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Week 15: December 2-6, 2013 Unit III continues! 1920s, Great Depression, and New Deal. Americans , Ch. 12-13 History Alive! , Ch. 26-29. Homework: Review/verify Ch. 12 & 13 “ ttt ” answers, plus Ch. 26-29 History Alive! summaries Complete any late work or Second Chance Learning ASAP!.

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Week 15 december 2 6 2013 unit iii continues 1920s great depression and new deal

Week 15: December 2-6, 2013Unit IIIcontinues!1920s, Great Depression, and New Deal

Americans, Ch. 12-13

History Alive!, Ch. 26-29


Homework: Review/verify Ch. 12 & 13 “ttt” answers, plus Ch. 26-29 History Alive! summariesComplete any late work or Second Chance Learning ASAP!

Monday, December 9, 2013

I. Current Events “Conversation Piece”…15 points

LISTEN to NPR “newscast”

(Table group discussion and evaluation of Friday’s writings)

II. Review of Ch. 12 & 13, plus Alive! Summaries

Verify your answers…(15 pts each x two)

Submit LATE word wall tiles and/or “ttt” and summaries?


Why are we here today

Why are we here TODAY?

Students will listen & describe NPR’s hourly newscast, evaluate and discuss recent news stories (from Friday’s lesson), and build relationships via our relationship-building exercise known as “Conversation Piece.”


LISTEN for “connections” to ideas, events, themes, etc. from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.

When I hear the news from your “today,” it reminds me of when…


Who feels and hurts like us? from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.

Who HOPES and DREAMS like us?

How are today’s leaders “DEALING” with the struggles of life?

Unit III: The Roaring 20s, The Great Depression, and the New Deal


List your name in a box write connections notes
List your name in a box…WRITE “connections”/notes from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.


Conversation piece weekly warm up after weekend so we can have a wonderful year
“Conversation Piece” from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.Weekly warm-up after weekend so we can have a wonderful year…

  • a recent news event worthy of discussion OR…

    B) a personal experience worth sharing OR…

    C) a fact, quote, or “this day in history” event

    -a handout will be provided to startthe conversation IF necessary!

    THINK…what if I am picked to share?

5 minutes


Readings work for unit iii the roaring 20s the great depression and the new deal
READINGS/WORK for Unit III from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.: The Roaring 20s, The Great Depression, and the New Deal

History Alive!Era 4, p. 326-327:

The Roaring Twenties and Great Depression

Unit 8: The Twenties

Ch. 26 (p. 330-341)

Understanding Postwar Tensions

Ch. 27 (p. 342-351)

The Politics of Normalcy

Ch. 28 (p. 353-367)

Popular Culture in the Roaring Twenties

Ch. 29 (p. 369-379)

Clash Between Traditionalism & Modernism

Unit 9: Great Depression and the New Deal

Ch. 30 (p. 382-391)

The Causes of the Great Depression

Ch. 31 (p. 392-399)

The Response to the Economic Collapse

Ch. 32 (p. 400-411)

Human Impact of the Great Depression

Ch. 33 (p. 412-427)

The New Deal and its Legacy

The AmericansUnit 4, p. 408-409:

The 1920s and the Great Depression

Ch. 12 (p. 410-431)

The Politics of the Roaring Twenties

Ch. 13 (p. 432-461)

The Roaring Life of the 1920s

Ch. 14 (p. 462-485)

The Great Depression

Ch. 15 (p. 486-523)

The New Deal

5 points

10 points

5 points

10 points

You EARN two separate, 15-point MINOR grades today!


Chapter 12 summary politics of the roaring twenties
Chapter 12, Summary from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.Politics of the Roaring Twenties

  • Americans’ dislike of foreigners in the 1920s was revealed by the Red Scare, by the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, by a trend towards isolationism and by laws limiting immigration.

    2. The labor movement in the 1920s had some successes but mostly went into a period of declining membership, in part because unions were labeled as radicals.

    3. Five nations, including the United States, signed an agreement to dismantle parts of their navies. Also, 64 nations signed the Kellogg-Briand Treaty promising to give up war as an instrument of foreign policy.

    4. He made poor choices, which brought incidents of bribery and corruption such as the Teapot Dome Scandal and Elk Hills.

