the importance of skills to the future of the sector trustees can and should take the lead
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The importance of skills to the future of the sector. Trustees can and should take the lead. Introduction. Does the sector “get” the importance of investing in its people? What are the skills needs and gaps, with a focus on the skills for the future?

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the importance of skills to the future of the sector trustees can and should take the lead

The importance of skills to the future of the sector.Trustees can and should take the lead

introduction
Introduction

Does the sector “get” the importance of investing in its people?

What are the skills needs and gaps, with a focus on the skills for the future?

Current initiatives to address the skills needs

The responsibilities of Trustees to exercise leadership in this context

what s the current picture is there a problem
What’s the current picture? Is there a problem?

In 2011 55% of organisations had a training plan, 56% had a training budget

18% of organisations provided no training at all

Only 59% of those who provided training provided it for all grades of staff. Managers are significantly morel likely to receive training than other staff

The skills gaps most commonly reported by employers were for admin/clerical staff and for managers

The sector has higher levels of part-time employment than other sectors, and average pay is round £80pw lower than the other sectors

Employees are highly qualified, with 38% holding degree level qualifications, and 70% holding a Level 3 qualification

All data from 2013 UK Voluntary Sector Workforce Almanac

Only 7% of voluntary sector employers have Apprenticeships compared to the UK average of 9%

A recent CIPD survey estimated that the median average costs (advertising costs, agency or search fees) per hire in non-profits is £875 (or £4,500 for senior employees). Another recent CIPD survey shows that the median training budget per employee was £283 (a fall from £349 per employee in 2011). This might suggest that the average costs of recruitment are three times as large as the average costs of training an employee.

so is there a problem some possibly contentious assertions
So is there a problem? Some possibly contentious assertions

There is investment in people development but it is too often not aligned to organisational strategy for the next 5 years/ 10 years

The growth of project funding has exacerbated this by encouraging the recruitment of the expertise that is needed now over securing the expertise that will be needed in future

There is no strategic view on the relationship between spend ing on recruitment vs spending on the development of existing staff

The right sort of training and development may not be sufficiently accessible

The sector has an ageing workforce and does too little to attract and employ young people

Talented people with a commitment to social action still want a career

Governance is one of the most significant areas of a skills deficit and where there is least attention paid to investing in skills development

what are the skills needs and skills gaps a view from marsh review 2013
What are the skills needs and skills gaps?A view from Marsh Review 2013

Headline deficits are enterprise skills; digital fluency; leadership skills; governance; skills for collaboration and working in partnership

Others:

Need to do more to develop aspiring leaders/ middle managers. This is principally the responsibility of established leaders. Need coaching and mentoring skills as a standard

Need to create more entry points to the sector that are not internships / where is the strategic approach to Apprenticeships?

Need more brokerage of skills-sharing relationships / skilled volunteering

Need to do more to promote the sector as a career of choice to talented people, in particular talented young people

skills deficits and governance more from the marsh review
Skills deficits and governanceMore from the Marsh Review

Governance practice has not kept pace with the changing context for charities and voluntary organisations. It is therefore an area of significant skills deficit. “being willing and committed to the cause are important but no longer enough”

There is a problem of diversity

There is a deficit of digital awareness at governance level

There is a problem of attitude to risk and ability to assess and manage risk in a more enterprising environment for the sector. Too many Trustees are too risk averse.

It is a problem of both recruitment and development

There is not a problem of a lack of support

The key problem is that many organisations are unwilling to invest in a significant way in their Boards development

some current and innovative initiatives
Some current and innovative initiatives

Skills Effect’s work

The Skills Platform www.skillsplatform.org.uk

Skills Clubs

Other activity

CharityWorks graduate trainee scheme

Institute for Chairs

Uprising

Need a better way of knowing about, joining up and learning from other activity – could the Skills Platform Shout Outs provide this?

so what are the responsibilities of trustees in relation to skills
So what are the responsibilities of Trustees in relation to skills?

Exercise leadership

Demonstrate and articulate what good leadership means in the sector

Encourage networks of leadership development

Ask the right sort of questions / have greater expectations with regard to organisational and people development

E.g. Do we have a training plan? Have we conducted a training needs analysis? Is our training activity linked to our strategic plan? Are we spending money on recruitment when it could be better invested in development of our existing people?

Protect the training / staff development budget. See it as an investment not a cost

Encourage innovation in relation to development. Not everything has to cost a lot of money

Invest in their own development. Conduct Board self-assessment and skills audit / use these to inform a development plan and a recruitment strategy/ develop a role description for Trustees

There is a real cost to poor decisions

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