To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time
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Goal:. To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time. Starter: “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.” What technique has Shakespeare used to describe the world and what does it mean?. Write your own metaphor for the world.

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To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Goal:

To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Starter:

“All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.”

What technique has Shakespeare used to describe the world and what does it mean?


Write your own metaphor for the world

Write your own metaphor for the world

  • For example:

    • All the world’’s a tree and the men and women are merely the leaves and branches.

  • Now it’s your turn!

  • All the world’s a


Reading

Reading

  • Read “Jacques” by Shakespeare from the play “As You Like It”

  • List the 7 ages of man

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziXqEX6AwKA

    All the world's a stage,And all the men and women merely players:They have their exits and their entrances;And one man in his time plays many parts,His acts being seven ages.


As you like it

‘As you like it’

At first the infant,Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.And then the whining school-boy, with his satchelAnd shining morning face, creeping like snailUnwillingly to school. And then the lover,Sighing like furnace, with a woeful balladMade to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,Seeking the bubble reputationEven in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,In fair round belly with good capon lined,With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,Full of wise saws and modern instances;And so he plays his part. The sixth age shiftsInto the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wideFor his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,Turning again toward childish treble, pipesAnd whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,That ends this strange eventful history,Is second childishness and mere oblivion,Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.


As you like it1

‘As you like it’

At first the infant,Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.And then the whining school-boy, with his satchelAnd shining morning face, creeping like snailUnwillingly to school. And then the lover,Sighing like furnace, with a woeful balladMade to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,Seeking the bubble reputationEven in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,In fair round belly with good capon lined,With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,Full of wise saws and modern instances;And so he plays his part. The sixth age shiftsInto the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wideFor his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,Turning again toward childish treble, pipesAnd whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,That ends this strange eventful history,Is second childishness and mere oblivion,Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.


Shakespeare s 7 ages of man

Shakespeare’s 7 Ages of Man

  • Infant

  • School boy

  • Lover

  • Soldier

  • Justice

  • Old man (slipper'd pantaloon)

  • Senility / death (second childishness and mere oblivion)


The seven ages of man today

The seven ages of man TODAY

  • Are the seven ages of man still the same today?

  • Write down what you think are the modern seven ages of man and complete the following table.


Modern animation

Modern Animation

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LwAsT76S84


To create a visual representation of the seven ages of man for display purposes

Goal:

To create a visual representation of the “Seven Ages of Man” for display purposes.

Talk for one minute to your partner about:

Shakespeare’s “Seven Ages of Man”

Your modern “Seven Ages of Man”


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Story-board the seven ages of man


Share your poster and explain your choices

Share your poster and explain your choices


Boagey

Boagey

  • Pronunciation and Insults


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

This speech is said by Lord Capulet to his daughter Juliet. She has refused to obey her father’s wishes. He wants her to marry a gentleman called Paris who she does not love.

Romeo and Juliet: Act 3 Scene 5

Hang thee, young baggage, disobedient wretch!I tell thee what: get thee to church a' Thursday,Or never after look me in the face.Speak not, reply not, do not answer me!My fingers itch. Wife, we scarce thought us blestThat God had lent us but this only child,But now I see this one is one too much,And that we have a curse in having her.Out on her, hilding!

Try to say the speech as if his anger is:

  • quiet and still

  • loud and aggressive


Goal to explore shakespeare s use of pronouns to create your own language

Goal: . To explore Shakespeare’s use of pronouns. To create your own language

Starter:

What is a pronoun?


A pronoun is

A pronoun is

  • A pronoun replaces a noun and makes a sentence less cumbersome and repetitive.

    • For example:

      • He, she, them, you, they.


Log onto your computer

Log onto your computer.

  • Access VLE 7R/En

  • Resources

  • Pronouns (link)

  • Read the fact sheets.

  • Complete the test.

  • Play the game

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/words/grammar/interestsentences/pronouns/quiz.shtml


Thou thine thee

Thou, thine, thee

  • Don’t get too hung up over Shakespeare’s use of thee, thy, thine and thou.

