these keywords in several combinations.

Cancer

Lawsuit

Tobacco

Smoking

Teenagers

Legislation

Settlements


Using keywords2
Using Keywords

Smart phone use in school

i.e., school smartphone statistics. smartphones in schools. School smartphone bans. Smartphone use in classrooms


Using keywords3
Using Keywords

Smartphone use in school

Altering your search – “quotation marks”

i.e.

smartphones dangerous

vs.

“smartphones are dangerous”


Using keywords4
Using Keywords

Smartphone use in school

Altering your search - AND

i.e.

smartphones dangerous AND expensive

NOTE: Different search engines have different functions and commands.


Evaluating sources
Evaluating sources

Use search engines to your advantage

- Identify the web site

- Examine for credibility

- Determine depth and scope of information

- Assess date of information


Evaluating sources identify website
Evaluating sources – identify website

Assess the authorship, content, and purpose of the web site.

This is important because

- many web sources are not checked for accuracy.

- some personal sites are used to express individual opinions about issues, but not necessarily the facts.- some sites may have purposes that differ from the first impressions.


Evaluating sources identify website1
Evaluating sources – identify website

Sometimes the actual purpose of the web site may not be clearly articulated.

Can be difficult to separate advertising from accurate information.

Some marketing sites will offer misleading information in attempts to sell their products.


Evaluating sources identify website2
Evaluating sources – identify website

Examples:

The Onion: http://www.theonion.com/

From last year, one famous article from The Onion:

http://www.theonion.com/articles/kim-jongun-named-the-onions-sexiest-man-alive-for,30379/


Evaluating sources identify website3
Evaluating sources – identify website

Examples:

http://www.martinlutherking.org/

Martin Luther King Jr. – A True Historical Examination


Evaluating sources identify website4
Evaluating sources – identify website

Examples:

WTO (World Trade Organization)

http://www.wto.org/

http://www.gatt.org/


Evaluating sources identify website5
Evaluating sources – identify website

Whenever possible, try to locate the home page.

You can often do this by eliminating some information from the end of the URL.

.org .gov

.com .net

.edu .us

.au .uk


Evaluating sources identify website6
Evaluating sources – identify website

Whenever possible, try to locate the home page.

You can often do this by eliminating some information from the end of the URL.

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue13/music/

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue13/

http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/


Evaluating sources identify website7
Evaluating sources – identify website

  • Is the site affiliated with a business or university?

  • Does the site offer information about a particular person or group?

  • Who is the creator of the site?

  • What is the purpose of the site?

  • Who is the audience of this site?

  • Can you purchase products at this site?


Examine for credibility
Examine for credibility

Credibility may be compromised by purposeful misinformation or by unintentional neglect.

Locating the name of the site’s creator may be challenging.

Credentials may be missing even if the author’s name is provided.


Examine for credibility1
Examine for credibility

Who is the author of the site?

What is the authority or expertise of the individual or group?

What else comes up when you type the author’s name into a search engine?

Does the source have a political or business agenda?

Is the site sponsored by a political or business group? If so, what can you find out about that group?


Examine for credibility2
Examine for credibility

Does the site provide a list of sources or a Works Cited page?

Can you locate any of the source material? How reliable is this material?

Are there links to other credible sites with additional information?

Does the site provide a link for emailing the author or webmaster?


Click the following link:

http://www.infowars.com/barack-obamas-de-facto-totalitarian-nation/

Next google search “Alex Jones”


Determine depth and scope of information
Determine depth and scope of information

Does the material show signs of research, such as references to other sources, hyperlinks, footnotes, or a reference page?

Does the author consider opposing points of view?

How closely does the site really match the information for which you are searching?

Corroborate information whenever possible!


Evaluating a website
Evaluating a website

Go to Google Scholar

www.scholar.google.com

Search: dangers of smartphones

  • Click on the first result

    “Paranoid Android”


Evaluating a website1
Evaluating a website

Compare the following:

http://studentblog.worldcampus.psu.edu/index.php/2014/03/the-dangers-of-smartphones-and-why-putting-it-down-may-help-you-in-school/

http://www.macdigita.com/technology/smartphones-suck/


Evaluating a website2
Evaluating a website

Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

DO NOT cite Wikipedia in any paper.

  • It is an open-access encyclopedia, meaning almost anyone can alter/edit the content of an entry.

  • The information on a Wikipedia page may not be reliable.


Evaluating a website3
Evaluating a website

Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

- You may use Wikipedia as a starting point for gathering information, though.

i.e., search “Toyota recall”


Evaluating a website4
Evaluating a website

Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page

- You may use Wikipedia as a starting point for gathering information, though.

i.e., search “Toyota recall”

- The “References” section provides you with possible sources of information.


Resources
Resources

- Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab

“Searching the Worldwide Web”

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/558/01/

- Internet Detective:

http://www.vtstutorials.ac.uk/detective/


Next blog entry
Next blog entry

Deadline: Tuesday April 15

Task: Write about a controversial issue related to your topic.

  • Form an argument about the topic.

  • Write in argumentative form (state your position in the argument and then support that position).

  • Write at least 2 paragraphs in support of your position.


Assignment 2 reminder
Assignment 2 Reminder

Bring a first draft of assignment 2 to class on

Monday April 14

What to bring:

- An outline of your essay

- A first draft of your essay


ad