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MATERI I I. PROPOSISI. Tautology and Contradiction. Definition A tautology is a statement form that is always true. A statement whose form is a tautology is a tautological statement. A contradiction is a statement form that is always false.

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materi i i

MATERI II

PROPOSISI

slide2

Tautology and Contradiction

Definition

A tautology is a statement

form that is always true.

A statement whose form is

a tautology is a tautological

statement.

A contradiction is a statement form that is always false.

A statement whose form is a contradiction is a contradictory statement.

slide3

Conditional Statements (Implication)

Definition

If p and q are statement variables,

the conditional of q by p is

"If p then q" or "p implies q" and is

denoted p→q. It is false when p is

true and q is false; otherwise it is

true.

slide4

The Contrapositive, Converse and Inverse of a Conditional Statement

  • Definition
  • Suppose a conditional statement of the form “If p then q” is given.
  • The contrapositive is “If ~q then ~p” (~q → ~p)
  • The converse is “If q then p“ (q → p)
  • The inverse is "If ~p then ~q" (~p → ~q)
slide5

Biconditional (Biimplication)

Definition

Given statement variables p and q,

the biconditional of p and q is "p if

and only if q" and is denoted p↔q.

It is true if both p and q have the

same truth values and is false if p

and q have opposite truth values.

The words if and only if are sometimes abbreviated iff.

slide6

Valid and Invalid Arguments

Definition

An argument is a sequence of statements (or proposition).

All statements (or proposition) in an argument except for the final one, are called premises (or assumptions or hypotheses).

The final statement or statement form is called the conclusion.

The symbol , which is read "therefore," is normally placed just before the conclusion.

To say that an argument is valid means that if the resulting premises are all true, then the conclusion is also true.

slide7

An Invalid Argument Form

Show that the following argument form is invalid.

slide8

A Valid Argument Form

Show that the following argument form is valid

exercises
Exercises

Use truth tables to determine whether the following argument forms are valid.

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