What is an association what is our role
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What Is An Association & What Is Our Role?. Lisa Funk, CHAE 2010-2011 HFTP Global Vice President Frank I. Wolfe, CAE HFTP CEO. Association. A group of people who voluntarily come together to solve common problems, meet common needs and accomplish common goals. An Association’s DNA.

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What is an association what is our role

What Is An Association & What Is Our Role?

Lisa Funk, CHAE

2010-2011 HFTP Global Vice President

Frank I. Wolfe, CAE

HFTP CEO


Association

Association

A group of people who voluntarily come together to solve common problems, meet common needs and accomplish common goals.


An association s dna

An Association’s DNA

What makes associations unique is that the same populations are:

the owners,

the customers, and

the workforce of the organization.


An association s dna1

An Association’s DNA

As a chapter officer:

What are some examples of the best project that your chapter has embarked upon during the last 24 months and what made it successful?


An association s dna2

An Association’s DNA

As a chapter officer:

What are some examples of the worst project that your chapter has embarked upon during the last 24 months and what made it Unsuccessful?


What is an association what is our role

8 STAGES IN THE LIFE OF AN ASSOCIATIONAdapted from JJ Cribben, Kimberly Miles. LEADERSHIP: The Organizational Lifecycle

CONCEPTION:A group of people see an advantage to voluntarily coming

together to start an association.

INFANCY:The founders are still in charge as the organization struggles to survive. Every job requires more work than the founders can do.

PUBERTY:The organization grows steadily, but suffers awkwardness in its dealings with outsiders and with internal coordination. Entrepreneurial skills are gradually replaced by more professional management techniques and skills.

YOUNG ADULTHOOD:Accepted management practices are implemented including formalized personnel practices. The beginnings of bureaucracy and internal politics are evident.

ADULTHOOD:The organization is mastering its environment and serving the needs of its members. Management is peaking and prepares to expand by entering new areas of service and/or new functions.

LATE ADULTHOOD:The excitement of the organization has diminished. The membership will not support innovation. A complacent atmosphere lacking any sense of urgency or zeal prevails.

OLD AGE:The organization is losing its ability to cope with its environment and serve the real needs of its members. Managers and leaders bicker, and internal control is lacking. All of the sudden things seem to come apart and few people seem to care.


Why people behave the way they do

Why People Behave The Way They Do

What is perceived is.

Perceptions are based on personally available information.

In the absence of information we assume.

Behavior, no matter how crazy, has a logical basis.


The distinguishing value proposition of the 21 st century association

The Distinguishing Value Proposition of the 21st Century Association

Commitment:

Consistent and organized focus on important things of high value that require coherent effort over time.

What does this mean in your association?

Members Actual Experience

“Brand”

Content:

Advocacy- effective clout that influences the beliefs and behaviors of others that affect things that are significant to me; Knowledge – insight that enables me to be successful at things that really matter to me.

Community: Enjoyable shared experience that makes me feel better about myself and my place in the world.

What does this mean in your association?

What does this mean in your association?


What is an association what is our role

Value Driven Strategy

A Core Competency Of The Enterprise

A Critical & Continuing Member

Need

“Sweet Spot”

A Supportable Response


What will earn engagement from members

What Will Earn Engagement From Members

Working on things that matter to them.

Demonstrating that the work is making a positive difference.

Providing an enjoyable opportunity for involvement


Involving members today

Involving Members Today

What has NOT changed…

Involvement leads to member retention.

Most people become involved because they are asked.

Most people that are asked cannot say “no”.

Most people still appreciate face-to-face interaction.

Most people appreciate personal and/or professional recognition.


Involving members today1

Involving Members Today

What has changed…

The amount of time per involvement opportunity has declined.

The competition for involvement has expanded.

The preference toward project-based involvement vs position-based involvement has increased.

The comfort level with virtual involvement is growing.