  • Although these words were used in Shakespeare’s times these words have now been replaced with words:

    • Thou, thine – you, yours

    • Thee - you (to a friend)


Here are some more words that you will come across

Here are some more words that you will come across.

canst - can hath - has

doth - does ist - is it

durst - dare to wilt - will

betwixt - between quoth- says

twain- two yon, yonder- there, over there


Read through list of words that you will come across

Read through list of words that you will come across.

  • Select four words from your list and write them into a modern sentence.


Inventing words

Inventing words

  • Shakespeare invented words to suit his writing, the tone and context of his plays.

  • For example, he invented a mock Russian in ‘All’s Well that Ends Well’

    Lord Dumaine: Throcamovousus, cargo, cargo, cargo

    Soldiers :Cargo, cargo, cargo, villianda par corbo, cargo


He also made up nonsense words that seemed to make sense in context

He also made up nonsense words that seemed to make sense in context.

  • For example:

    • Skimble-skamble, hugger-mugger, hurly burly, kickiewickie, michingmallecho


He made verbs out of adjectives

He made verbs out of adjectives

  • For example:

    • happies, bolds, gentle , pale

  • And making verbs out of adjectives:

    • ‘he childed as I fathered’


He added prefixes

He added prefixes

  • For example:

    • uncaught, unhair, undeaf, unfathered, unpeople, behowl, bespeak.


Now create your own

Now create your own!

  • Invent FOUR nonsense words.

    • Now write these words into TWO sentences.

  • Invent FOUR new words by adding prefixes.

    • Now write these words into TWO sentences.


Homework

Homework:

  • Write these sentences in 17th century English

    • Honestly, I think that your face has the look of a drawn out horse.

    • Go away! I have had enough of you two fighting.

    • Truly, I cannot drink this horrible orange juice.


Shakespeare and shakespeare s globe

Shakespeare and Shakespeare’s Globe


Horrible histories

Horrible Histories

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Amp_Pf-vQMI


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/famouspeople/william_shakespeare/


To familiarise myself with the plot of hamlet

To familiarise myself with the plot of Hamlet

  • Starter:

    “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.”

    What language device is used?

    What are its connotations/ what do you think this famous quotation from Hamlet means?


Hamlet plot

Hamlet plot

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english_literature/dramahamlet/


Bbc animation

BBC Animation

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j-S0M1PkNcQ&list=PLE2E5D997E00E171C

  • Watch the following and complete a 5-6 point summary (bullet point the ‘big ideas’)


Reading and performing the play

Reading and performing the play


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • http://www.slideshare.net/jvanengen/hamlet-lion-king-comparison


John marsden s hamlet

John Marsden’s Hamlet

Goal: to become familiar with the traditional plot of Hamlet


Starter what do the following have in common

Starter: what do the following have in common?


What do we know about

What do we know about….

HAMLET

SHAKESPEARE


Watch

Watch

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_AgDHC6jBE

How does Marsden describe Hamlet?

What genre is the novel?

What does Marsden want from his readers?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Hamlet: extraordinary character, passionate, intense, hard to understand, is he mad or simply pretending?

Genre: tragedy, romance, ghost story, thriller,


Reflection

Reflection

  • What have you learnt about Hamlet today?

  • Rate your understanding of the plot (1VL -5VH)


Goal to develop our understanding of characters

Goal to develop our understanding of characters

  • Starter: Do you believe in ghosts? Why/not


What distinction does hamlet make about belief in ghosts what does this reveal of his character

What distinction does Hamlet make about belief in ghosts? What does this reveal of his character?


False spring

“false spring”

  • What is a false spring? (think Tuesday)

  • What is significant about this?


What do we learn about claudius on page 10

What do we learn about Claudius on page 10?


Goal to continue to develop our understanding of characters

Goal: to continue to develop our understanding of characters

  • Starter: The door “whinged and groaned”

    Is an example of:

  • Simile

  • Metaphor

  • Personification


What senses are drawn on in the ghost scene

What senses are drawn on in the ghost scene?


21 22 24

21-22, 24

Hamlet’s Father

Killed by brother

dignified


Aim to continue developing our knowledge of characters

Aim: to continue developing our knowledge of characters

  • Starter:

  • What does red traditionally symbolise?

