The coming of independence unit 1 chapter 2 section 2
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The Coming of Independence Unit 1, Chapter 2, Section 2 . Starter (S5). The Declaration of Independence states that all men are endowed “with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

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The Coming of Independence Unit 1, Chapter 2, Section 2

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The coming of independence unit 1 chapter 2 section 2

The Coming of IndependenceUnit 1, Chapter 2, Section 2


Starter s5

Starter(S5)

  • The Declaration of Independence states that all men are endowed “with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

  • Assignment: Is this statement a fact or opinion? Explain your answer.


Notes quiz n1

Notes Quiz(N1)

  • 1. List the Characteristics of a State.

  • 2. Democracy comes in (2) versions. List them and explain the difference.

  • 3. What is a Oligarchy?

  • 4. The Free Enterprise system is base on (4) factors. List them.


Review

Review

  • Early Influences on American Government

  • Magna Carta

  • Parliament – Representative Gov’t

  • Petition of Right

  • The English Bill of Rights

  • Colonial Government

    • Royal, Proprietary, Charter


Georgia professional standard

Georgia Professional Standard

  • SSCG2: The Student will analyze the natural rights philosophy and the nature of government expressed in the Declaration of Independence.


Britain s colonial policies

Britain’s Colonial Policies

  • 1607 – Jamestown (first English settlement)

  • Britain and North America – distance a problem

  • Self-rule – a nice thing to get used to

  • Salutary Neglect


Growing colonial unity

Growing Colonial Unity

  • The Albany Plan: Plan proposed by B. Franklin in 1754, aimed to unite the 13 Colonies for trade, military, and other purposes; the plan was turned down by the colonies and the crown.

  • Stamp Act : 1765 – tax on stamps on all legal documents, business agreements, and newspapers. Viewed as taxation without representation.

  • Protest mounted: Boston Tea Party (1773)

  • Boycott of English goods.


First continental congress

First Continental Congress

  • Spring of 1774: Parliament reacted by passing the Intolerable Acts.

    • Colonies called for representative from every colony. All met in Philadelphia except Georgia.

    • Sent Declaration of Rights to George III asking for laws repeal

    • Ask all Colonies to refuse to trade will England


Second continental congress

Second Continental Congress

  • May 1775: “shot heard around the world” had been fired. The battles of Lexington and Concord had been fought.

  • All Colonies sent Representatives.

  • John Hancock chosen as President.

  • George Washington appointed CIC

  • Nations first national government (5 years)

    • Under Declaration of Independence until the Articles of Confederation was adopted in 1781

    • A unicameral Congress acted as both legislative and executive powers.


The declaration of independence

The Declaration of Independence

  • June 7, 1776: Resolved, That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent States.

  • July 4, 1776, 2nd Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence


The first state constitutions

The First State Constitutions

  • 1776 and 1776: Most states began to replace their royal charters with Constitutions

    • Shared the principles of Popular Sovereignty (government can exist only with the consent of the governed). Limited government, civil rights, and liberties and separation of powers and checks and balances.


Summary

Summary

  • Britain’s Colonial Policies

  • First Continental Congress

  • First Continental Congress

  • Second Continental Congress

  • The Declaration of Independence

  • The First State Constitutions


Activity

Activity

  • Word Bank: Sentence, Story or Song


Activity1

Activity

  • Primary Sources

  • Page 40 – 43 Read the Declaration of Independence

  • Page 43 Reviewing the Declaration

  • Complete Questions 1 - 8


Ticket out the door

Ticket out the Door

  • Explain the concept of Natural Rights.


Home work

Home Work

  • Read Unit 1, Chapter 2, Section 3

    • Page 47, Section 3 Assessment

    • Questions 1 - 4


Vocabulary word bank v2

Vocabulary Word Bank(V2)

1. Limited Government

2. Magna Carta

3. Petition of Right

4. Charter

5. Bicameral

6. Albany Plan of Union

7. Popular sovereignty

8. Articles of Confederation

9. Ratification

10. Boycott


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