What is an association what is our role

Strategies:

At the organizational level: Increase the number of task level opportunities since that is the kind of opportunity preferred by the greatest number of the interested, but unengaged.

2-5%

Leaders

Doers

10-15%

Do Somethingers

15-20%

Belongers

60-80%


What is an association what is our role

Organizational Chart

MEMBERS


What is an association what is our role

Organizational Chart

CHAPTERS


What is an association what is our role

Organizational Chart

BOARD OF DIRECTORS


What is an association what is our role

MEMBER WANTS

MEMBER NEEDS

BOD WANTS AND NEEDS

STAKEHOLDER WANTS

FINANCIAL WANTS AND NEEDS

INDUSTRY NEEDS


What is an association what is our role

2011 Executive Committee


What is an association what is our role

MEMBER WANTS

MEMBER NEEDS

STAKEHOLDER WANTS

INDUSTRY NEEDS


What is an association what is our role

Organizational Chart

Frank Wolfe, CAE

Thomas Atzenhofer, CPA

Lucinda Hart, CAE

Bryan Wood

Eliza Selig

Jennifer Lee

Steven Stout, CAE

Lillian Lack

Gary Bourque

Katy Walterscheidt

Celina Mendieta

Linnet Baskett

Fritz Johnson

Sara Bailiff

Jim Davis

Jan Dodson

Dailey Lewis

Wendy Winnett

Brigitte Davis

10/4/2011


Hftp global strategic plan

HFTP Global Strategic Plan

Core Purpose:

To lead and advance the hospitality profession by providing a forum for continuous learning

and knowledge sharing.


Global strategies and alliances

Global Strategiesand Alliances

American Hotel and Lodging Association

Washington, DC, USA


Global strategies and alliances1

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Caribbean Hotel & Tourism Association

San Juan, Puerto Rico


Global strategies and alliances2

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Club Managers Association of America

Washington, DC, USA


Global strategies and alliances3

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Hsyndicate, Inc.

Maastricht, The Netherlands


Global strategies and alliances4

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Hospitality Upgrade Magazine

(Siegel Communications)

Atlanta, Georgia, USA


Global strategies and alliances5

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Hospitality Asset Managers Association

N. Scituate, MA, USA


Global strategies and alliances6

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Hong Kong Controllers and Accountants Association

Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China


Global strategies and alliances7

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Hospitality Finance, Revenue and IT Professionals Association

(formerly British Association of Hospitality Accountants)

London, England, U.K.


Global strategies and alliances8

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Hospitality Industry Technology Strategic Initiatives Council

Austin, Texas, USA


Global strategies and alliances9

Global Strategiesand Alliances

Hotel Technology Next Generation

Chicago, IL, USA


Global strategies and alliances10

Global Strategiesand Alliances

International Hotel & Restaurant Association

Geneva, Switzerland


Global strategies and alliances11

Global Strategiesand Alliances

International Spa Association

Lexington, KY, USA


Global committees 2011 2012

Global Committees 2011 - 2012

HITEC Advisory Council

Chair – Allison Morris, CHTP

Vice Chair – Ken Barnes

Education Advisory Council

Chair – Arlene Ramirez, MBA, CHE, CHAE

Vice Chair – Cathy Hill, CHAE

Leadership Summit Advisory Council

Chair – Rosemarie Gilchrist, CHAE

Vice Chair – Joe Romano, CHAE

Certification Advisory Council

Chair – Mick Nissen, CHAE, CHTP

Communications Editorial Advisory Council

Chair – Robert Salmore, CHAE, CPA

Social Media Advisory Council

Chair – Esther Fullen


Global committees 2011 20121

Global Committees 2011 - 2012

International Evaluation Council

Chair – Ralph Miller, CA, CBV, CHA, CHAE

Vice Chair – Neil Foster, CCNA, MBA, CHTP

PCI Compliance Task Force

Chair – Jeremy Rock, CHTP

Paragon Award Selection Committee

Chair - Thomas Smith, CHAE

International Hospitality Technology Hall of Fame Award Selection Committee

Chair – Lisa Funk, CHAE

HFTP Nominating Committee

Chair – Thomas Smith, CHAE


Hftp ratios vs asae benchmarks

HFTP Ratios vs. ASAE Benchmarks

Survey certified to have a confidence level of >95%

Association benchmarks are paired within “like” associations. For example, benchmarks here are for 501(c)6 individual membership groups with annual revenues between 5M and 10M.