    5. The business boom was stimulated by a rise in productivity and by the growth of buying on credit.


Chapter 13 summary the roaring life of the 1920s
Chapter 13, Summary from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.The Roaring Life of the 1920s

1. Prohibition—the attempt to make the sale of alcohol illegal—and the conflict between fundamentalism and science symbolized in the Scopes trial

both reveal the clash between new and traditional values in the 1920s.

2. There were more work opportunities for women in the 1920s than in prior years, but they faced discrimination and unequal treatment. Women were becoming more independent and assertive. In their home lives, women more often were free to choose their own husbands, although the divorce

rate increased. They had fewer children. They enjoyed many conveniences that made housework easier.

3. Through national magazines, radio, and movies, the mass media helped create a national culture.

4. Among the personal achievements of the Harlem Renaissance were the writings of Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, and Zora Neale Hurston; the acting of Paul Robeson; and the music of Louis Armstrong, “Duke” Ellington, and Bessie Smith.


Alive 26 understanding postwar tensions
Alive! 26 from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.- Understanding Postwar Tensions

  • Rising economic, political, and social tensions marked the years just after World War I. This tense atmosphere affected the murder trial of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti. Both men were sentenced to death, despite weak evidence. Some Americans saw Sacco and Vanzetti as victims of prejudice against immigrants and radicals.

  • Recession A poorly planned demobilization resulted in an economic recession after World War I. As unemployment rose, living standards for all but the richest Americans declined.

  • Labor unrest Unions staged thousands of strikes for better wages and working conditions. Despite these efforts, unions began to lose strength, and their membership declined.

  • Red Scare Fear of socialists, communists, and anarchists fueled the Red Scare. Attorney General Mitchell Palmer led raids against suspected subversives, often violating their civil liberties.

  • Immigration restriction Congress responded to anti-immigrant pressure by restricting immigration. A quota system also limited the number of immigrants from each country.

  • Back-to-Africa movement African Americans were disappointed that their service to the country in World War I did not reduce racial prejudice. Marcus Garvey's Back-to-Africa movement appealed to blacks who had given up hope for equality in the United States.

  • Discrimination Nativism surged in the postwar years. A revived Ku Klux Klan targeted blacks, immigrants, Jews, and Catholics as un-American. The Anti-Defamation League began in response to anti-Semitism. The American Civil Liberties Union formed to protect freedom of speech.


Alive 27 the politics of normalcy
Alive! 27 from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.- The Politics of Normalcy

  • The election of 1920 launched a decade-long Republican Era in national politics. During that time, three Republican presidents—Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover—worked to return the nation to "normalcy," or peace and prosperity.

  • Isolationism After World War I, many Americans favored a policy of isolationism, or withdrawal from international affairs.

  • Free enterprise system The Republican presidents supported individual enterprise and the free enterprise system by adopting business-friendly fiscal policies. The government cut taxes and spending.

  • Teapot Dome Scandal The Harding administration was marred by corruption. Harding's distress over the Teapot Dome Scandal contributed to his declining health. He died in office in 1923.

  • Washington Naval Conference The Republican presidents turned to diplomacy to prevent another world war. The Washington Naval Conference attempted to reduce military competition by limiting the size of the world's most powerful navies.

  • Kellogg-Briand Pact Sixty-two nations signed this treaty, in which they agreed to outlaw war.

  • Dawes Plan The United States set up the Dawes Plan to help European nations pay their war debts to American lenders.

  • Dow Jones Industrial Average Americans hoping to "get rich quick" engaged in speculation in land and stocks. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose as money flowed into the stock market.

  • Economic boom The economy prospered as businesses boomed. Business consolidation led to the domination of most major industries by just a few companies. However, poverty persisted, and many farmers and workers were left out of the boom.


Alive 28 popular culture in the roaring twenties
Alive! 28 from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.- Popular Culture in the Roaring Twenties

  • New ideas and prosperity brought change to American popular culture in the Roaring Twenties. The creative energy of writers, artists, filmmakers, and musicians, as well as innovations by businesspeople and inventors, all contributed to new directions in American life.

  • Consumer culture New products and advertising encouraged a buying spree. Credit and installment buying allowed people to buy now and pay later.

  • Mass media National magazines, radio, and motion pictures brought news, information, and entertainment to millions of Americans. Regional differences began to fade as a new national popular culture became part of daily life.

