What are the effects of self assessment preparation in a middle school science classroom
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What are the Effects of Self-Assessment Preparation in a Middle School Science Classroom?. Sara E. Severance Mapleton Expeditionary School of the Arts, Thornton, CO University of Colorado, Boulder, CO Streamline to Mastery Professional Development Program. PER at Colorado. Grad Students:

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What are the effects of self assessment preparation in a middle school science classroom

What are the Effects of Self-Assessment Preparation in a Middle School Science Classroom?

Sara E. Severance

Mapleton Expeditionary School of the Arts, Thornton, CO

University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

Streamline to Mastery Professional Development Program


Per at colorado
PER Middle School Science Classroom?at Colorado

Grad Students:

Stephanie Barr

Kara Gray

Lauren Kost-Smith (PhD May 11)

May Lee

Mike Ross

Ben Spike

  • Ben Van Dusen

  • Bethany Wilcox

    Teachers / Partners / Staff:

  • Shelly Belleau

  • Jackie Elser,

  • Trish Loeblein

  • Susan M. Nicholson-Dykstra

  • Sara Severence

  • Emily Quinty

  • Mindy Gratny, Kate Kidder

  • John Blanco, Sam Reid

  • Chris Malley, Jon Olson

  • Oliver Nix, Nina Zabolotnaya

Faculty:

Melissa Dancy

Michael Dubson

Noah Finkelstein

Valerie Otero

Kathy Perkins

Steven Pollock

Carl Wieman (on leave)

Postdocs/ Scientists:

Charles Baily

Danny Caballero

Stephanie Chasteen

Julia Chamberlain

Kelly Lancaster

Laurel Mayhew

Emily Moore

Ariel Paul

Rachel Pepper

Noah Podolefsky

Benjamin Zwickl


Benefits of self assessment
Benefits Middle School Science Classroom?of Self-Assessment

  • Students become better critical thinkers [1]

  • Students can direct their own learning more effectively [1]

  • Students can monitor their own progress [3]

D. Nunan. The Learner Centered Curriculum, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988

3. M. Harris, “Self-Assessment of Language Learning in Formal Settings,” ELT Journal. 51: (1997)


Previous studies
Previous Studies Middle School Science Classroom?

  • Multiple studies done at the university level showed that students who engaged in self-assessment practices:

    • scored higher on assignments [5]

    • showed higher conceptual gains [6]

    • produced marks that were closer to their professor’s marks over time [7]

5. B. McDonald, “Improving Learning through Meta Assessment,” Active Learning in High Education. 11: 119-129 (2010)

6. E. Etkina, “College Physics Students Epistemological Self-Reflection and its Relationship to Conceptual Learning,” American Journal of Physics. 70: 1249-1259(2002)

7. Y.Chen, “Learning to Self-Assess Oran Performance in English: A Longitudinal Case Study,” Language Teaching Research. 12: 235-262(2008)


Hypotheses
Hypotheses Middle School Science Classroom?

  • Students who can accurately self-assess will score higher on final assessments than students who cannot accurately self-assess.

  • Students who participate in the self-assessment preparationwill score better than students who do not.

  • Students will get better at self-assessing over time.


Research context
Research Context Middle School Science Classroom?

  • Small urban 7th – 12th grade school

  • 8th grade physical science

  • 100 students

  • 37% English-Language Learners

  • 82% Free and Reduced Lunch


Methods
Methods Middle School Science Classroom?

Students in the treatment group used a self-assessment learning target tracker to keep track of their scores and the teacher’s scores for each lesson.

Control Group

explaining physical

I can group elements based on physical and chemical properties.

3

2

properties

Yes

9/2

15

grouping elements

3 - 2 = 1 discrepancy value


Methods1
Methods Middle School Science Classroom?

The treatment was applied to different classes of students throughout the year.


Methods and data collection
Methods and Data Collection Middle School Science Classroom?

  • Average absolute discrepancy scores for each student were compared to final assessment scores

  • Assessment scores for students who engaged in the self-assessment tracking were compared to those who did not.

  • Discrepancy scores were compared over time

  • Qualitative and survey data were also taken


Result 1
Result 1 Middle School Science Classroom?

There was no correlation between students’ ability to self-assess and test scores.

Hypothesis

R2 = 0.0019


Result 2
Result 2 Middle School Science Classroom?

Students who engaged in self-assessment tracking did not score better on final assessments compared to students who did not engage in self-assessment tracking .

= treatment


Results 3
Results 3 Middle School Science Classroom?

Students did not get better at self-assessing over time.

hypothesis


Result 3
Result 3 Middle School Science Classroom?

The type of question may have had more of an effect on students ability to self-assess.


Survey results
Survey Results Middle School Science Classroom?

  • 91% of students felt they were aware of their understanding on a particular concept

  • 61% of students could articulate their understanding using specific science vocabulary.

Student Example:


Conclusions and implications
Conclusions and Implications Middle School Science Classroom?

  • A student’s awareness of their own learning did not lead to increased achievement

  • Students are engaging in formative assessment practices by using the self-assessment trackers, but what do we do with this information?

  • This study implies that structures need to be in place to help students and teachers use formative assessment data to increase student achievement [9]

9. V. Otero and M. Nathan, “Preservice Elementary Teachers’ Views of their Students’ Prior Knowledge in Science,” Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 45: 497-523 (2008)


Future questions
Future Questions Middle School Science Classroom?

  • What is our next step once students and teachers have formative assessment data?

  • Based on formative assessment data, what in-class structures need to be provided for middle school science students to help address their needs?


References
References Middle School Science Classroom?

1. D. Nunan. The Learner Centered Curriculum, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988

2. D. Little, “The Common European Framework and the European Language Portfolio: involving learners and their judgments in the assessment

process,” Language Testing.22: 321-36 (2005)

3. M. Harris, “Self-Assessment of Language Learning in Formal Settings,” ELT Journal. 51: (1997)

4. N. Falchikov and D. Boud, “Student Self-Assessment in Higher Education: A Meta-Analysis,” Review of Educational Research. 59: (1989-01)

5. B. McDonald, “Improving Learning through Meta Assessment,” Active Learning in High Education. 11: 119-129 (2010)

6. E. Etkina, “College Physics Students Epistemological Self-Reflection and its Relationship to Conceptual Learning,” American Journal of Physics. 70: 1249-1259(2002)

7. Y.Chen, “Learning to Self-Assess Oran Performance in English: A Longitudinal Case Study,” Language Teaching Research. 12: 235-262(2008)

8. S. Ross, “Self-assessment in Second Language Testing: a Meta-Analysis and Analysis of Experiential Factors,” Language Testing.15: 1-20 (1998)

9. V. Otero and M. Nathan, “Preservice Elementary Teachers’ Views of their Students’ Prior Knowledge in Science,” Journal of Research in Science Teaching. 45: 497-523 (2008)


Acknowledgements
Acknowledgements Middle School Science Classroom?

  • Special Thanks to Ryan O’Block, Valerie Otero and members of the Streamline to Mastery Professional Development Program.

  • This work was partially funded by NSF Grant DUE 934921


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