Jay hendrick anatomy and physiology block 4
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Monkey Pox. Jay Hendrick Anatomy and Physiology Block 4. Monkeypox Information. Monkeypox is a viral disease that mainly occurs in central and western Africa.

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Jay Hendrick Anatomy and Physiology Block 4

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Jay hendrick anatomy and physiology block 4

MonkeyPox

Jay Hendrick

Anatomy and Physiology

Block 4


Monkeypox information

Monkeypox Information

  • Monkeypox is a viral disease that mainly occurs in central and western Africa.

  • It’s called Monkeypox because in 1958, when it was first discovered, laboratory monkeys were reported to have it. Scientists then ran tests on animals in Africa and discovered Monkeypox was found in an African squirrel.

  • Monkeypox is classified as a variola virus, which is also what smallpox is considered.


Causes

Causes

  • Monkeypox can be contracted from animals through being bitten by the infected creature, or by touching their rash, bodily fluids, or blood.

  • Monkeypox can be contracted from other humans through respiratory droplets, such as coughing and sneezing, or touching the sick person’s objects that have been infected.


Signs and symptoms

Signs and Symptoms

  • Symptoms that occur from contracting Monkeypox are similar to smallpox and include: swelling of the lymph nodes, fever, headaches, muscle aches, fatigue, and backaches. Most of these symptoms occur after twelve days of having the virus. Three days after a fever occurs, a rash appears. The rash then turns into raised bumps and fills with fluid. The bumps will scab over eventually and fall off. The whole recovery process ranges from two to four weeks.


Treatments cures and preventions

Treatments, Cures, and Preventions

  • Currently, there is no treatment for Monkeypox.

  • People who have been vaccinated for smallpox have a less chance of acquiring Monkeypox.

  • Gradually, the virus will be eliminated from your body.


Works cited

Works Cited

  • "CDC Monkeypox | What You Should Know About Monkeypox." Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Web. 13 Feb. 2012. <http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/monkeypox/factsheet2.htm>.

  • "Google Images." Google. Web. 13 Feb. 2012. <http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.allaboutwildlife.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/whaldenerEndoCapuch.jpg>.

  • "Google Images." Google. Web. 13 Feb. 2012. <http://www.google.com/imgres?q=monkeypox>.

  • "Google Images." Google. Web. 13 Feb. 2012. <http://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch>.

  • "Monkeypox." Illinois Department of Public Health Home Page. Web. 13 Feb. 2012. <http://www.idph.state.il.us/health/infect/monkeypox.htm>.

  • "WHO | Monkeypox." Web. 13 Feb. 2012. <http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs161/en/>.


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