  • Women voters All women gained the vote in 1920. The League of Women Voters encouraged all voters to become informed about public issues. Congress considered, but rejected, the first version of the equal rights amendment.

  • The Jazz Age Jazz, a new form of music, expressed the mood of the decade. Introduced by African American musicians, jazz became popular throughout the country and the world.

  • Harlem Renaissance Musicians and writers centered in Harlem gave voice to the experiences of African Americans in song, poetry, and novels.

  • Lost Generation Disillusioned by World War I and the nation's growing consumer culture, some artists and writers fled to Paris. This "Lost Generation" produced books and poetry that are still read and enjoyed today.

  • Spectator sports More leisure time allowed Americans to attend sporting events. Spectator sports became a big business, and athletes became national celebrities.


Alive 29 the clash between traditionalism and modernism
Alive! 29 from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.- The Clash Between Traditionalism and Modernism

  • Culturally, the United States became a deeply divided nation during the Roaring Twenties. Tensions arose between traditionalists, with their deep respect for long-held cultural and religious values, and modernists, who embraced new ideas, styles, and social trends.

  • Urban versus rural By 1920, the United States was becoming more urban than rural. Urban areas prospered as business and industry boomed. Rural areas declined economically and in population.

  • Youth versus adults Suspicious of the older generation after the war, many young people rejected traditional values and embraced a new youth culture. Chaperoned courting gave way to unsupervised dating. Flappers scandalized the older generation with their style of dress, drinking, and smoking.

  • Wets versus drys The Eighteenth Amendment launched the social experiment known as prohibition. The Volstead Act, which outlawed the sale of alcohol, was supported by drys and ignored by wets. The Twenty-First Amendment repealed prohibition in 1933.

  • Religion versus science Religious fundamentalists worked to keep the scientific theory of evolution out of public schools. The Scopes trial, testing Tennessee's anti-evolution law, was a legal victory for fundamentalists but a defeat in the court of public opinion. The issue of teaching creationism in biology classes is still current today.


Homework: from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras. Use Ch. 26 Alive! to begin worksheet on post- war tensionsComplete any late work or Second Chance Learning ASAP!

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

I. Current Events…15 & 5 points

Table group discussion and evaluation of Friday’s articles & Monday’s newscast  writings

II. Review of Ch. 12 & 13, plus Alive! Summaries

Verify your answers…(15 pts each x two)

III. America’s Postwar Issues, Struggles, and Tensions

Reading worksheet distributed

Submit LATE word wall tiles and/or “ttt” and summaries?


Why are we here today1

Why are we here TODAY? from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.

Students will evaluate and discuss recent news stories (from Friday’s lesson), and begin exploration of Ch. 26 in History Alive: Understanding Post-War Tensions.


Current events
Current Events from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.

Title:

Source:Date:

Your will receive at least 4 articles for you to pick from!

1. READ or SKIM your article in the time provided, then SUMMARIZE 3-5+ key points or main messages.

2. What is the most essential point your partner MUST know and understand about this topic and WHY?

Group evaluation…3 points per question!

-1 if “something” is missing…

-2 if “most things” are missing…

-3 if BLANK


Current events1
Current Events from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.

3a. Debatable Issues or Discussion Questions

Thought-provoking, controversial, or challenging ideas?

3b. Applications for Today & Tomorrow

What “life lessons” (+ or -) or conclusions do you observe?

Let’s discuss some of these stories a bit more today!

What is the real value or use of these stories?


Current events collaboration
Current Events: from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.COLLABORATION

4. What did you LEARN from your partner’s story?

DESCRIBE the event(s) and why this is important/meaningful.

5. What were the most interesting points or stories shared during the whole class discussion?EXPLAIN

-1 if something is missing -2 if most things are missing -3 if blank

What did you LEARN or find most fascinating today?


Homework: from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras. READ/review 26.1 Intro on Sacco & Vanzetti trial (Periods 4-6 + tomorrow’s absentees: read each section intro related to the trial) *ALL: finish/review Ch. 26 NOTES on post-war tensions

Thursday, December 12, 2013

I. America’s Postwar Issues, Struggles, and Tensions

Inspect progress, then REVIEW & ENHANCE notes via Alive!

