Education professionalism and new times an international and democratic model
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Education professionalism and New Times: an international and democratic model. Prof. Ken Spours Centre for Post-14 Research and Innovation Institute of Education, University of London. Three global models of education ( Sahlberg , 2007).

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Education professionalism and new times an international and democratic model

Education professionalism and New Times: an international and democratic model

Prof. Ken Spours

Centre for Post-14 Research and Innovation

Institute of Education, University of London


Three global models of education sahlberg 2007

Three global models of education(Sahlberg, 2007)

  • 1. Anglo Saxon (e.g. US, England, New Zealand, Eastern Europe and now Africa) – markets, choice and competition; standardising teaching and learning and test-based accountability.

  • 2. Pacific (e.g. South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and now China) – authoritarian/conformist; high levels of parental/social support for education; didactic teaching methods; high expectations and normative behaviours.

  • 3. Nordic (e.g. Finland) – high status education profession; high trust relationships; devolved responsibilities within broad national frameworks; an emphasis on links between education, social services and localities linked to school improvement.


The anglo saxon neo liberal model of professionalism

The Anglo Saxon/neo-liberal model of professionalism

  • Anglo Saxon model of education – external, centralised assessment and accountability, choice and marketisation, standardised teaching

  • Managerial (bureaucratic, marketised) version of professionalism part of this model – New Labour and top-down professional standards + Coalition and market deregulation of professional standards

  • Effects on education profession – bureaucratised functions, transactions costs; performativity, compliance and lack of professional and creative freedom; now lack of professional standards particularly related to pedagogy (UCU 2013)


New times the new global context

New Times – the new global context

  • New Times is term for a ‘progressive tendency’ within neo-liberal globalisation – comprises technological, economic, social and political developments – a focus on soft power and growing civil society. (Adnan 2013)

  • New Times comprises the following features:

  • Horizontal networking, digital technologies and global connectivity

  • Flatter enterprises, co-operatives the concept of the social economy (Murray 2012)

  • International radical social movements (e.g. Occupy)

  • The idea of the relational society (Rustin 2007)

  • Focus on sustainability, wellbeing and human empathy (Adnan 2013)

  • A radical interpretation of New Times involves a rejection of free markets; top-down state; wealth inequalities; harming the planet and the social recession.


A democratic and ecological model of professionalism for new times

A democratic and ecological model of professionalism for New Times

  • New Times is a challenge to all the global models, even the Nordic variant

  • Beyond ‘dual professionalism’ (expertise in an area of knowledge/practice and pedagogical expertise)

  • ‘Triple professionalism’ (Hodgson and Spours, 2013) is democratic (Whitty & Wisby, 2006), activist (Sachs, 2003) and ecological (Barnett, 2012)

    • ethically driven

    • co-production with other professionals and students

    • fostering democratic institutions

    • ability to think and act on differing and expanding ecological ‘scalings’ or levels from the individual to the international

  • Ecological and democratic professionalism is ‘demanding’ (Barnett 2012) and needs high support in order to ‘shape New Times’


Professionalism international perspectives from the oecd

Professionalism: international perspectives from the OECD


Supporting democratic professionalism

Supporting democraticprofessionalism

  • The concepts of trust, empowerment, mutual accountability; multiple expertise; collaboration and professional capacity building:

  • Being qualified, new settlement in initial teacher education and licensing

  • Continuous professional learning, willingness to improve - movement towards a masters level profession?

  • Expansive school and college work environments – focused on supporting the development of expansive competences and expansive identity

  • Communities of practice through local, national and international teacher networks

  • Beyond self-regulation - new forms of democratic accountability at the local level

  • A new approach to inspection – focused on improvement and partnership with teachers and school leaders

  • A new national college of educators


Sources

Sources

Barnett, R. (2012) 'Towards an Ecological Professionalism' in C. Sugrue and T. DyrdalSolbrekke (eds.), Professional Responsibility: New Horizons of Praxis. Abingdon (Routledge).

Adnan, I. (2013) In New Times change happens when you are not looking

http://www.compassonline.org.uk/in-new-new-times-change-happens-while-you-are-not-looking-2/)

Hodgson, A. and Spours, K. (2013) Why IfL should support triple professionalism, InTuition, Issue 13, London: Institute for Learning.

Murray, R. (2009) in Danger and opportunity: Crisis and the new social economy, London: NESTA.

Rustin, M. (2013) ‘A Relational Society’ in After Neo-Liberalism: A Kilburn Manifesto

http://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/doreen-massey/after-neoliberalism-introduction-to-kilburn-manifesto

Sachs, J. (2003) The Activist Teaching Profession, Buckingham: Open University Press.

Sahlberg, P. (2007) Secondary education in OECD Countries Common Challenges, Differing Solutions, Turin: European Training, 2007.

Schleicher, A. (2011) Building a High Quality Teaching Profession. Lessons from Around the World. OECD. Available online at www.oecd.org/dataoecd/62/8/4706177.pdf.

UCU (2013) Towards a UCU policy on professionalism London: UCU.

Whitty, G. and Wisby, E. (2006). ‘Collaborative’ and ‘democratic’ professionalism: alternatives to ‘traditional’ and ‘managerial’ approaches to teacher autonomy. Educational Studies in Japan: International Yearbook No. 1, 25–36.


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