  • What does white traditionally symbolise?


What do we learn about polonius on page 31

What do we learn about Polonius on page 31?

  • Find a quotation


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Why do you think Marsden describes Ophelia as “in sunlight she was sunlight; in darkness she was shadow” (31)?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • How does Ophelia perceive Hamlet on page 40?


Reflection1

Reflection:

  • What have you learnt about the characters today?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Task

  • Drawing on the senses, create your own ghost scene.


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Goal:

  • Starter:

    Why would Hamlet’s mind be a “chaos of emotions”(44)?

    Thought-shower his emotions:

    Anxious

    Conflicted


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • Explain the symbolism:

    “A low heavy layer of dark clouds sat in the east, glooming the sky” (43)


Visualisation

Visualisation

  • Page 44.

    In what ways is Hamlet’s Father’s shadow split?

    Draw:

Comic character in pantomime, usually dressed in a costume of many colours and wearing a mask.


Page 44

Page 44

What is a continent?

Archipelago: a group of many islands


Imagery page 45

Imagery: Page 45

What do we learn about Hamlet and his father’s relationship?

How does Hamlet feel here?

“The charge his father had laid on him: the king had come back from death to rule his son, so that once again nothing existed in Hamlet’s life but the decrees of the father, one man using the boy to attack and destroy another man. It was a mammoth fighting a mammoth, using the boy as a weapon” (45)


What does hamlet realise

What does Hamlet realise?

  • “….he tasted the knowledge that he would not survive this. He felt his mind becoming paper, then torn-up paper, then burnt paper, then ashes, and he sensed the coming annihilation of his body” (45)


Character table

Character Table

  • Hamlet: “Alive and hopeless” (45)


Polonius page 46

Polonius Page 46

  • Find two quotations to add to your character table.

  • Why is Ophelia described as a “valuable broodmare”?


Why does ophelia want to fly

Why does Ophelia want to fly?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • Why the contrast between light and dark? (53)

  • What does Ophelia mean when she says, “can we live at all”? (53)

  • Explain Hamlet’s “to live or not to live…” (54)

  • Do you agree that “action is courage and reflection is cowardly”? (55) How does this relate to Hamlet?


Compare and contrast ophelia and hamlet

Compare and contrast Ophelia and Hamlet


Starter

Starter:

  • What is the difference between these two questions: “Do you believe in ghosts?” and “Do you believe ghosts”?


Chapter eleven

Chapter Eleven

  • What does page 62 reveal of Ophelia?

    Consider:

    “she disappeared into Hamlet”


Compare and contrast ophelia and hamlet1

Compare and contrast Ophelia and Hamlet


What have we learned

What have we learned?


Chapter fourteen

Chapter Fourteen

Explain the significance of “Hamlet [standing] in the shadows” (73)

What is Hamlet’s plan?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • Why can’t Hamlet “just enjoy life?” (90)


Homework chapter fifteen sixteen and seventeen

Homework: Chapter Fifteen, Sixteen and Seventeen

  • Imagine you watched the performance. Describe what you saw.

    Due Friday


To understand the term foreshadowing

To understand the term foreshadowing

  • Starter: Who is the serpent?

  • Note: the King’s cause of death was poison poured into his ear while asleep


Write this in your books

Write this in your books

  • Foreshadowing: Where we are given hints of what is to come.


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • ‘“Something is rotten in the state of Denmark” (102)

  • What is ‘rotten’?

  • What is the metaphorical precipice?


Explain what these quotations foreshadow

Explain what these quotations foreshadow

  • “Committed to an act that could not be recalled…Hamlet looked ready to precipitate a landslide, without a thought as to who might be buried in its path” (99)

  • “[Hamlet] felt that events were going to accelerate towards a terrible climax” (105)

  • “extreme darkness” (105)

    Foreshadowing: Where we are given hints of what is to come.


Explain hamlet s thoughts on page 106

Explain Hamlet’s thoughts on page 106


Chapter 19

Chapter 19

  • What do you know about badgers?