Tension Groups: Causes and Effects

http://positivelypassionateaboutteaching.blogspot.com/2013/10/cause-effect-song-video.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Tdr5ylzmG8

II. Sacco & Vanzetti Trial Preparations

Ch. 26, p. 331…Introduction

  • Current Events Writings Returned

    15 points…5/5 for too!


Why are we here today2

Why are we here TODAY? from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.

Students will review notes on Ch. 26: Understanding Post-War Tensions and add details related to “causes and effects;” begin preparations for the Sacco & Vanzetti “trial simulation;” receive feedback & grades on the recent current events activities (15 & 5 pts).


Homework review ch 26 1 and all section intros related sacco vanzetti clemency hearing
Homework: from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras. Review Ch. 26.1 and all section intros related Sacco & Vanzetti clemency hearing

Friday, December 13, 2013

I. Current Events Writings Returned…Per. 4-6

15 points…5/5 for too!

II. Recap America’s Postwar Tensions

Tension Groups Causes and Effects

http://positivelypassionateaboutteaching.blogspot.com/2013/10/cause-effect-song-video.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Tdr5ylzmG8

Postwar Intolerance Video

III. Sacco & Vanzetti Trial Preparations

Ch. 26.1, p. 331…Introduction(s)

Simulation roles?


Why are we here today3

Why are we here TODAY? from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.

Students will examine & record notes on Ch. 26: Understanding Post-War Tensions, begin preparations for the Sacco & Vanzetti “trial simulation,” and then receive feedback & grades on the recent current events activities (15 & 5 points).


List your name in a box write connections notes1
List your name in a box…WRITE “connections”/notes from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.


Postwar intolerance
Postwar Intolerance from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.


America s postwar issues struggles tensions
America’s Postwar Issues, Struggles, & Tensions from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.

History Alive! Ch. 26: Understanding Postwar Tensions (p. 331-341)

Following World War I, America faced 5 distinct types of problems. IDENTIFY the types of problems, then describe specific examples & details, including vocabulary words, in the spaces provided.

The Americans Ch. 12: 1 Politics of the Roaring Twenties (p. 410-418)


“Understanding Postwar Tensions” from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.America’sProblems, Struggles & Issues after WW IHistory Alive!Ch. 26, p. 331-340

  • There were 5 types of problems in the US:

    -Emerging EconomicTensions

    -Rising Labor Tensions

    -Growing PoliticalTensions

    -Increasing Social Tensions

    -Enduring Racial & Religious Tensions

  • As you examine the images & info to follow, ENHANCE your notes from 12/11/13…


A from the Roaring 1920s, Great Depression, & New Deal eras.hotly protested criminal trial, held from 1920 to 1927, in which Italian immigrants Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were convicted of robbing and murdering two men and sentenced to death; many people believed that the trial was unfair and that the defendants were prosecuted because they were anarchists, not because they were guilty.

Sacco and Vanzetti


As soon as World War I ended, the federal government canceled its contracts with weapons manufacturers, like this one in New Jersey. Hundreds of thousands of factory workers were laid off. At the same time, the army released nearly 4 million soldiers. The result was massive unemployment and an economic recession.Like many workers after World War I, Sacco and Vanzetti were union men. A poorly planned demobilization resulted in an economic recession after World War I. As unemployment rose, living standards for all but the richest Americans declined.


You be the judge
You be the “judge!” canceled its contracts with weapons manufacturers, like this one in New Jersey. Hundreds of thousands of factory workers were laid off. At the same time, the army released nearly 4 million soldiers. The result was massive unemployment and an economic recession

Reasons they may be NOT guilty?

Reasons they do NOT deserve a retrial or freedom?


When soldiers and sailors shipped home from Europe at the war’s end, they found the nation in economic distress. Government employment posters, like the one above, encouraged employers to hire veterans. But the jobs simply did not exist.


  • demobilization war’s end, they found the nation in economic distress. Government employment posters, like the one above, encouraged employers to hire veterans. But the jobs simply did not exist. : the act of discharging forces from military service or use

  • recession: a period in which there is a decline in economic activity and prosperity


In January 1919, nearly every worker in Seattle, Washington, went on strike over wages and working conditions. For five days, most economic activity in the city halted. Despite public fear of food shortages and revolution, neither came to pass.

In 1919, unions staged more than 3,600 strikes across the country, creating the greatest wave of labor unrest in the nation's history.


