Three strategies for assessment in autonomous language learning
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Three strategies for assessment in autonomous language learning. Joan Jamieson, Northern Arizona University, USA & Carol A. Chapelle, Iowa State University, USA. Three Strategies. Adaptivity Feedback Self-assessment. An Adaptive Strategy.

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Three strategies for assessment in autonomous language learning

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Three strategies for assessment in autonomous language learning

Three strategies for assessment in autonomous language learning

Joan Jamieson, Northern Arizona University, USA

&

Carol A. Chapelle, Iowa State University, USA


Three strategies

Three Strategies

  • Adaptivity

  • Feedback

  • Self-assessment


An adaptive strategy

An Adaptive Strategy

  • Learner would benefit from more than one form of material

  • Computer should select appropriate form based on responses to questions


Overview of lea

Overview of LEA

Beginning Reading

Beginning Listening

Beginning Writing

Results &

Recommendations

Interest and Ability Finder

Intermediate Reading

Intermediate Listening

Intermediate Writing

Results &

Recommendations

Advanced Reading

Advanced Listening

Advanced Writing

Results &

Recommendations


The interest survey

The Interest Survey

  • Select test form

  • Select recommendations


Items on interest survey

Items on Interest Survey


Example strategies

Example Strategies


A feedback strategy

A Feedback Strategy

  • Learner benefits from total scores

  • Learner might benefit more from part scores


Example computing total score

Example Computing Total Score


Part scores reflect subskills

Part Scores Reflect Subskills

  • Tests are often made up of subskills

  • Each item can be coded according to subskill

  • Scores for subskills can be computed by including codes


Table of specifications

Table of Specifications


Tags for leo tests

Tags for LEO Tests

TAGWhat the TAG means

Llistening

LINlistening for information

LIDlistening for ideas

Ggrammar

G1grammar point 1

G2grammar point 2

G3grammar point 3

Sspeaking

Vvocabulary

Rreading

Ppronunciation

P1pronunciation point 1

P2pronunciation point 2


Tags in script for grammar section

Tags in Script for Grammar Section


Using tags with system variables

Using Tags with System Variables

  • “score” yields percentage correct

  • score (tag) yields percentage correct for any items with a given “tag”

  • score (G2) yields percentage correct of 2nd point of grammar—expressions for suggesting


Combining tags and system variables

Combining Tags and System Variables

score (L | G | V | S | P | R)

n/m1= “rawscore(LIN) / tqw(LIN)”

n/m2= “rawscore(LID) / tqw(LID)”

n/m3= “rawscore(G1) / tqw(G1)”

n/m4= “rawscore(G2) / tqw(G2)”

n/m5= “rawscore(G3) / tqw(G3)”


Mock up of progress report screen

Mock-up of Progress Report Screen

Progress Report

LEO 3 Test

Learner’s name:

Score: score (L | G | V | S | P | R)

Language areaNumber correct/number of items

Listening for informationn/m1

Listening for ideasn/m2

Grammar (point1*)n/m3

Grammar (point2*)n/m4

Grammar (point3*)n/m5


Screen shot of progress report

Screen Shot of Progress Report


Using tags to report scores

Using Tags to Report Scores


A self assessment strategy

A Self-Assessment Strategy

  • Learner may benefit by comparing his/her perspective of performance with score

  • Computer can collect self-confidence data along with performance data


Example of self confidence item

Example of Self-Confidence Item

Was your answer correct? How sure are you? Click a circle below.

Completely Not sure at all

sure


Superimposed self assessment item

Superimposed Self-Assessment Item

Was your answer correct? How sure are you? Click in a circle for each answer.

1.

2.

3.

Completely Not sure

sure at all


Computing average confidence tarone and yule 1989

Computing Average Confidence (Tarone and Yule, 1989)

Circle clicked 54 3 2 1 total average confidence

correct answers 205 3 2 0 294.52

incorrect answers 00 4 5 2 112.00

(20*5)+(5*4)+(3*3)+(2*2)+(0*1)/29 = 4.52

(4*3)+(5*2)+(2*0)/11 = 2.00

Tarone, E., & Yule, G. (1989). Focus on the language learner. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.


Computing self monitoring index

Computing Self-Monitoring Index

  • Derived by subtracting self-confidence rating on incorrect items from self-confidence rating on correct items:

    4.52 – 2.00 = 2.52

  • Index ranges in value from 4 to - 4

  • Messages could be provided instead of numbers


Self assessment superimposed onto progress report

Self-Assessment Superimposed onto Progress Report

Self-Assessment: You seem to be aware of your own ability. When you gave the correct answer, you were very sure you were correct. When you gave the wrong answer, you were not too sure you were correct.


Implementing self assessment

Implementing Self-Assessment

  • Tag self-assessment items <SA>

  • Save value of “rawscore (SA)” separately for correct and incorrect items:

    • IF ANSWER = 1 THEN SAOK = SAOK + rawscore (SA)

    • IF ANSWER = 0 THEN SANO = SANO + rawscore (SA)


Calculating average scores

Calculating Average Scores

  • AVGSAOK = SAOK / # CORRECT ITEMS

  • AVGSANO = SANO / # INCORRECT ITEMS

  • MONITORING INDEX = AVGSAOK-AVGSANO


Example of computing self assessment scores

Example of Computing Self-Assessment Scores


Three strategies for individualizing assessment

Three Strategies for Individualizing Assessment

  • Adapting level, content, and recommendations based on learner’s responses

  • Additional feedback in the form of diagnostic scores

  • Self-assessment to heighten learner’s metacognitive awareness


Three strategies for assessment in autonomous language learning1

Three strategies for assessment in autonomous language learning

Joan Jamieson, Northern Arizona University, USA

&

Carol A. Chapelle, Iowa State University, USA


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