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Slavery in the 1800\'s. By Matthew Magliocca Period 7. lincolnandslavery.com  -  480 × 387  -  Search by image Slavery-009.jpg. Number of Slaves in the South in the 1800\'s . Approximately 4.5 million slaves were working in s outhern plantations in the early to mid-1800’s.

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slavery in the 1800 s

Slavery in the 1800\'s

By Matthew Magliocca

Period 7

lincolnandslavery.com - 480 × 387 - Search by imageSlavery-009.jpg

slide2

Number of Slaves in the South in the 1800\'s

  • Approximately 4.5 million slaves were working in southern plantations in the early to mid-1800’s.
  • 1/3 of the southern population in the 1800’s were slaves.
slide3

Types of Slaves in the 1800\'s

  • Field slaves – They were transatlantic slaves who worked in the plantation fields.
  • House slaves – They worked and lived in the house of the slave owner.

Field slaves

House slaves

liberty-11th-english.liberty-charter.groupfusion.net - 400 × 311 - Search by image

field slaves job
Field slaves: Job
  • They commonly picked cotton, sugar, rice, and tobacco.
  • They worked in the fields from sunrise to sunset.
  • Most field slaves got Sundays off and part of Saturday off.
  • If a field slave did not work up to the expectations of their slave owner, they were either beaten or killed.
field slaves housing meals
Field slaves: Housing/Meals
  • Field slaves generally shared a one room cabin with their family.
  • Field slaves were given weekly rations of food by their master.
  • Their food options included some meat, corn meal, and flour.
field slaves women
Field slaves: Women
  • Women worked the same amount of time as the men.
  • The women did the same jobs as the men.
  • If a woman was pregnant, they worked until their child was born.
  • Women wore long dresses in the summer. During the winter, they wore a shawl and pantalettes.
field slaves children
Field slaves: Children
  • At about the age of twelve, the work of children slaves was about the same as adults.
  • Field slave children received little to no clothing until they reached the age of puberty.
field slaves punishments
Field slaves: Punishments
  • If a field slave was caught doing something that they should not have been doing by their slave owner, they would only be punished for the day of their crime.
  • A punishment that a field slave could have received was getting whipped, being put in chains, not getting fed for the day, etc.

Punishments 

house slaves job
House slaves: Job
  • House slaves cleaned, cooked, served meals, and took care of the children.
  • They worked all 7 days of the week.
  • The job of a house slave was much harder than it seemed.

House slaves were very hard working servants!

house slaves housing meals clothing
House slaves: Housing/Meals/Clothing
  • House slaves lived in attics, closets, or corners in the house of their owner.
  • They had better food than field slaves.
  • House slaves were dressed more modestly with the help from their master.
house slaves education
House slaves: Education
  • Although it was illegal in the 1800’s to educate slaves, some house slaves would be educated by the woman in the family that held them enslaved.

liberty-11th-english.liberty-charter.groupfusion.net - 400 × 311 - Search by image

house slaves punishments
House slaves: Punishments
  • If a house slave was caught doing something that they should not have been doing by their slave owner, they could be punished for a possibility of months.
  • A punishment that a house slave could have received was getting whipped, being put in chains, not getting fed for the day, etc.

Punishments 

slaves family separations
Slaves: Family Separations
  • Many families in the 1800’s were separated because of slavery.
  • Families were separated from the transportation to the southern plantations.
  • Families were also separated by their slave owners splitting members of the family up.

Families were

split up 

video about slavery
Video about Slavery

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQOtAyNDwGI

Being a slave

was terrible!!!

adventures of huckleberry finn jim
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Jim
  • In “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” the character Jim is depicted as a house slave.
  • His owner was Miss Watson.
  • Whenever Jim found out that Miss Watson was going to sell him down the river for $800, Jim decided to run away in the novel with Huck Finn.
adventures of huckleberry finn jim1
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Jim
  • Closer to the end of the novel, a convict pretending to be a king sold Jim out to a man for $40.
  • Huck Finn then tried to retrieve Jim back with some help from Tom Sawyer.

Picture of Huck Finn & Jim

adventures of huckleberry finn jim2
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Jim
  • Miss. Watson died, setting Jim free in her will. During this time, Jim was already free three months ago.

Quote

by

Tom

Sawyer

"They hain\'t no RIGHT to shut him up! SHOVE!—and don\'t you lose a minute. Turn him loose! He ain\'t no slave; he\'s as free as any cretur that walks this earth!"

mark twain personal experiences
Mark Twain: Personal Experiences
  • Mark Twain grew up in Missouri.
  • His uncle owned 20 slaves.
  • Mark Twain witnessed the practice of slavery whenever he spent summers at his uncle’s home.
  • He once witnessed the death of a slave in his home town of Hannibal by a slave owner.
  • He disagreed strongly with slavery.
mark twain adventures of huckleberry finn
Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Mark Twain connects slavery through the main character Jim, even though he never directly addresses the issue of slavery until the end of the novel.
  • Through Huck and Jim’s journey down the river, Jim strongly cares for and protects Huck, not as a slave, but as a pal.
  • Mark Twain depicts this in the novel to make readers feel sorry for Jim and outrage at the horrible society that has held him enslaved.
mark twain adventures of huckleberry finn1
Mark Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Mark Twain references to slavery throughout the novel by using satire.
  • An example of Mark Twain using satire in the novel can be demonstrated through Miss Watson.
why is this important
Why is this important?
  • It is important to understand what slavery was like during the time period of when the novel took place to understand how slaves were treated.
  • This is an important thing to understand the novel because if a person understands how slaves were treated in the 1800’s, the person should comprehend how Jim’s life was and how he felt.
works cited
Works Cited

Chevywheeler. “Slavery and Plantations." Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 01 November 2009. Web. 7 December 2013.

Clehman, Kylie. “Slaves-in-Field.” Photograph. Wikipedia. 16 May 2011. Web. 6 December 2013.

Filteau, Jerry. “Child Slavery.” Photograph. NCROnline. 10 January 2012. Web. 7 December 2013.

Jones, Tom. “Chalkboard Joke.” Photograph. WTTW. 13 April 2011. Web. 6 December 2013.

works cited1
Works Cited

Lombardi, Esther. “Mark Twain – Slavery views.” Classiclit.about.com. About. 02 February 2012. Web. 8 December. 2013.

Smith, Shelby. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Study Guide: Map of Huckleberry Finn." GradeSaver.com. GradeSaver. 09 April 2006. Web. 7 December 2013.

Smith, Shelby. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Themes." GradeSaver.com. GradeSaver. 09 April 2006. Web. 7 December 2013.

StudyMode Editors. “The Life of a Slave in the 1800’s.” StudyMode.com. StudyMode. 11 November 2012. Web. 4 December. 2013.

works cited2
Works Cited

SparkNotes Editors. “SparkNote on The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” SparkNotes.com. SparkNotes LLC. 2002. Web. 4 Dec. 2013.

Twain, Mark. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Mineola: Dover Thrift, 1994. Print.

Unknown. “Myths-slavery.” Photograph. Wikipedia. 3 February 2012. Web. 7 December 2013.

Unknown. “Huckleberry Finn.” Photograph. Comicsgrinder. 28 May 2012. Web. 8 December 2013.

works cited3
Works Cited

Unknown. “The Working Conditions of House Slaves.” Photograph. Glogster. 13 April 2011. Web. 6 December 2013.

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