Strike-related violence, such as shown here, fueled some Americans’ fears that radical union activity might lead to revolution. Public fear of radicals contributed to unions’ decline.


American federation of labor afl
American Federation of Labor Americans’ fears that radical union activity might lead to revolution. Public fear of (AFL)

  • dominant force in the union movement.

  • a group of unions representing skilled workers, such as machinists or mechanics, organized by their craft.

  • best known for "bread and butter" unionism. It concentrated on improving wages and working conditions for its union members.

  • middle-class Americans began to view unionism as a threat to their way of life.

  • diminishing power of unions had a negative effect on workers.


Boston police strike 1919
Boston Police Strike Americans’ fears that radical union activity might lead to revolution. Public fear of (1919)

  • most controversial strike of 1919

  • police walked off the job after city officials cut their wages and refused to negotiate with their union.

  • citizens initially felt sympathy for the police, but that vanished as the city lapsed into anarchy.

  • Residents set up citizen patrols to fight rising crime. Governor Calvin Coolidge called in National Guard troops to keep order. "There is no right to strike against the public safety by anybody, anywhere, any time."

  • Coolidge fired the striking policemen and hired new ones. His firm stand made Coolidge a national hero. The next year, the Republican Party nominated him as its candidate for vice president.


  • radicalism Americans’ fears that radical union activity might lead to revolution. Public fear of : a point of view favoring extreme change, especially in social or economic structure

  • communism: an economic or political system in which the state or the community owns all property and the means of production, and all citizens share the wealth

  • Palmer Raids: conducted by Justice Department attorney J. Edgar Hoover at the instruction of U.S. Attorney General Mitchell Palmer, a series of unauthorized raids on homes, businesses, and meeting places of suspected subversives that resulted in the arrest of 6,000 radicals, often without any evidence against them


Red scare
Red Scare Americans’ fears that radical union activity might lead to revolution. Public fear of

  • lasting from 1919 to 1920, a campaign launched by U.S. attorney general Mitchell Palmer and implemented by Justice Department attorney J. Edgar Hoover to arrest communists and other radicals who promoted the overthrow of the U.S. government

  • revived during the Cold War by Senator Joseph McCarthy during a period of anticommunism lasting from 1950 to 1957.


Discrimination Americans’ fears that radical union activity might lead to revolution. Public fear of

  • The rising tide of immigrants triggered a resurgence of nativism along with calls for immigration restriction

  • nativists feared that the latest immigrants would never become "100 percent American.”

  • Congress responded to anti-immigrant pressure by passing the Emergency Immigration Act of 1921


Notice the two big dips in this graph. The first one follows passage of the Emergency Immigration Act of 1921. The second shows the impact of the Immigration Act of 1924.


The first Ku Klux Klan arose during Recon­struction to intimidate freedmen. It faded away after Reconstruction but was reborn in 1915. This new KKK targeted African Americans, immigrants, Jews, Catholics, and anyone with values that Klan members saw as “un-American.”Klan membership swelled to 3-4 million members and gained considerable political power throughout the country.The KKK portrayed itself as a defender of American values.


American civil liberties union aclu
American Civil Liberties intimidate freedmen. It faded away after Reconstruction but was reborn in 1915. This new KKK targeted African Americans, immigrants, Jews, Catholics, and anyone with values that Klan members saw as “un-AmericanUnion (ACLU)

  • The views of nativists and the Klan did not go unchallenged.

  • In 1920, a group of pacifists and social activists founded the to protect freedom of speech.

  • The ACLU specialized in the defense of unpopular individuals and groups


Violence against African Americans did not end after the summer of 1919. Two years later, rioting in Tulsa, Oklahoma, left at least 75 African Americans dead. The Tulsa riots began when a local newspaper published a false report of a white woman being attacked by a black man. In one night, white rioters burned 35 blocks of homes and stores.


Discrimination
Discrimination summer of 1919. Two years later, rioting in Tulsa, Oklahoma, left at least 75 African Americans dead. The Tulsa riots began when a local newspaper published a false report of a white woman being attacked by a black man. In one night, white rioters burned 35 blocks of homes and stores.

  • Asian immigrants also faced severe legal discrimination.