  • What do you think it might symbolise?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • “It lay there waiting in fear for the end. Until then death had meant nothing more than the avoidance of pain; now the creature understood oblivion” (112)

  • What is the significance of this quotation?

  • How does it relate to the ideas of the text?


Character tables

Character Tables

  • Find a significant quotation about Horatio on page 109.

  • Find a significant quotation about Hamlet on page 113.

  • “Horatio…liked everything to have meaning and purpose”

  • “Hamlet could not do it in front of anyone, only on his own”


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • Killed in anger

  • Forced to kill it and didn’t want to, so did a terrible job

  • Also note, Ophelia, “nothing is such pain should live” (113). What does this foreshadow?

  • Additionally, disloyalty from Horatio (better swordsman)


Discussion

Discussion

  • How is anger different to revenge?

  • Why is it significant that Hamlet feels anger when he is killing the badger?

  • How does this foreshadow events?


To understand the term dramatic irony

To understand the term dramatic irony

STARTER:

  • “There was a time when Claudius dreamed of hearing such things, when he had imagined that the flattery of courtiers would be sweet to the ears like roses to the nose” (116)

  • What does this reveal of Claudius?

  • What language technique is highlighted in red?


Add these quotations to your character table

Add these quotations to your character table

  • “Hamlet dominated Elisnore tonight, as so often before, even during times when he hadn’t done much” (116)

  • “Claudius betrayed his wife without a second thought” (117)

  • “My crown, my queen, and the life I coveted” (118)

  • “He was sustained by his sense of righteousness” (123)


Chapter twenty

Chapter Twenty

  • Dramatic irony. Where the audience knows more than the characters do.

    What do we know that none of the other characters know?


Chapter twenty one

Chapter Twenty-One

  • “Relentless, boring in on her, grey eyes arctic”

    Is an example of:

  • Simile

  • Metaphor

  • Personification


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • Goal: to examine the importance of Polonius’ death


Starter reread page 129

Starter: reread page 129

  • How does Hamlet judge Gertrude?

  • What values are expressed here?

  • Do you agree with his judgement? Why/not?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • ‘“You show me such black and cancerous spots within, that my vision fails me”’ (130)

    What are the cancerous spots?


Foreshadowing

Foreshadowing

  • ‘“He may weigh more in death than he did in life”’ (133)

    In what ways will Polonius’ death “weigh more”?


Unpacking polonius death

Unpacking Polonius’ death

  • Describe what happens to Polonius?

  • Does he contribute to his fate?

  • How does Ophelia take the news of her father’s death?


Who wears masks

Who wears masks?

Hamlet

Horatio

Claudius

Gertrude

Ophelia

What is the nature of these masks?


Mask activity

Mask Activity

  • Choose either Hamlet, Ophelia, Gertrude or Claudius and design a mask that illustrates the light and dark aspects of their personality.


Goal to examine the consequences of hamlet s actions

Goal: to examine the consequences of Hamlet’s actions

“Committed to an act that could not be recalled…Hamlet looked ready to precipitate a landslide, without a thought as to who might be buried in its path” (99)

  • Starter: who has been “buried in [the] path” of the “landslide”?


Key quotations

Key Quotations

  • “It was Hamlet, everything was Hamlet, he had turned every life in the castle upside down with his disregard for everyone but himself” (155)

  • “Everyone had problems, that was the way of it, and it was not good to let them weigh you down until they drowned you” (156)

    What do these reveal? (Hamlet and themes)


Summary

Summary

  • Hamlet confronted his mother

  • Mistook Polonius for Claudius and killed him

  • Gertrude and Claudius are worried about the ramifications of Hamlet’s actions

  • Hamlet exiled to England with Guildenstern and Rosencrantz

  • Ophelia has gone mad (death of father, abandoned by Hamlet and according to Marsden, sexual frustration)


Chapter twenty five

Chapter Twenty Five

  • Ensure that you have answered questions 1-7


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • Starter: What is Claudius and Laertes plan?


Revenge

Revenge

Claudius asks Laertes:

‘“…is your desire for revenge so overwhelming that you don’t care who you attack? Will both friend and foe fall to you avenging sword?”’