Comp set was taken from 103 completed surveys


Net profitability percentage of total revenue

Net Profitability(Percentage of Total Revenue)

Benchmark: 5.6% of Total Revenue

2009 Actual: 6.56%

2010 Forecast: 3.05%

2011 Budget: -4.72%


Target reserve ratios net assets as a of annual revenue

Target Reserve Ratios(Net Assets as a % of Annual Revenue)

ASAE Benchmark – 55% of gross revenue

2009 Actual – 66%

2010 Forecast – 76%

2011 Budget – 78%


Revenue sources

Revenue Sources


The amount of revenue generated per hftp staff member

The Amount of Revenue Generated per HFTP Staff Member

ASAE Benchmark - $226,432 Revenue Generated Per Staff Member

2009 Actual - $256,464 Revenue Generated Per Staff Member

2010 Forecast - $267,299 Revenue Generated Per Staff Member

2011 Budget - $267,737 Revenue Generated Per Staff Member


Revenues expenses in thousands

Revenues & Expenses(in thousands)


Personnel costs

Personnel Costs

ASAE Benchmark – 27.5% of Annual Revenue

2009 Actual – 26.56% of Annual Revenue

2010 Forecast – 26.49% of Annual Revenue

2011 Budget –27.19% of Annual Revenue


What is an association what is our role

BENEFIT COSTS(Includes Retirement, Prof. Development, LTD, Health Insurance, Staff Holiday Party and Picnic, & Dues/Subscriptions)

ASAE Benchmark – 5.0% of Annual Revenue

2009 Actual – 3.69% of Annual Revenue

2010 Forecast – 4.36% of Annual Revenue

2011 Budget – 4.78% of Annual Revenue


Operational costs

Operational Costs


Governance costs includes ec bod council meetings leadership stipends and task force expenses

Governance Costs(Includes EC, BOD, Council Meetings, Leadership & Stipends, and Task Force Expenses)

ASAE Benchmark – 3.5% of Annual Revenue

2009 Actual – 5.47% of Annual Revenue

2010 Forecast – 6.49% of Annual Revenue

2011 Budget – 8.32% of Annual Revenue


Membership services cost as a percentage of revenue

Membership Services Cost(As a Percentage of Revenue)

ASAE Benchmark – 7.7%

2009 Actual – 18.70%

2010 Forecast – 18.17%

2011 Budget – 18.90%


Meeting expenses food cost bars entertainment as a of revenue

Meeting Expenses(Food Cost, Bars, Entertainment as a % of Revenue)

ASAE Benchmark – 3.9%

2009 Actual – 7.77%

2010 Forecast – 8.01%

2011 Budget – 6.62%


Meeting expenses speaker fees expenses as a of total revenue

Meeting Expenses(Speaker Fees & Expenses as a % of Total Revenue)

ASAE Benchmark – 1.0%

2009 Actual – 3.78%

2010 Forecast – 4.31%

2011 Budget – 5.37%


Meeting expenses av as a of overall revenue

Meeting Expenses(AV as a % of Overall Revenue)

ASAE Benchmark – 1.5%

2009 Actual – 3.33%

2010 Forecast – 3.06%

2011 Budget – 2.91%


Meeting expenses facilities as a of total revenue

Meeting Expenses(Facilities as a % of Total Revenue)

ASAE Benchmark1.50%

2009 Actual 2.94%

2010 Forecast2.25%

2011 Budget2.19%


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