  • The influx of 2.4 million Jewish immigrants from eastern Europe stirred up anti-Semitism (anti-Semitism: policies, views, and actions that discriminate against Jewish people; prejudice against Jews)

  • Anti-Defamation League(ADL)

    Organization formed to "to stop the defamation [false accusation] of the Jewish people." Its longer-term mission was "to secure justice and fair treatment to all citizens alike."

  • Catholics were also targets of religious prejudice.


Born in Jamaica, Marcus Garvey traveled widely throughout the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

Back to Africa?


Chapter 12 summary politics of the roaring twenties1
Chapter 12, Summary the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa. Politics of the Roaring Twenties

  • Americans’ dislike of foreigners in the 1920s was revealed by the Red Scare, by the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, by a trend towards isolationism and by laws limiting immigration.

    2. The labor movement in the 1920s had some successes but mostly went into a period of declining membership, in part because unions were labeled as radicals.

    3. Five nations, including the United States, signed an agreement to dismantle parts of their navies. Also, 64 nations signed the Kellogg-Briand Treaty promising to give up war as an instrument of foreign policy.

    4. He made poor choices, which brought incidents of bribery and corruption such as the Teapot Dome Scandal and Elk Hills.

    5. The business boom was stimulated by a rise in productivity and by the growth of buying on credit.


Alive 26 understanding postwar tensions1
Alive! 26 the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa. - Understanding Postwar Tensions

  • Rising economic, political, and social tensions marked the years just after World War I. This tense atmosphere affected the murder trial of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti. Both men were sentenced to death, despite weak evidence. Some Americans saw Sacco and Vanzetti as victims of prejudice against immigrants and radicals.

  • Recession A poorly planned demobilization resulted in an economic recession after World War I. As unemployment rose, living standards for all but the richest Americans declined.

  • Labor unrest Unions staged thousands of strikes for better wages and working conditions. Despite these efforts, unions began to lose strength, and their membership declined.

  • Red Scare Fear of socialists, communists, and anarchists fueled the Red Scare. Attorney General Mitchell Palmer led raids against suspected subversives, often violating their civil liberties.

  • Immigration restriction Congress responded to anti-immigrant pressure by restricting immigration. A quota system also limited the number of immigrants from each country.

  • Back-to-Africa movement African Americans were disappointed that their service to the country in World War I did not reduce racial prejudice. Marcus Garvey's Back-to-Africa movement appealed to blacks who had given up hope for equality in the United States.

  • Discrimination Nativism surged in the postwar years. A revived Ku Klux Klan targeted blacks, immigrants, Jews, and Catholics as un-American. The Anti-Defamation League began in response to anti-Semitism. The American Civil Liberties Union formed to protect freedom of speech.


America’s the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa. Postwar Tensions

Groups READ & WRITE about Causes and Effects (Per. 1 & 3 ONLY)

ALL periods review student NOTES…ADD details! Questions?

http://positivelypassionateaboutteaching.blogspot.com/2013/10/cause-effect-song-video.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Tdr5ylzmG8


Causes of Economic Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

Effects of Economic Problems


Causes of Economic Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

• The economy had been centered around war production.

• The government had no plans for demobilization.

• Overnight, the federal government canceled its

wartime contracts.

• The army discharged nearly 4 million veterans, flooding the labor market.

Effects of Economic Problems

  • Hundreds of factories closed.

    • Millions of Americans were thrown out of work.

    • The standard of living decreased.

    • The economy lapsed into recession.

    • Crime increased.


Causes of Labor Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

Effects of Labor Problems


Causes of Labor Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

  • The federal government no longer encouraged good

    labor relations.

    • Corporations reduced wages.

    • Corporations paid less attention to employee safety.

    • The workday increased to 12 hours.

Effects of Labor Problems

• Many Americans joined unions for the first time.

• Strikes erupted across the country.

• Supreme Court decisions diminished the power of

unions.

• Workers lost economic ground.


Causes of Political Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

Effects of Political Problems


Causes of Political Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

• In April 1919, authorities discovered 36 bombs and

blamed them on radicalism.

• Americans feared radical groups such as socialists, communists, and anarchists.

• In June 1919, eight bombs went off simultaneously in

eight cities, one of them targeting Attorney General

Mitchell Palmer.

Effects of Political Problems

• Attorney General Palmer launched the Red Scare, a campaign against subversives.

• During the Palmer Raids, homes and businesses were raided and thousands of radicals were arrested.