Laertes responds, ‘“Of course not. His enemies only.”

What do we, as the reader, know that Laertes doesn’t?

What have we learnt about revenge?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • “…I am responsible. I who am irresponsible…I caused the deaths, in the same way that a Danish soldier kills a Norwegian foot-soldier, and at that moment, neither man thinks of the kings who started the war” (196)

  • What does this suggest?


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

218


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

223


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

224


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

226


Revenge1

Revenge

  • What is it?

  • What characters sought revenge? Why?

  • Were they successful? Why/not?

  • What did you learn?


Themes

Themes

  • What do you think the other themes of the play are?


Watch1

Watch

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english_literature/dramahamlet/hamletthemesact.shtml


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Read

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english_literature/dramahamlet/hamlet_themes1.shtml

  • Complete the quiz


Goal to form an interpretation of the text

Goal: to form an interpretation of the text

  • Starter: what were the four themes identified on the BBC website?

  • Revenge

  • Madness

  • Deception

  • Family and sexuality


Watch2

Watch

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english_literature/dramahamlet/hamletthemesact.shtml


How many paragraphs should an essay have what are they

How many paragraphs should an essay have?What are they?

Answers: a minimum of five

Introduction, Body (minimum of three paragraphs) and Conclusion

On a scale of 1-5, how confident do you feel about writing an essay? (5 v. confident)


What is t e e l an acronym for

What is T.E.E.L an acronym for?

  • Topic Sentence

  • Explanation

  • Evidence

  • Linking Sentence

Remember with essay writing, you are to assume that your reader has a thorough understanding of the text. Do not recount plot instead ensure that all of your ideas are analytically focused.


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • Topic Sentence: sums up the main point of the paragraph

  • Explanation: develops the point made in the topic sentence

  • Evidence: use relevant explanation, details and examples to support your topic sentence

  • Link: a sentence that rounds off the paragraph and links back to the topic sentence.


Topic john marsden s hamlet a novel is mainly a story about revenge discuss

Topic: ‘John Marsden’s Hamlet: A Novel is mainly a story about revenge.’ Discuss

  • Step one: what is the topic asking you? Define key terms (mainly, revenge)

  • Step two: where is revenge illustrated in the text?

  • Step three: are other themes examined? What does the majority of the text focus on? Positive. Examine the text for evidence.

  • Step four: form your line of argument/contention.

    Solely about revenge, mainly about revenge but focuses on other themes, revenge is a minor theme


Prepare to explain your position

Prepare to explain your position

  • ‘Hamlet: A Novel is mainly a story of revenge.’

No

Yes


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

Plan

  • Once you have decided your contention, examine the text for evidence and select your three-four arguments (these arguments must be theme based)


Goal to apply my knowledge and understanding of the text in an analytical essay

Goal: to apply my knowledge and understanding of the text in an analytical essay

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english_literature/dramahamlet/hamletplotact.shtml

  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/english_literature/dramahamlet/hamletcharact.shtml


Hamlet s choices cause his own downfall and the downfall of those around him discuss

“Hamlet’s choices cause his own downfall, and the downfall of those around him.” Discuss

  • Step one: what is the topic asking you? Define key terms (choice, cause, downfall, Hamlet’s fate, the fate of others)

  • Step two: what was Hamlet’s choice? How did it affect him? How did it affect others? Was anyone unaffected?

  • Step three: what theme does this focus on? What is Marsden’s overall message?

  • Step four: form your line of argument/contention.

    Hamlet’s quest for revenge caused his downfall, and the downfall of others.

    All characters were ruined, but Hamlet’s actions were dictated to him by his father and the code of conduct of the day.

    It wasn’t Hamlet’s actions, rather all characters are responsible for their own downfall.


To develop my understanding of the way that language has changed through time

  • Possible structure.

    Hamlet’s quest for revenge caused his downfall.

    Deceit and subterfuge assisted in the downfall of…

    Anger and jealousy…

    Control and madness contributed to…


Revenge2

Revenge


Madness

Madness


Deception

Deception


Family and sexuality

Family and Sexuality


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