Censorship in yal witty title
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Censorship in YAL: Witty Title. Mindy M. Wara Leah Schutte. The Difference Between Challenged and Banned Books.

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Censorship in YAL: Witty Title

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Censorship in yal witty title

Censorship in YAL:Witty Title

Mindy M. Wara

Leah Schutte


The difference between challenged and banned books

The Difference Between Challenged and Banned Books

  • A challenge is an attempt to remove or restrict materials, based upon the objections of a person or group.  Due to the commitment of librarians, teachers, parents, students and other concerned citizens, most challenges are unsuccessful and most materials are retained in the school curriculum or library collection.

  • A banning is the removal of those materials.  http://www.gltech.org/library/AboutBannedChallengedBooks.htm


Challenging books

Challenging Books


Frequently challenged books

Frequently Challenged Books

  • To Kill a Mockingbird

  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Fin

  • The Great Gatsby

  • Of Mice and Men

  • Harry Potter

  • Lord of the Rings

  • Twilight

  • Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

  • The Catcher and the Rye

  • The Grapes of Wrath

  • The Lord of the Flies

  • Animal Farmhttp://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/bannedbooksweek/ideasandresources/free_downloads/2010banned.pdf


Challenged books the hunger games

Challenged Books: The Hunger Games


How is a book challenged

How Is a Book Challenged?


How often are books challenged

How Often Are Books Challenged?


Why challenge a book

Why Challenge a Book?


Who challenges books

Who Challenges Books?


Censorship in yal witty title

http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/frequentlychallenged/challengesbytype/index.cfm


Ala terms and definitions

ALA Terms and Definitions

  • Expression of Concern – An inquiry that has judgmental overtones.

  • Oral Complaint – An oral challenge to the presence and/or appropriateness of the material in question.

  • Written Complaint – A formal, written complaint filed with the institution (library, school, etc.), challenging the presence and/or appropriateness of specific material.

  • Public Attack – A publicly disseminated statement challenging the value of the material, presented to the media and/or others outside the institutional organization in order to gain in public support for further action.

  • Censorship – A change in the access status of material, based on the content or the work and made by a governing authority of its representatives. Such changes include exclusion, restriction, removal, or age/grade level changes.http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/aboutbannedbooks/termsanddefinitions/index.cfm


What do other teachers think

What Do Other Teachers Think?


What do students think about censorship

What Do Students Think about Censorship?


Censorship student survey results

Censorship Student Survey Results

Question 1: How much of a role does your school (teachers, the OASD, etc.) have on what you read?


Censorship student survey results1

Censorship Student Survey Results

Question 2: How often do your parents attempt to influence your book choices? How often does this affect your book choices (honestly, how often do you listen?)


Censorship student survey results2

Censorship Student Survey Results

Question 3: What “banned books” have you read (in class or on your own)?


Censorship student survey results3

Censorship Student Survey Results

Question 4: Should certain books be banned? Why or why not? Who should or should not make the decision what is and is not banned?


Censorship student survey results4

Censorship Student Survey Results

Question 4a: If yes, list at least three reasons you believe a book should be banned.


Censorship student survey results5

Censorship Student Survey Results

Question 4b: If no, list at least three reasons you believe books should not be banned.


Censorship student survey results6

Censorship Student Survey Results

Question 5: Pertaining to your opinion from question 4, list some books you think should be banned, or list some books you think should not be banned.


Remember banned book week is september 24 october 1 2011

Remember: Banned Book Week is September 24 – October 1, 2011

“Banned Books Week (BBW) is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read and the importance of the First Amendment… Imagine how many more books might be challenged—and possibly banned or restricted—if librarians, teachers, and booksellers across the country did not use Banned Books Week each year to teach the importance of our First Amendment rights and the power of literature, and to draw attention to the danger that exists when restraints are imposed on the availability of information in a free society.”

http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/bannedbooksweek/index.cfm


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