• Some 30 states passed sedition laws.

• Subversive books were removed from libraries.

• Mobs attacked suspected radicals.

• The civil liberties of citizens were violated.


Causes of Social Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

Effects of Social Problems


Causes of Social Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

• Immigration to the United States increased during the early postwar period.

• Many new immigrants were from southern and eastern Europe.

• Nativists called for restrictions in immigration.

• Union members favored tighter immigration laws.

Effects of Social Problems

• The Emergency Immigration Act of 1921 instituted a quota system.

• The Immigration Act of 1924 further limited immigration from southern and eastern Europe and banned immigration from Asia.

• The Ku Klux Klan was revived and used violence to intimidate targeted groups.

• The Klan openly marched in major cities to show their strength and endorse political candidates.

• The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) was

created to protect the freedom of speech for all

people.

• The ACLU took on challenging cases, such as the Sacco and Vanzetti case.


Causes of Racial & Religious Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

Effects of Racial & Religious Problems


Causes of Racial & Religious Problems the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

• Asian immigrants faced severe legal discrimination.

• Some states prohibited Asian immigrants from owning land and marrying whites.

• African Americans faced continuing racism.

• African American veterans had trouble finding employment.

• Lynching made a comeback in the South.

• Anti-Semitism continued during the postwar period.

• Catholics were targets of religious prejudice.

Effects of Racial & Religious Problems

• Tensions between whites and blacks erupted into nationwide race riots in the summer of 1919.

• Marcus Garvey created the Back-to-Africa movement, urging African Americans to leave the racist society of the United States.

• The Anti-Defamation League was created to fight for an end to anti-Semitism.


A the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa. hotly protested criminal trial, held from 1920 to 1927, in which Italian immigrants Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were convicted of robbing and murdering two men and sentenced to death; many people believed that the trial was unfair and that the defendants were prosecuted because they were anarchists, not because they were guilty.

Sacco and Vanzetti


You be the judge1
You be the “judge!” the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

Reasons they may be NOT guilty?

Reasons they do NOT deserve a retrial or freedom?


Preparing for sacco vanzetti trial simulation
Preparing for Sacco & Vanzetti “trial simulation” the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

  • Students they will now determine the fate of Sacco and Vanzetti by participating in a clemency hearing before Governor Alvan Fuller and the Lowell Committee.

  • Students work with their groups to prepare the responses to the questions on their Role Cards.

  • Students in the Lowell Committee place their desks in the front of the room (next Tuesday?) so they can see all the groups.


Act it out
“Act-it-out” the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.

  • Groups with Role Cards 2–7 choose one person to testify for their group.

  • Students in the Lowell Committee begin the hearing by following the instructions on Role Card 1.

  • After all groups have testified, project Bartolomeo Vanzetti Testifies (Visual 26E in print materials) and play the audio, “Testimony of Bartolomeo Vanzetti.”

  • Give the Lowell Committee a few minutes to vote on whether Sacco and Vanzetti should be granted clemency.

  • Then have Governor Fuller present the verdict to the class by following the instructions on Role Card 1. (Note: Keep the visual projected with the lights on during the act-it-out.)


The lowell committee
The Lowell Committee the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.


American civil liberties union
American Civil Liberties Union the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.


Nativists
Nativists the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.


Industrial workers of the world
Industrial Workers of the World the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.


Plymouth cordage company
Plymouth Cordage Company the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.


East boston anarchists organization
East Boston Anarchists Organization the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa.


Unit iii 1920s great depression and new deal
Unit III the Americas. Everywhere he went, he saw discrimination against blacks and the need to restore black pride in people of African heritage. “Up, you mighty race,” he told his followers. “You can accomplish what you will.” In 1920, while addressing a crowd of 25,000 in New York City, he outlined a plan to build a new black nation in Africa. 1920s, Great Depression, and New Deal

Enduring UnderstandingsStudents will understand that…

Cultural patterns established between the world wars are still today.

Conflict occurs when people perceive that values and culture are threatened by modern .

Economic excess and the unequal distributions of wealth can lead to in society.

Liberals and Conservatives have different beliefs about individual and the proper role of the

As a result of the New Deal, the United States government took on responsibilities for promoting the general .

relevant

traditional

changes

instability

responsibility

government

greater

welfare


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